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Original Essays | September 17, 2014

Merritt Tierce: IMG Has My Husband Read It?



My first novel, Love Me Back, was published on September 16. Writing the book took seven years, and along the way three chapters were published in... Continue »
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    Love Me Back

    Merritt Tierce 9780385538077

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You Can't Go Home Again (Perennial Classics)

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You Can't Go Home Again (Perennial Classics) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

George Webber has written a successful novel about his family and hometown. When he returns to that town he is shaken by the force of the outrage and hatred that greets him. Family and friends feel naked and exposed by the truths they have seen in his book, and their fury drives him from his home. He begins a search for his own identity that takes him to New York and a hectic social whirl; to Paris with an uninhibited group of expatriates; to Berlin, lying cold and sinister under Hitler's shadow. At last Webber returns to America and rediscovers it with love, sorrow, and hope.

Review:

"Wolfe wrote as one inspired. No one of his generations has his command of lanuage, his passion, his energy." The New Yorker

Review:

"If there still lingers any doubt as to Wolfe's right to a place among the immortals of American letters, this work should dispel it." Cleveland News

Review:

"[T]he long, crowded pages of imagined and lived scenes are as brilliant as any to be found in Wolfe's writings." Elizabeth Hardwick, New York Review of Books

Synopsis:

When a successful novelist is ostracized by the family and friends of his hometown, he embarks on a worldwide search for his own identity and personal renewal.

Synopsis:

Story of an artist who flees scandal and despair as he journeys from his family home in a small Southern town to the capitals of prewar Europe.

About the Author

Thomas Wolfe was born on October 3, 1900, among the Blue Ridge Mountains in Asheville, North Carolina, a childhood which he immortalized through the creation of Eugene Gant, the hero of Look Homeward, Angel (1929). Wolfe enrolled at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill at the age of fifteen, determined to become a playwright, but despite the success of his college productions, and later, the plays he wrote during his studies at Harvard University's renowned 47 Workshop, he was unable to interest professional New York producers in his work.

Fearing penury and professional failure, Wolfe was encouraged to turn to the writing of fiction full-time by Aline Bernstein, a set designer for the New York Theatre Guild, with whom Wolfe carried on a five-year affair (and who appears in Wolfe's fiction as the Esther Jack character in The Web and the Rock (1939) and Of Time and the River .) Scribner's legendary Maxwell Perkins was the only editor to appreciate Wolfe's freshman effort, Look Homeward, Angel, and after extensive revisions and collaborative editing sessions, the novel was published in 1929. The largely autobiographical book was received with unequivocal enthusiasm. The residents of Asheville, however, the real-life denizens of this "drab circumstance," rebelled against Wolfe's often scathing portrayal of his hometown. The public outcry was so great that Wolfe did not return to his hometown for seven years.

Rewarded with commercial success and a Guggenheim Fellowship, Wolfe wrote a second autobiographical saga about the life of Eugene Gant, Of Time and the River , in which Eugene, an aspiring novelist, details his travels to Europe. This time, the critics were torn. Wolfe's apparent formlessness was both a constant source of delight and frustration to critics, many of whom felt that Wolfe was pioneering new literary ground, while others insisted that the overweening passion inherent in Wolfe's rambling narratives betrayed the author's immaturity and solipsism.

Furthermore, Wolfe's intimate collaboration with his editor, Perkins, were often derided by contemporaries, who insisted that Wolfe's inability to master novelistic form without significant editorial assistance rendered him artistically deficient. The rancorous extent of the criticism led to Wolfe's eventual break with Perkins, and in 1927, Wolfe signed with Edward C. Aswell at Harper. Yet Aswell had no less significant a role in reshaping and trimming Wolfe's future works than Perkins did previously.

The early part of 1938 found Wolfe in Brooklyn, this time writing with a new social agenda. Agreeing with some of his critics that his earlier work was indeed too egocentric, Wolfe rechristened Eugene Gant as George "Monk" Webber, and embarked on writing a new novel dedicated to exploring worldwide social and political ills. This mammoth undertaking, after gargantuan editorial efforts on the part of Aswell, would be published posthumously, and as two novels, The Web and the Rock (1939) and You Can't Go Home Again (1940), as well as The Hills Beyond (1941), a collection which contained short fiction, a play, and a novella. Wolfe's development as a novelist was truncated by his sudden death at the age of thirty-eight, yet the progression of his novels showcases Wolfe's ever-evolving capacities as a writer. Navigating his way from self-obsessed chronicler of his own adolescence to sophisticated assessor of the adolescence of America itself, Wolfe was a writer who grew up in step with the country that both made him and maddened him. He died in 1938..

Product Details

ISBN:
9780060930059
Author:
Wolfe, Thomas
Publisher:
HarpPerenM
Author:
Wolfe, Thomas
Author:
by Thomas Wolfe
Location:
New York :
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Classics
Subject:
American fiction (fictional works by one author)
Subject:
20th century
Subject:
North carolina
Subject:
Love stories
Subject:
Novelists, American
Subject:
Autobiographical fiction
Subject:
Novelists, American -- 20th century -- Fiction.
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Number:
Reprint ed.
Edition Description:
Trade PB
Series:
Perennial Classics
Publication Date:
September 1998
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
720
Dimensions:
8.00x5.31x1.70 in. 1.18 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

You Can't Go Home Again (Perennial Classics) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 720 pages Perennial - English 9780060930059 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Wolfe wrote as one inspired. No one of his generations has his command of lanuage, his passion, his energy."
"Review" by , "If there still lingers any doubt as to Wolfe's right to a place among the immortals of American letters, this work should dispel it."
"Review" by , "[T]he long, crowded pages of imagined and lived scenes are as brilliant as any to be found in Wolfe's writings."
"Synopsis" by , When a successful novelist is ostracized by the family and friends of his hometown, he embarks on a worldwide search for his own identity and personal renewal.
"Synopsis" by , Story of an artist who flees scandal and despair as he journeys from his family home in a small Southern town to the capitals of prewar Europe.

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