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1 Beaverton Religion Eastern- Zen Buddhism
1 Hawthorne Religion Eastern- Zen Buddhism

This title in other editions

Not Always So: Practicing the True Spirit of Zen

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Not Always So: Practicing the True Spirit of Zen Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Chapter OneCalmness of Mind""Calmness of mind is beyond the end of your exhalation, so if you exhale smoothly, without trying to exhale, you are entering into the complete perfect calmness of your mind."Shikantaza, our zazen, is just to be ourselves. When we do not expect anything we can be ourselves. That is our way, to live fully in each moment of time. This practice continues forever.We say, "each moment," but in your actual practice a "moment" is too long because in that "moment" your mind is already involved in following the breath. So we say, "Even in a snap of your fingers there are millions of instants of time." This way we can emphasize the feeling of existing in each instant of time. Then your mind is very quiet.So for a period of time each day, try to sit in shikantaza, without moving, without expecting anything, as if you were in your last moment. Moment after moment you feel your last instant. In each inhalation and each exhalation there are countless instants of time. Your intention is to live in each instant.First practice smoothly exhaling, then inhaling. Calmness of mind is beyond the end of your exhalation. If you exhale smoothly, without even trying to exhale, you are entering into the complete perfect calmness of your mind. You do not exist anymore. When you exhale this way, then naturally your inhalation will start from there. All that fresh blood bringing everything from outside will pervade your body. You are completely refreshed. Then you start to exhale, to extend that fresh feeling into emptiness. So, moment after moment, without trying to do anything, you continue shikantaza.Complete shikantaza may be difficult because of the pain in your legs when you aresitting cross-legged. But even though you have pain in your legs, you can do it. Even though your practice is not good enough, you can do it. Your breathing will gradually vanish. You will gradually vanish, fading into emptiness. Inhaling without effort you naturally come back to yourself with some color or form. Exhaling, you gradually fade into emptiness — empty, white paper. That is shikantaza. The important point is your exhalation. Instead of trying to feel yourself as you inhale, fade into emptiness as you exhale.When you practice this in your last moment, you will have nothing to be afraid of. You are actually aiming at emptiness. You become one with everything after you completely exhale with this feeling. If you are still alive, naturally you will inhale again. "Oh, I'm still alive! Fortunately or unfortunately!" Then you start to exhale and fade into emptiness. Maybe you don't know what kind of feeling it is. But some of you know it. By some chance you must have felt this kind of feeling.When you do this practice, you cannot easily become angry. When you are more interested in inhaling than in exhaling, you easily become quite angry. You are always trying to be alive. The other day my friend had a heart attack, and all he could do was exhale. He couldn't inhale. That was a terrible feeling, he said. At that moment if he could have practiced exhaling as we do, aiming for emptiness, then I think he would not have felt so bad. The great joy for us is exhaling rather than inhaling. When my friend kept trying to inhale, he thought he couldn't inhale anymore. If he could have exhaled smoothly and completely, then I think another inhalation would have come more easily.To take careof the exhalation is very important. To die is more important than trying to be alive. When we always try to be alive, we have trouble. Rather than trying to be alive or active, if we can be calm and die or fade away into emptiness, then naturally we will be all right. Buddha will take care of us. Because we have lost our mother's bosom, we do not feel like her child anymore. Yet fading away into emptiness can feel like being at our mother's bosom, and we will feel as though she will take care of us. Moment after moment, do not lose this practice of shikantaza.Various kinds of religious practice are included in this point. When people say "Namu Amida Butsu, Namu Amida Butsu," they want to be Amida Buddha's children. That is why they practice repeating Amida Buddha's name. The same is true with our zazen practice. If we know how to practice shikantaza, and if they know how to repeat Amida Buddha's name, it cannot be different.So we have enjoyment, we are free. We feel free to express ourselves because we are ready to fade into emptiness. When we are trying to be active and special and to accomplish something, we cannot express ourselves. Small self will be expressed, but big self will not appear from the emptiness. From the emptiness only great self appears. That is shikantaza, okay? It is not so difficult if you really try.Thank you very much.

Synopsis:

Thirty years after his death, Suzuki's first book, Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind continues to be one of the world's best-selling books on Buddhism. This second volume contains his final lectures, given when he knew he was dying. Rich with Suzuki's simple, powerful words, the topics include living in each moment, expressing yourself fully, and "wherever you are, enlightenment is there."

Whether speaking on changing karma or walking like an elephant ("Slowly without idea of hasty gain"), Suzuki Roshi's guidance empowers freedom rather than prescribing thought. This extraordinary collection allows Suzuki Roshi's presence to enter your life in the form of a wise, warm-hearted friend. Entirely in Suzuki's own words, Not Always So is a special gift for anyone seeking spiritual growth and inner peace.

Synopsis:

Practising the true spirit of Zen.

Not Always So is based on Shunryu Suzuki's lectures and is framed in his own inimitable, allusive, paradoxical style, rich with unexpected and off–centre insights. Suzuki knew he was dying at the time of the lectures, which gives his thoughts an urgency and focus even sharper than in the earlier book.

In Not Always So Suzuki once again voices Zen in everyday language with the vigour, sensitivity, and buoyancy of a true friend. Here is support and nourishment. Here is a mother and father lending a hand, but letting you find your own way. Here is guidance which empowers your freedom (or way–seeking mind), rather than pinning you down to directions and techniques. Here is teaching which encourages you to touch and know your true heart and to express yourself fully, teaching which is not teaching from outside, but a voice arising in your own being.

Synopsis:

Our tendency is to be interested in something that is growing in the garden, not in the bare soil itself. But if you want to have a good harvest, the most important thing is to make the soil rich and cultivate it well.

In a beautiful companion volume to Shunryu Suzuki's first book, Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind, this is a collection of thirty-five lectures taken from the last three years of Suzuki's life that has been masterfully edited by Edward Espe Brown, bestselling author and one of Suzuki's students.

In Not Always So Shunryu Suzuki voices Zen in everyday language, with humor and good-heartedness. While offering sustenance — much like a mother or father lending a hand — Suzuki encourages you to find your own way. Rather than emphasizing specific directions and techniques, his teaching encourages you to touch and know your true heart and to express yourself fully.

Wise and inspirational, Not Always So is a wonderful gift for anyone seeking spiritual fulfillment and inner peace.

About the Author

The Zen master Shunryu Suzuki was an unassuming, much-beloved spiritual teacher. Born the son of a Zen master in 1904, Suzuki began Zen training as a youngster and matured over many years of practice in Japan. After continuing to devote himself to his priestly life throughout the Second World War (when priests often turned to other occupations), Suzuki came to San Francisco in 1959. While some priests had come to the West with "new suits and shiny shoes," Suzuki decided to come "in an old robe with a shiny [shaved] head." Attracting students over several years, Suzuki established the Zen Center in San Francisco, with a training temple at Tassajara-the first in the West. After a lengthy illness, he died of cancer in December 1971.

Edward Espe Brown was ordained as a Zen priest in 1971 by Shunryu Suzuki, who gave him the name Jusan Kainei, "Longevity Mountain, Peaceful Sea." While a student at the Tassajara Zen Mountain Center, he wrote two bestselling books, The Tassajara Bread Book and Tassajara Cooking. His most recent book is Tomato Blessings and Radish Teachings.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780060957544
Subtitle:
Practicing the True Spirit of Zen
Author:
Suzuki, Shunryu
Author:
Brown, Edward Espe
Author:
San Francisco, Zen Center
Author:
by Shunryu Suzuki and Edward Espe Brown
Publisher:
HarperOne
Location:
(New York)
Subject:
Spiritual life
Subject:
Zen
Subject:
Buddhism - Zen
Subject:
Eastern - General
Subject:
Eastern - Zen
Subject:
Zen buddhism
Subject:
Religion Eastern-Zen Buddhism
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st Quill ed.
Edition Description:
Trade PB
Publication Date:
20090602
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
176
Dimensions:
7.93x5.41x.42 in. .29 lbs.

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Related Subjects


Humanities » Philosophy » General
Religion » Eastern Religions » Buddhism » Zen Buddhism
Religion » Eastern Religions » Japanese Philosophy
Religion » Eastern Religions » Philosophy General

Not Always So: Practicing the True Spirit of Zen Used Trade Paper
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Product details 176 pages Perennial - English 9780060957544 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Thirty years after his death, Suzuki's first book, Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind continues to be one of the world's best-selling books on Buddhism. This second volume contains his final lectures, given when he knew he was dying. Rich with Suzuki's simple, powerful words, the topics include living in each moment, expressing yourself fully, and "wherever you are, enlightenment is there."

Whether speaking on changing karma or walking like an elephant ("Slowly without idea of hasty gain"), Suzuki Roshi's guidance empowers freedom rather than prescribing thought. This extraordinary collection allows Suzuki Roshi's presence to enter your life in the form of a wise, warm-hearted friend. Entirely in Suzuki's own words, Not Always So is a special gift for anyone seeking spiritual growth and inner peace.

"Synopsis" by , Practising the true spirit of Zen.

Not Always So is based on Shunryu Suzuki's lectures and is framed in his own inimitable, allusive, paradoxical style, rich with unexpected and off–centre insights. Suzuki knew he was dying at the time of the lectures, which gives his thoughts an urgency and focus even sharper than in the earlier book.

In Not Always So Suzuki once again voices Zen in everyday language with the vigour, sensitivity, and buoyancy of a true friend. Here is support and nourishment. Here is a mother and father lending a hand, but letting you find your own way. Here is guidance which empowers your freedom (or way–seeking mind), rather than pinning you down to directions and techniques. Here is teaching which encourages you to touch and know your true heart and to express yourself fully, teaching which is not teaching from outside, but a voice arising in your own being.

"Synopsis" by ,

Our tendency is to be interested in something that is growing in the garden, not in the bare soil itself. But if you want to have a good harvest, the most important thing is to make the soil rich and cultivate it well.

In a beautiful companion volume to Shunryu Suzuki's first book, Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind, this is a collection of thirty-five lectures taken from the last three years of Suzuki's life that has been masterfully edited by Edward Espe Brown, bestselling author and one of Suzuki's students.

In Not Always So Shunryu Suzuki voices Zen in everyday language, with humor and good-heartedness. While offering sustenance — much like a mother or father lending a hand — Suzuki encourages you to find your own way. Rather than emphasizing specific directions and techniques, his teaching encourages you to touch and know your true heart and to express yourself fully.

Wise and inspirational, Not Always So is a wonderful gift for anyone seeking spiritual fulfillment and inner peace.

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