Poetry Madness
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Interviews | March 17, 2014

Shawn Donley: IMG Peter Stark: The Powells.com Interview



Peter StarkIt's hard to believe that 200 years ago, the Pacific Northwest was one of the most remote and isolated regions in the world. In 1810, four years... Continue »
  1. $19.59 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$5.95
List price: $7.99
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Children's Young Adult- Anthologies

More copies of this ISBN

Am I Blue?: Coming Out from the Silence

by

Am I Blue?: Coming Out from the Silence Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Original stories by C. S. Adler, Marion Dane Bauer, Francesca Lia Block, Bruce Coville, Nancy Garden, James Cross Giblin, Ellen Howard, M. E. Kerr, Jonathan London, Lois Lowry, Gregory Maguire, Lesléa Newman, Cristina Salat, William Sleator, Jacqueline Woodson, and Jane Yolen

Each of these stories is original, each is by a noted author for young adults, and each honestly portrays its subject and theme — growing up gay or lesbian, or with gay or lesbian parents or friends.

Review:

"When a book that sets out to do good turns out to be as good as this one, we are all winners." Katherine Paterson in The Washington Post)

Synopsis:

A heartfelt memoir by the father of a gay teen, and an eye-opening guide for families who hope to bring up well-adjusted gay adults.

Three years ago, John Schwartz, a national correspondent at The New York Times, got the call that every parent hopes never to receive: his thirteen-year-old son, Joe, was in the hospital following a failed suicide attempt. After finally mustering the courage to come out to his classmates, Joeandrsquo;s disclosure andmdash; delivered in a tirade about homophobic attitudesandmdash;was greeted with dismay and confusion by his fellow students. Hours later, he took an overdose of pills.

In the aftermath, John and his wife, Jeanne, found that their sonandrsquo;s school was unable to address Joeandrsquo;s special needs. Angry and frustrated, they initiated their own search for services and groups that could help Joe understand that he wasnandrsquo;t alone. Oddly Normal is Schwartzandrsquo;s very personal attempt to address his familyandrsquo;s own struggles within a culture that is changing fast, but not fast enough to help gay kids like Joe.

Schwartz follows Joseph through childhood to the present day, interweaving his narrative with common questions, including: Are effeminate boys and tomboy girls necessarily gay? Is there a relationship between being gay and suicide or mental illness? Should a child be pushed into coming out? Parents, teachers, and counselors alike will welcome Oddly Normal and its crucial lessons about helping gay kids andndash;and any kid who is different — learn how to cope in a potentially hostile world.

and#160;

Synopsis:

A heartfelt memoir by the father of a gay teen, and an eye-opening story for families who hope to bring up well-adjusted gay adults.

Three years ago, John Schwartz, a national correspondent at The New York Times, got the call that every parent hopes never to receive: his thirteen-year-old son, Joe, was in the hospital following a failed suicide attempt. After mustering the courage to come out to his classmates, Joeandrsquo;s disclosure andmdash; delivered in a tirade about homophobic attitudesandmdash;was greeted with dismay and confusion by his fellow students. Hours later, he took an overdose of pills.

and#160;

Additionally, John and his wife, Jeanne, found that their sonandrsquo;s school was unable to address Joeandrsquo;s special needs. Angry and frustrated, they initiated their own search for services and groups that could help Joe understand that he wasnandrsquo;t alone. Oddly Normal is Schwartzandrsquo;s very personal attempt to address his familyandrsquo;s own struggles within a culture that is changing fast, but not fast enough to help gay kids like Joe.

Schwartz follows Joseph through childhood to the present day, interweaving his narrative with common questions, including: Are effeminate boys and tomboy girls necessarily gay? Is there a relationship between being gay and suicide or mental illness? Should a child be pushed into coming out? Parents, teachers, and counselors alike will welcome Oddly Normal and its crucial lessons about helping gay kids andndash;and any kid who is different — learn how to cope in a potentially hostile world.

and#160;

About the Author

Marion Dane Bauer was awarded a Newbery Honor in 1987 for her book On My Honor. She has been publishing award-winning books since 1976, including Rain of Fire, which received the 1984 Jane Addams Children's Book Award, and the 1993 ALA Notable Children's Book What's Your Story? A Young Person's Guide to Writing Fiction.

She conceived of the idea and gathered the authors for this collection out of a conviction that those who write for young people have a responsibility, whenever possible, to speak out on subjects such as homosexuality that society attempts to shroud in silence.

Ms. Bauer lives in Minneapolis with her partner, Ann Goddard.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780064405874
Editor:
Bauer, Marion Dane
Author:
Underwood, Beck
Editor:
Bauer, Marion Dane
Author:
erwood, Beck
Author:
by Marion Dane Bauer and Beck Underwood
Author:
Und
Author:
Alexander, Victoria
Author:
Bauer, Marion Dane
Author:
Schwartz, John
Publisher:
Harper Teen
Location:
New York :
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Children's 12-Up - Fiction - General
Subject:
Short stories
Subject:
Social Situations - Dating & Sex
Subject:
Juveniles
Subject:
Social Situations - Homosexuality
Subject:
Homosexuality
Subject:
Short stories, American
Subject:
Social Issues - Homosexuality
Subject:
Social Issues - Dating & Sex
Subject:
Situations / Dating & Sex
Subject:
Romance - Historical
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction-Homosexuality
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1
Edition Description:
Paperback
Series Volume:
87-3
Publication Date:
19950431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 7
Language:
English
Illustrations:
One 8-pg bandw photo insert
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.23x5.46x.82 in. .73 lbs.
Age Level:
from 13

Other books you might like

  1. Keeping You a Secret
    Used Trade Paper $3.95
  2. Annie on My Mind
    Used Mass Market $3.50
  3. Deliver Us from Evie Used Mass Market $0.95
  4. Rainbow Boys
    Used Trade Paper $4.95
  5. Monster
    Used Book Club Hardcover $3.95
  6. Speak
    Used Book Club Paperback $3.50

Related Subjects


Young Adult » Fiction » Anthologies
Young Adult » Fiction » Short Stories
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Dating and Sex
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Homosexuality
Young Adult » General

Am I Blue?: Coming Out from the Silence Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.95 In Stock
Product details 288 pages HarperTrophy - English 9780064405874 Reviews:
"Review" by , "When a book that sets out to do good turns out to be as good as this one, we are all winners." Katherine Paterson in The Washington Post)
"Synopsis" by ,

A heartfelt memoir by the father of a gay teen, and an eye-opening guide for families who hope to bring up well-adjusted gay adults.

Three years ago, John Schwartz, a national correspondent at The New York Times, got the call that every parent hopes never to receive: his thirteen-year-old son, Joe, was in the hospital following a failed suicide attempt. After finally mustering the courage to come out to his classmates, Joeandrsquo;s disclosure andmdash; delivered in a tirade about homophobic attitudesandmdash;was greeted with dismay and confusion by his fellow students. Hours later, he took an overdose of pills.

In the aftermath, John and his wife, Jeanne, found that their sonandrsquo;s school was unable to address Joeandrsquo;s special needs. Angry and frustrated, they initiated their own search for services and groups that could help Joe understand that he wasnandrsquo;t alone. Oddly Normal is Schwartzandrsquo;s very personal attempt to address his familyandrsquo;s own struggles within a culture that is changing fast, but not fast enough to help gay kids like Joe.

Schwartz follows Joseph through childhood to the present day, interweaving his narrative with common questions, including: Are effeminate boys and tomboy girls necessarily gay? Is there a relationship between being gay and suicide or mental illness? Should a child be pushed into coming out? Parents, teachers, and counselors alike will welcome Oddly Normal and its crucial lessons about helping gay kids andndash;and any kid who is different — learn how to cope in a potentially hostile world.

and#160;

"Synopsis" by ,

A heartfelt memoir by the father of a gay teen, and an eye-opening story for families who hope to bring up well-adjusted gay adults.

Three years ago, John Schwartz, a national correspondent at The New York Times, got the call that every parent hopes never to receive: his thirteen-year-old son, Joe, was in the hospital following a failed suicide attempt. After mustering the courage to come out to his classmates, Joeandrsquo;s disclosure andmdash; delivered in a tirade about homophobic attitudesandmdash;was greeted with dismay and confusion by his fellow students. Hours later, he took an overdose of pills.

and#160;

Additionally, John and his wife, Jeanne, found that their sonandrsquo;s school was unable to address Joeandrsquo;s special needs. Angry and frustrated, they initiated their own search for services and groups that could help Joe understand that he wasnandrsquo;t alone. Oddly Normal is Schwartzandrsquo;s very personal attempt to address his familyandrsquo;s own struggles within a culture that is changing fast, but not fast enough to help gay kids like Joe.

Schwartz follows Joseph through childhood to the present day, interweaving his narrative with common questions, including: Are effeminate boys and tomboy girls necessarily gay? Is there a relationship between being gay and suicide or mental illness? Should a child be pushed into coming out? Parents, teachers, and counselors alike will welcome Oddly Normal and its crucial lessons about helping gay kids andndash;and any kid who is different — learn how to cope in a potentially hostile world.

and#160;

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.