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Freud's Free Clinics: Psychoanalysis and Social Justice, 1918-1938

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

After World War I, Sigmund Freud, Wilhelm Reich, Erik Erikson, Karen Horney, Erich Fromm, Helene Deutsch, and other psychoanalysts created a network of free outpatient clinics and pioneered important innovations in psychoanalytic treatment and method. In this book, Elizabeth Ann Danto narrates how these psychoanalysts implemented their social activism and their commitment to treating the poor and working classes. She explores the successes and challenges faced by the Berlin Poliklinik, the Vienna Ambulatorium, Alfred Adler's child guidance clinics, and Wilhelm Reich's Sex-Pol, which provided free community-based counseling and sex education and aimed to end public repression of sexuality.

Synopsis:

Featuring many rarely seen photographs, this book overturns conventional wisdom about Freud and the founders of psychoanalysis.


Synopsis:

Elizabeth Danto rescues an obscure chapter from the history of psychoanalysis. This book shows Freud and the early psychoanalysts — Wilhelm Reich, Erik Erikson, Karen Horney, Erich Fromm, and Helene Deutsch, among others — to be social activists and visionaries, who viewed psychoanalysis as integral to creating a more egalitarian and democratic society. Danto details their efforts to build free clinics and make mental health treatment available to all, regardless of gender, social class, age, or occupation.

Synopsis:

Today many view Sigmund Freud as an elitist whose psychoanalytic treatment was reserved for the intellectually and financially advantaged. However, in this new work Elizabeth Ann Danto presents a strikingly different picture of Freud and the early psychoanalytic movement. Danto recovers the neglected history of Freud and other analysts' intense social activism and their commitment to treating the poor and working classes.

Danto's narrative begins in the years following the end of World War I and the fall of the Habsburg Empire. Joining with the social democratic and artistic movements that were sweeping across Central and Western Europe, analysts such as Freud, Wilhelm Reich, Erik Erikson, Karen Horney, Erich Fromm, and Helene Deutsch envisioned a new role for psychoanalysis. These psychoanalysts saw themselves as brokers of social change and viewed psychoanalysis as a challenge to conventional political and social traditions. Between 1920 and 1938 and in ten different cities, they created outpatient centers that provided free mental health care. They believed that psychoanalysis would share in the transformation of civil society and that these new outpatient centers would help restore people to their inherently good and productive selves.

Drawing on oral histories and new archival material, Danto offers vivid portraits of the movement's central figures and their beliefs. She explores the successes, failures, and challenges faced by free institutes such as the Berlin Poliklinik, the Vienna Ambulatorium, and Alfred Adler's child-guidance clinics. She also describes the efforts of Wilhelm Reich's Sex-Pol, a fusion of psychoanalysis and left-wing politics, which provided free counseling and sex education and aimed to end public repression of private sexuality.

In addition to situating the efforts of psychoanalysts in the political and cultural contexts of Weimar Germany and Red Vienna, Danto also discusses the important treatments and methods developed during this period, including child analysis, short-term therapy, crisis intervention, task-centered treatment, active therapy, and clinical case presentations. Her work illuminates the importance of the social environment and the idea of community to the theory and practice of psychoanalysis.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780231131803
Author:
Danto, Elizabeth Ann
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Subject:
History
Subject:
Psychoanalysis
Subject:
Movements - Psychoanalysis
Subject:
Psychoanalysis - Europe - History -
Subject:
Psychology -- History.
Publication Date:
20050431
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
9.54x5.88x.98 in. 1.33 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Freud
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » History
History and Social Science » Military » General History
History and Social Science » Politics » General
Reference » Science Reference » Technology
Religion » Comparative Religion » General

Freud's Free Clinics: Psychoanalysis and Social Justice, 1918-1938 New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$98.95 In Stock
Product details 352 pages Columbia University Press - English 9780231131803 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Featuring many rarely seen photographs, this book overturns conventional wisdom about Freud and the founders of psychoanalysis.


"Synopsis" by , Elizabeth Danto rescues an obscure chapter from the history of psychoanalysis. This book shows Freud and the early psychoanalysts — Wilhelm Reich, Erik Erikson, Karen Horney, Erich Fromm, and Helene Deutsch, among others — to be social activists and visionaries, who viewed psychoanalysis as integral to creating a more egalitarian and democratic society. Danto details their efforts to build free clinics and make mental health treatment available to all, regardless of gender, social class, age, or occupation.
"Synopsis" by , Today many view Sigmund Freud as an elitist whose psychoanalytic treatment was reserved for the intellectually and financially advantaged. However, in this new work Elizabeth Ann Danto presents a strikingly different picture of Freud and the early psychoanalytic movement. Danto recovers the neglected history of Freud and other analysts' intense social activism and their commitment to treating the poor and working classes.

Danto's narrative begins in the years following the end of World War I and the fall of the Habsburg Empire. Joining with the social democratic and artistic movements that were sweeping across Central and Western Europe, analysts such as Freud, Wilhelm Reich, Erik Erikson, Karen Horney, Erich Fromm, and Helene Deutsch envisioned a new role for psychoanalysis. These psychoanalysts saw themselves as brokers of social change and viewed psychoanalysis as a challenge to conventional political and social traditions. Between 1920 and 1938 and in ten different cities, they created outpatient centers that provided free mental health care. They believed that psychoanalysis would share in the transformation of civil society and that these new outpatient centers would help restore people to their inherently good and productive selves.

Drawing on oral histories and new archival material, Danto offers vivid portraits of the movement's central figures and their beliefs. She explores the successes, failures, and challenges faced by free institutes such as the Berlin Poliklinik, the Vienna Ambulatorium, and Alfred Adler's child-guidance clinics. She also describes the efforts of Wilhelm Reich's Sex-Pol, a fusion of psychoanalysis and left-wing politics, which provided free counseling and sex education and aimed to end public repression of private sexuality.

In addition to situating the efforts of psychoanalysts in the political and cultural contexts of Weimar Germany and Red Vienna, Danto also discusses the important treatments and methods developed during this period, including child analysis, short-term therapy, crisis intervention, task-centered treatment, active therapy, and clinical case presentations. Her work illuminates the importance of the social environment and the idea of community to the theory and practice of psychoanalysis.

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