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The Haiku Apprentice: Memoirs of Writing Poetry in Japan

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The Haiku Apprentice: Memoirs of Writing Poetry in Japan Cover

ISBN13: 9781933330044
ISBN10: 193333004x
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"The problem came to a head one day as I was driving through Tokyo. While waiting for the light to change, I saw the following public service announcement on the side of a bus: Omoiyari hitonikurumani konomachini (Sympathy / toward people, toward cars / toward this town). Seventeen syllables. Five-seven-five format. It must be a haiku, I thought. But when I reached the office and repeated the announcement to my Japanese coworkers, none of them thought it was a haiku. I knew they were thinking to themselves, What kind of a lunatic is she? One tried to break the news to me gently, It's not a haiku, it's an advertising jingle. Well, I knew it was an advertising jingle, but still, wasn't it an advertising jingle haiku?" — from The Haiku Apprentice

Abigail Friedman was an American diplomat in Tokyo, not a writer. A chance encounter leads her to a haiku group, where she discovers poetry that anyone can enjoy writing. Her teacher and fellow haiku group members instruct her in seasonal flora and fauna, and gradually she learns to describe the world in plain words, becoming one of the millions in Japan who lead a haiku life. This is the author's story of her literary and cultural voyage, and more: it is an invitation to readers to form their own neighborhood haiku groups and, like her, learn to see the world anew.

Review:

"A deft and seamless merging of genres: at once memoir, travel literature, and an unpretentious guide onto the terrain of Japanese poetry. It will appeal not just to poetry lovers, but to all readers who are curious about the world beyond their own borders." Foreword Magazine

Review:

"Friedman is an appealing guide through an alternate Japan where modern people make poems about teacups and temples but also about skyscrapers and kidney surgery." East Bay Express

Review:

"The book is not designed to make the reader a poet, but it does, perhaps, help us to pay more attention to our poetical eye." Biblio Buffet

Review:

"The Haiku Apprentice gives the reader an original, thoughtful and personal glimpse of one expat's productive encounter with Japan." Metropolis

Review:

"Notable for its frankness and enthusiasm....Friedman has made a lively narrative out of the things she learned." The Japan Times

Synopsis:

Discover the beauty of haiku and be inspired to start your own haiku group!

Synopsis:

The problem came to a head one day as I was driving through Tokyo. While waiting for the light to change, I saw the following public service announcement on the side of a bus:Omoiyari hitonikurumani konomachini (Sympathy / toward people, toward cars / toward this town). Seventeen syllables. Five-seven-five format. It must be a haiku, I thought. But when I reached the office and repeated the announcement to my Japanese coworkers, none of them thought it was a haiku. I knew they were thinking to themselves,What kind of a lunatic is she? One tried to break the news to me gently,It's not a haiku, it's an advertising jingle. Well, I knew it was an advertising jingle, but still, wasn't it an advertising jinglehaiku?-From The Haiku Apprentice

Abigail Friedman was an American diplomat in Tokyo, not a writer. A chance encounter leads her to a haiku group, where she discovers poetry that anyone can enjoy writing. Her teacher and fellow haiku group members instruct her in seasonal flora and fauna, and gradually she learns to describe the world in plain words, becoming one of the millions in Japan who lead a haiku life. This is the author's story of her literary and cultural voyage, and more: it is an invitation to readers to form their own neighborhood haiku groups and, like her, learn to see the world anew.

"...A deft and seamless merging of genres: at once memoir, travel literature, and an unpretentious guide onto the terrain of Japanese poetry. It will appeal not just to poetry lovers, but to all readers who are curious about the world beyond their own borders." — Foreword Magazine

"Friedman is an appealing guide through an alternate Japan where modern people make poems about teacups and temples but also about skyscrapers and kidney surgery." — East Bay Express

"The book is not designed to make the reader a poet, but it does, perhaps, help us to pay more attention to our poetical eye." — BiblioBuffet

"The Haiku Apprenticegives the reader an original, thoughtful and personal glimpse of one expat's productive encounter with Japan." — Metropolis

"...Notable for its frankness and enthusiasm...Friedman has made a lively narrative out of the things she learned..."-- The Japan Times

About the Author

Abigail Friedman joined the Foreign Service in 1988 and served her country in Washington, Paris, Tokyo, the Azores and most recently as Consul General in Quebec City. She is a member of the Haiku Society of America and Haiku Canada. She is a founding member of the bilingual (French/English) Quebec Haiku Group in Quebec City.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Luigi, January 30, 2008 (view all comments by Luigi)
What a great way to learn about Japanese haiku poetry! Most books explain haiku in an analytical fashion that explains what haiku is and what the traditional rules are for writing it. This book takes a more inviting route by telling us the story of an American working in Japan who meets haiku poets and learns from them. This approach gives the reader a much better understanding of what haiku and Japanese culture are about.
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(3 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9781933330044
Author:
Friedman, Abigail
Publisher:
Stone Bridge Press
Foreword by:
Welch, Michael Dylan
Foreword:
Welch, Michael Dylan
Author:
Welch, Michael Dylan
Subject:
General
Subject:
Writing Skills
Subject:
Authorship
Subject:
Poets, American
Subject:
Poets, American -- 20th century.
Subject:
Haiku -- Authorship.
Subject:
Reference/Writing
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20060531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
4 BandW photographs and illustrations
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8 x 5.5 x 0.6 in 10.5 oz

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » Haiku and Tanka
Reference » Writing » General
Travel » General

The Haiku Apprentice: Memoirs of Writing Poetry in Japan New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$14.95 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Stone Bridge Press - English 9781933330044 Reviews:
"Review" by , "A deft and seamless merging of genres: at once memoir, travel literature, and an unpretentious guide onto the terrain of Japanese poetry. It will appeal not just to poetry lovers, but to all readers who are curious about the world beyond their own borders."
"Review" by , "Friedman is an appealing guide through an alternate Japan where modern people make poems about teacups and temples but also about skyscrapers and kidney surgery."
"Review" by , "The book is not designed to make the reader a poet, but it does, perhaps, help us to pay more attention to our poetical eye."
"Review" by , "The Haiku Apprentice gives the reader an original, thoughtful and personal glimpse of one expat's productive encounter with Japan."
"Review" by , "Notable for its frankness and enthusiasm....Friedman has made a lively narrative out of the things she learned."
"Synopsis" by ,
Discover the beauty of haiku and be inspired to start your own haiku group!
"Synopsis" by , The problem came to a head one day as I was driving through Tokyo. While waiting for the light to change, I saw the following public service announcement on the side of a bus:Omoiyari hitonikurumani konomachini (Sympathy / toward people, toward cars / toward this town). Seventeen syllables. Five-seven-five format. It must be a haiku, I thought. But when I reached the office and repeated the announcement to my Japanese coworkers, none of them thought it was a haiku. I knew they were thinking to themselves,What kind of a lunatic is she? One tried to break the news to me gently,It's not a haiku, it's an advertising jingle. Well, I knew it was an advertising jingle, but still, wasn't it an advertising jinglehaiku?-From The Haiku Apprentice

Abigail Friedman was an American diplomat in Tokyo, not a writer. A chance encounter leads her to a haiku group, where she discovers poetry that anyone can enjoy writing. Her teacher and fellow haiku group members instruct her in seasonal flora and fauna, and gradually she learns to describe the world in plain words, becoming one of the millions in Japan who lead a haiku life. This is the author's story of her literary and cultural voyage, and more: it is an invitation to readers to form their own neighborhood haiku groups and, like her, learn to see the world anew.

"...A deft and seamless merging of genres: at once memoir, travel literature, and an unpretentious guide onto the terrain of Japanese poetry. It will appeal not just to poetry lovers, but to all readers who are curious about the world beyond their own borders." — Foreword Magazine

"Friedman is an appealing guide through an alternate Japan where modern people make poems about teacups and temples but also about skyscrapers and kidney surgery." — East Bay Express

"The book is not designed to make the reader a poet, but it does, perhaps, help us to pay more attention to our poetical eye." — BiblioBuffet

"The Haiku Apprenticegives the reader an original, thoughtful and personal glimpse of one expat's productive encounter with Japan." — Metropolis

"...Notable for its frankness and enthusiasm...Friedman has made a lively narrative out of the things she learned..."-- The Japan Times

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