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This title in other editions

Let Me Finish

by

Let Me Finish Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"[A] selective, meditative, bittersweet collection....Wistful, full of rich details of life in the 1930s and 1940s, and of midcentury times at the magazine....The quality of his prose and the tone of his voice make Angell a pleasure to read even when the material seems dutifully rather than passionately offered. And he remains a delightful raconteur..." Floyd Skloot, The Virginia Quarterly Review (read the entire VQR review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"Here, at home inside a Jane Austen novel, I passed my college weekends, carving Sunday roasts and getting the station wagon serviced, explaining the double finesse in bridge, lacing up ice skates, sharing by radio the fall of Paris and the night bombings of London...having fallen not just in love but into a family." — from Let Me Finish

Roger Angell has developed a broad and devoted following through his writings in the New Yorker and as the leading baseball writer of our time. Turning to more personal matters, he has produced a fresh form of auto-biography in this unsentimental look at his early days as a boy growing up in Prohibition-era New York with a remarkable father; a mother, Katherine White, who was a founding editor of the New Yorker; and a famous stepfather, the writer E. B. White. Intimate, funny, and moving portraits form the book's centerpiece as Angell remembers his eccentric relatives, his childhood love of baseball in the time of Ruth and Gehrig and DiMaggio, and his vivid colleagues during his long career as a New Yorker writer and editor. Infused with both pleasure and sadness, Angell's disarming memoir also evokes a sensuous attachment to life's better moments.

Review:

"Over the past few years, New Yorker readers have been treated to the occasional personal reflection from Angell, stepping outside his usual baseball beat to write about such intimacies as his passion for sailing or his childhood fascination with the movies. It's the family drama that's of most immediate interest, as Angell recalls the divorce of his parents, Ernest and Katherine Angell, and his mother's subsequent remarriage to E.B. White, affectionately known as Andy. Or perhaps readers will be more eager to hear about life at the New Yorker, especially since Angell admits, 'I no longer expect to write' much more about his fellow writers and editors than the miniature portraits collected here (but thankfully we do have such scenes as the visit he and S.J. Perelman paid to W. Somerset Maugham while vacationing in France in 1949). Whatever the subject, Angell writes with his customary elegance and modesty; 'I've kept quiet about my trifling army career all these years,' he says in one essay, just before spinning off a series of captivating anecdotes about his WWII service. The assembled pieces add up to a fine memoir." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Now in his mid-eighties, Roger Angell has had what he calls 'a life sheltered by privilege and engrossing work, and shot through with good luck.' His father was Ernest Angell, a distinguished Manhattan lawyer who 'put in great amounts of time with the American Civil Liberties Union,' and his mother was Katharine White, an equally distinguished editor at the New Yorker and author of a widely venerated... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"It is the perfect book to read with one of Angell's vodka martinis." New York Times

Review:

"What Angell writes...contains truths: about loyalty and love, about work and play, about getting on with the cards that life deals you. It's also a genuinely grown-up book, a rare gem indeed in our pubescent age." Washington Post

Review:

"It turns out that in between the innings spent at baseball stadiums, Angell has lived well. The details unfold gradually in these stories, without hurry, but in time they add up to a rich portrait of a quintessential American life." Baltimore Sun

Review:

"Read together, Angell's casuals are painstaking craft, one that stops time and...relinquishes it. He uses memory not as a statement but as a hypothesis." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"Let Me Finish doesn't break new ground in the field of autobiography and memoir, but it reads fresh, and unlike nearly all recollections of recent vintage, makes you wish the writer had gone on a bit longer." Chicago Sun-Times

Review:

"Angell's writing remains fresh, lively, and appealingly thoughtful." Library Journal

Review:

"[T]here is an endearing objectivity...and a lingering sense of bemused surprise that so much can be remembered so fondly." Booklist

Review:

"Graceful and deeply felt." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

A wry, witty, often tender memoir by a former New Yorker and Random House editor who has great tales of a life in words.

Synopsis:

A New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice

 

“At the epicenter of literary New York, Menaker is an irreverent guide to the publishing world’s inner workings . . . His own journey, compelled by his self-knowledge and sense of humor, elevates this memoir into more than witty chatter.” — Chicago Tribune

 

“Impossible to resist.” — Jennifer Egan, author of A Visit from the Goon Squad

 

In these pages Daniel Menaker brings us a “ruefully funny insider’s tour of the publishing world” (Vogue.com). Haunted by a self-doubt sharpened by his role in his brother’s unexpected death, he offers wry, hilarious observations on publishing, child-rearing, parent-losing, and the writing life. But as time passes, we witness a moving, thoughtful meditation on years well lived, well read, and well spent. Full of mistakes, perhaps. But full of effort, full of accomplishment, full of life.

 

“Tender, smart and witty, this book is truly unputdownable.” — Real Simple

 

“Energetic and exhilarating  . . . [Menaker’s] clever, fast-paced prose makes you stop and think and wonder.” — New York Times Book Review

 

“At once jaunty and erudite . . . The writing simply shines.” — San Francisco Chronicle

Synopsis:

A wry, witty, often tender memoir by a former New Yorker editor, magazine writer, and book publisher who offers great tales of a life in words Daniel Menaker started as a fact checker at The New Yorker in 1969. With luck, hard work, and the support of William Maxwell, he was eventually promoted to editor. Never beloved by William Shawn, he was advised early on to find a position elsewhere; he stayed for another twenty-four years. Now Menaker brings us a new view of life in that wonderfully strange place and beyond, throughout his more than forty years working to celebrate language and good writing. He tells us his own story, too—with irrepressible style and honesty—of a life spent persevering through often difficult, nearly always difficult-to-read, situations. Haunted by a self-doubt sharpened by his role in his brothers unexpected death, he offers wry, hilarious observations on publishing, child-rearing, parent-losing, and the writing life. But as time goes by, we witness something far beyond the incidental: a moving, thoughtful meditation on years well lived, well read, and well spent. Full of mistakes, perhaps. But full of effort, full of accomplishment, full of life.

About the Author

ROGER ANGELL joined The New Yorker as a fiction editor in 1962. He is the author of seven celebrated baseball books, including Game Time: A Baseball Companion. He lives in New York and Maine.

Table of Contents

Contents

 

Introduction  1

Romance  5

Movie ­Kid  21

The King of the ­Forest  29

Twice ­Christmas  52

Early ­Innings  57

Consultation  80

We Are Fam­-­ilee  92

Andy  113

Getting ­There  138

Dry ­Martini  156

Permanent ­Party  165

Ancient ­Mariner  194

La Vie en ­Rose  203

At the Comic Weekly  215

Working ­Types

Oh, ­Christ

Ms. ­Ulysses

G.B.

Here ­Below  257

Jake  272

Hard ­Lines  285

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

P Sweeney Tacoma, August 4, 2012 (view all comments by P Sweeney Tacoma)
Readers of the New Yorker are familiar with Roger Angell's writings from way back. Born in 1921, he has been a contributor and editor for more than 50 years. He's probably most famous for his articles on baseball and for the holiday poem, "Greetings, Friends," that he composed in rhyming couplets that mentioned the names of dozens of current celebrities, cleverly interlaced. And he is also famous as the son of Katharine Angell White & stepson of E.B. White, though he does not presume on the connection.

In this collection of essays, Roger has a lot to say to us about his many interests, friends, big-name acquaintances (Emily Hahn, V.S. Pritchett, A.J. Liebling), fellow-workers at the New Yorker, and relatives who did things as reckless as Aunt Elsie (attempting to out-talk Willa Cather about their respective works) or a great-grandfather who was garrotted in Fresno while trying to start a grape farm.

More important, he is an excellent writer with an extraordinary eye for detail and a gift for making every phrase tell. "I. . watched the soft globes of her headlights grow more distinct as she wheeled up quickly, the tires whispering on the wet road. She was wearing red duck pants and an oilskin top, its hood back behind her neck, and when she got out we looked at each other like conspirators." This, in a chapter called "Getting There" about a young man coming of age as he fumbles through various misadventures such as losing a woman's engagement ring (not his gift) on a golf course in the rain.

At a point in life where the pillars of my universe are crumbling all around me, Roger Angell still stands! I love his title, as all us old folks will. Yes, "Let Me Finish"! Pay attention! Some important things still need to be said!

Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780156032186
Author:
Angell, Roger
Publisher:
Harvest Books
Author:
Menaker, Daniel
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Editors, Journalists, Publishers
Subject:
United States - State & Local - Middle Atlantic
Subject:
HIS036080
Subject:
Biography - General
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20070631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
8 x 5.31 in 0.63 lb

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
History and Social Science » Journalism » General
History and Social Science » Journalism » Journalists
Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Baseball » General

Let Me Finish New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$18.95 In Stock
Product details 256 pages Harvest Books - English 9780156032186 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Over the past few years, New Yorker readers have been treated to the occasional personal reflection from Angell, stepping outside his usual baseball beat to write about such intimacies as his passion for sailing or his childhood fascination with the movies. It's the family drama that's of most immediate interest, as Angell recalls the divorce of his parents, Ernest and Katherine Angell, and his mother's subsequent remarriage to E.B. White, affectionately known as Andy. Or perhaps readers will be more eager to hear about life at the New Yorker, especially since Angell admits, 'I no longer expect to write' much more about his fellow writers and editors than the miniature portraits collected here (but thankfully we do have such scenes as the visit he and S.J. Perelman paid to W. Somerset Maugham while vacationing in France in 1949). Whatever the subject, Angell writes with his customary elegance and modesty; 'I've kept quiet about my trifling army career all these years,' he says in one essay, just before spinning off a series of captivating anecdotes about his WWII service. The assembled pieces add up to a fine memoir." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "[A] selective, meditative, bittersweet collection....Wistful, full of rich details of life in the 1930s and 1940s, and of midcentury times at the magazine....The quality of his prose and the tone of his voice make Angell a pleasure to read even when the material seems dutifully rather than passionately offered. And he remains a delightful raconteur..." (read the entire VQR review)
"Review" by , "It is the perfect book to read with one of Angell's vodka martinis."
"Review" by , "What Angell writes...contains truths: about loyalty and love, about work and play, about getting on with the cards that life deals you. It's also a genuinely grown-up book, a rare gem indeed in our pubescent age."
"Review" by , "It turns out that in between the innings spent at baseball stadiums, Angell has lived well. The details unfold gradually in these stories, without hurry, but in time they add up to a rich portrait of a quintessential American life."
"Review" by , "Read together, Angell's casuals are painstaking craft, one that stops time and...relinquishes it. He uses memory not as a statement but as a hypothesis."
"Review" by , "Let Me Finish doesn't break new ground in the field of autobiography and memoir, but it reads fresh, and unlike nearly all recollections of recent vintage, makes you wish the writer had gone on a bit longer."
"Review" by , "Angell's writing remains fresh, lively, and appealingly thoughtful."
"Review" by , "[T]here is an endearing objectivity...and a lingering sense of bemused surprise that so much can be remembered so fondly."
"Review" by , "Graceful and deeply felt."
"Synopsis" by , A wry, witty, often tender memoir by a former New Yorker and Random House editor who has great tales of a life in words.
"Synopsis" by ,
A New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice

 

“At the epicenter of literary New York, Menaker is an irreverent guide to the publishing world’s inner workings . . . His own journey, compelled by his self-knowledge and sense of humor, elevates this memoir into more than witty chatter.” — Chicago Tribune

 

“Impossible to resist.” — Jennifer Egan, author of A Visit from the Goon Squad

 

In these pages Daniel Menaker brings us a “ruefully funny insider’s tour of the publishing world” (Vogue.com). Haunted by a self-doubt sharpened by his role in his brother’s unexpected death, he offers wry, hilarious observations on publishing, child-rearing, parent-losing, and the writing life. But as time passes, we witness a moving, thoughtful meditation on years well lived, well read, and well spent. Full of mistakes, perhaps. But full of effort, full of accomplishment, full of life.

 

“Tender, smart and witty, this book is truly unputdownable.” — Real Simple

 

“Energetic and exhilarating  . . . [Menaker’s] clever, fast-paced prose makes you stop and think and wonder.” — New York Times Book Review

 

“At once jaunty and erudite . . . The writing simply shines.” — San Francisco Chronicle

"Synopsis" by , A wry, witty, often tender memoir by a former New Yorker editor, magazine writer, and book publisher who offers great tales of a life in words Daniel Menaker started as a fact checker at The New Yorker in 1969. With luck, hard work, and the support of William Maxwell, he was eventually promoted to editor. Never beloved by William Shawn, he was advised early on to find a position elsewhere; he stayed for another twenty-four years. Now Menaker brings us a new view of life in that wonderfully strange place and beyond, throughout his more than forty years working to celebrate language and good writing. He tells us his own story, too—with irrepressible style and honesty—of a life spent persevering through often difficult, nearly always difficult-to-read, situations. Haunted by a self-doubt sharpened by his role in his brothers unexpected death, he offers wry, hilarious observations on publishing, child-rearing, parent-losing, and the writing life. But as time goes by, we witness something far beyond the incidental: a moving, thoughtful meditation on years well lived, well read, and well spent. Full of mistakes, perhaps. But full of effort, full of accomplishment, full of life.
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