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We

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We Cover

ISBN13: 9780140185850
ISBN10: 0140185852
Condition: Underlined
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A superb new translation of the classic dystopian novel Set in the twenty-sixth century AD, Zamyatin's masterpiece describes life under the regimented totalitarian society of OneState, ruled over by the all-powerful 'Benefactor'. Recognized as the inspiration for George Orwell's 1984, We is the archetype of the modern dystopia, or anti-Utopia: a great prose poem detailing the fate that might befall us all if we surrender our individual selves to some collective dream of technology and fail in the vigilance that is the price of freedom. Clarence Brown's brilliant translation is based on the corrected text of the novel, first published in Russia in 1988 after more than sixty years' suppression.

Synopsis:

In a glass-enclosed city of absolute straight lines, nameless numbers, survivors of a devastating war, live out lives devoid of passion and creativity. Until D-503, a mathematician who dreams in numbers, makes a discovery: he has an individual soul. Reputedly the inspiration for Orwell's 1984.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [xxxi]-xxxii).

About the Author

Yevgeny Ivanovich Zamyatin (1884-1937) was a naval architect by profession and a writer by nature. His favorite idea was the absolute freedom of the human personality to create, to imagine, to love, to make mistakes, and to change the world. This made him a highly inconvenient citizen of two despotisms, the tsarist and the Communist, both of which exiled him, the first for a year, the latter forever. He wrote short stories, plays, and essays, but his masterpiece is We, written in 1920-21 and soon thereafter translated into most of the languages of the world. It first appeared in Russia only in 1988. It is the archetype of the modern dystopia, or anti-utopia; a great prose poem on the fate that might befall all of us if we surrender our individual selves to some collective dream of technology and fail in the vigilance that is the price of freedom. George Orwell, the author of 1984, acknowledged his debt to Zamyatin. The other great English dystopia of our time, Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, was evidently written out of the same impulse, though without direct knowledge of Zamyatin’s We.

Clarence Brown is the author of several works on the Russian poet Osip Mandelstam. He is editor of The Portable Twentieth-Century Russian Reader, which contains his translation of Zamyatin’s short story “The Cave,” and of Yury Olesha’s novel Enpy.

Clarence Brown is the author of several works on the Russian poet Osip Mandelstam. He is editor of The Portable Twentieth-Century Russian Reader, which contains his translation of Zamyatin’s short story “The Cave,” and of Yury Olesha’s novel Enpy.

Table of Contents

Introduction: Zamyatin and the Rooster

Notes to Introduction

Suggestions for Further Reading

WE Record 1

Announcement

The Wisest of Lines

An Epic Poem

Record 2

Ballet

Harmony Squared

X

Record 3

Jacket

Wall

The Table

Record 4

Savage with Barometer

Epilepsy

If

Record 5

Square

Rulers of the World

Pleasant and Useful Function

Record 6

Accident

Damned "Clear"

24 Hours

Record 7

An Eyelash

Taylor

Henbane and Lily of the Valley

Record 8

The Irrational Root

R-13

Triangle

Record 9

Liturgy

Iambs and Trochees

Cast-Iron Hand

Record 10

Letter

Membrane

Hairy Me

Record 11

No, I Can't...

Skip the Contents

Record 12

Limitation of Infinity

Angel

Reflections on Poetry

Record 13

Fog

Familiar "You"

An Absolutely Inane Occurrence

Record 14

"Mine"

Forbidden

Cold Floor

Record 15

Bell

Mirror-like Sea

My Fate to Burn Forever

Record 16

Yellow

Two-Dimensional Shadow

Incurable Soul

Record 17

Through Glass

I Died

Hallways

Record 18

Logical Labyrinth

Wounds and Plaster

Never Again

Record 19

Third-Order Infinitesimal

A Sullen Glare

Over the Parapet

Record 20

Discharge

Idea Material

Zero Cliff

Record 21

An Author's Duty

Swollen Ice

The Most Difficult Love

Record 22

Frozen Waves

Everything Tends to Perfection

I Am a Microbe

Record 23

Flowers

Dissolution of a Crystal

If Only

Record 24

Limit of Function

Easter

Cross It All Out

Record 25

Descent from Heaven

History's Greatest Catastrophe

End of the Known

Record 26

The World Exists

A Rash

41 Centigrade

Record 27

No Contents - Can't

Record 28

Both Women

Entropy and Energy

Opaque Part of the Body

Record 29

Threads on the Face

Shoots

Unnatural Compression

Record 30

The Final Number

Galileo's Mistake

Wouldn't It Be Better?

Record 31

The Great Operation

I Have Forgiven Everything

A Train Wreck

Record 32

I Do Not Believe

Tractors

The Human Chip

Record 33

(No Time for Contents, Last Note)

Record 34

Those on Leave

A Sunny Night

Radio-Valkyrie

Record 35

In a Hoop

Carrot

Murder

Record 36

Blank Pages

The Christian God

About My Mother

Record 37

Infusorian

Doomsday

Her Room

Record 38

(I Don't Know What Goes Here, Maybe Just: A Cigarette Butt)

Record 39

The End

Record 40

Facts

The Bell

I Am Certain

Translator's Notes

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

emmejo, June 7, 2013 (view all comments by emmejo)
I do think this is a book that you have to read slowly, which is what I did, since there is so much info and it is often communicated in a disjointed way by our unreliable narrator. I could see where some people would get frustrated with it.

I found the almost ironic contrast between the setting, a high-tech far future, and the main character's conflict, whether or not to cheat on his wife-equivalent, intriguing. Often we expect some sort of epic heroism from sci-fi, especially dystopias, so having a MC who is not a man of action, but a bystander, unaware of the societal chaos he is fueling, makes for an unusual viewpoint.

I also loved the author's descriptions of characters and use of contrasts between them. O is a soft, friendly, familiar and natural women, while I is predatory, but dangerous and compelling and seductive because of her strangeness. R is outgoing, as much of a risk-taker as is allowed in this society, while D is extremely reserved in his expressions until being caught up in I's wake.

I thought the author did a good job showing D's mental state through his writing, which starts out as formulaic and precise, moves towards what we might term a "normal" style, and then goes farther, into a knotted mass of ideas and feelings which he has no experience trying to trap on paper, and finally the result of OneState's decision becomes clear in the remote brevity of his final entry.
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Mateo, February 16, 2010 (view all comments by Mateo)
An incredibly influential book...and an obvious precursor to Orwell's 1984. The excellent mix of well-written prose, suspense, and unpredictability make for an masterful story which will stay with long after your have finished the novel.

It's strange, I really enjoyed this book (almost as much as I did Orwell's 1984), but if I had read this book before 1984...then I think I would have liked it even more (and 1984 less).

A quick and insightful read...definitely recommended.
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ggggary, November 2, 2006 (view all comments by ggggary)
This was a great book. I read 1984 published by Signet Classic and at the end of the book the afterward listed some utopias and some distopias. After reading 1984 and this being the possible insperation for the store I found it and read it. I think that the book had a different spin on the ideas of a world too orderly and the fact that it was writen from the first person perspective and was more like journal entries seemed to add a personal touch to the book. It's worth seeking and adding to your collection.
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(13 of 23 readers found this comment helpful)
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780140185850
Author:
Brown, Clarence
Author:
Zamiatin, Evgenii Ivanovich
Author:
Zamiatin, Yevgeny
Author:
Zamyatin, Yevgeny
Author:
Brown, Clarence
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Location:
New York, N.Y., U.S.A. :
Subject:
General
Subject:
Continental european fiction (fictional works
Subject:
Science Fiction - General
Subject:
Classics
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Science Fiction and Fantasy-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Series:
Penguin Twentieth Century Classics
Series Volume:
v. 1825
Publication Date:
19930831
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
7.88x5.00x.45 in. .41 lbs.
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Featured Titles » Genre
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Science Fiction and Fantasy » A to Z

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Product details 256 pages Penguin Books - English 9780140185850 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In a glass-enclosed city of absolute straight lines, nameless numbers, survivors of a devastating war, live out lives devoid of passion and creativity. Until D-503, a mathematician who dreams in numbers, makes a discovery: he has an individual soul. Reputedly the inspiration for Orwell's 1984.
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