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Hallucinations

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Hallucinations Cover

ISBN13: 9780307957245
ISBN10: 0307957241
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Have you ever seen something that wasn’t really there? Heard someone call your name in an empty house? Sensed someone following you and turned around to find nothing?

Hallucinations don’t belong wholly to the insane. Much more commonly, they are linked to sensory deprivation, intoxication, illness, or injury. People with migraines may see shimmering arcs of light or tiny, Lilliputian figures of animals and people. People with failing eyesight, paradoxically, may become immersed in a hallucinatory visual world. Hallucinations can be brought on by a simple fever or even the act of waking or falling asleep, when people have visions ranging from luminous blobs of color to beautifully detailed faces or terrifying ogres. Those who are bereaved may receive comforting “visits” from the departed. In some conditions, hallucinations can lead to religious epiphanies or even the feeling of leaving one’s own body.

Humans have always sought such life-changing visions, and for thousands of years have used hallucinogenic compounds to achieve them. As a young doctor in California in the 1960s, Oliver Sacks had both a personal and a professional interest in psychedelics. These, along with his early migraine experiences, launched a lifelong investigation into the varieties of hallucinatory experience.

Here, with his usual elegance, curiosity, and compassion, Dr. Sacks weaves together stories of his patients and of his own mind-altering experiences to illuminate what hallucinations tell us about the organization and structure of our brains, how they have influenced every culture’s folklore and art, and why the potential for hallucination is present in us all, a vital part of the human condition.

Review:

"We think of seeing — or hearing, smelling, touching or inchoately sensing — things that aren't there as a classic sign of madness, but it's really a human commonplace, according to Sacks's latest fascinating exploration of neuropsychiatric weirdness. Acclaimed neurologist Sacks (The Mind's Eye) investigates a wide range of hallucinations, from the geometric zigzags of some migraines and the painful cramps of phantom limbs to florid multicharacter melodramas, grotesque phantasms, and mystic trances induced by brain disorders and drugs. He also studies how people live with their hallucinations; some recognize them as just diverting figments while for others they constitute an inescapable unreality as malevolent and terrifying as a horror movie. (Sacks amply recounts his own entertaining hallucinations, including a drug-induced encounter with a spider who talked to him about Bertrand Russell.) As always, Sacks approaches the topic as both a brain scientist and a humanist; he shows how hallucinations elucidate intricate neurological mechanisms — often they are the brain's bizarre attempt to fill in for missing sensory input — and examines their imprint on folklore and culture. (Dostoyevski's fiction, he theorizes, is marked by the ecstatic religious trances induced by his epilepsy.) Writing with his trademark mix of evocative description, probing curiosity, and warm empathy, Sacks once again draws back the curtain on the mind's improbable workings. Agent: The Wylie Agency. (Nov. 6)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review:

“Effective — largely because Sacks never turns exploitative, instead sketching out each illness with compassion and thoughtful prose. A riveting look inside the human brain and its quirks.” Kirkus

Review:

"Sacks' best-selling nonfiction stories based on his practice of clinical neurology constitute one shining reason for thinking that we're living in a golden age of medical writing...Sacks defines the best of medical writing." Booklist

Review:

"Another gem of a book...With a fine sense of narrative, Sacks deftly integrates literature, art, and medical history around his very human, often riveting, case histories. This book is recommended for all readers, not just those with symptoms! This is a model of humane science made compellingly readable." Library Journal, starred review

Review:

"Wondrous." Elle

Review:

"Sacks' science writing is always revelatory, and there are moments in Hallucinations when seeing things can feel downright life-affirming." Time

Synopsis:

From the best-selling author of Musicophilia and The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, a provocative investigation into hallucinations — auditory, visual, tactile, olfactory — their many guises, their physiological sources, and their personal and cultural resonances.

Hallucinations, for most people, imply madness. But there are many different types of non-psychotic hallucination caused by various illnesses or injuries, by intoxication — even, for many people, by falling sleep. From the elementary geometrical shapes that we see when we rub our eyes to the complex swirls and blind spots and zigzags of a visual migraine, hallucination takes many forms. At a higher level, hallucinations associated with the altered states of consciousness that may come with sensory deprivation or certain brain disorders can lead to religious epiphanies or conversions. Drawing on a wealth of clinical examples from his own patients as well as historical and literary descriptions, Oliver Sacks investigates the fundamental differences and similarities of these many sorts of hallucinations, what they say about the organization and structure of our brains, how they have influenced every culture's folklore and art, and why the potential for hallucination is present in us all.

About the Author

Oliver Sacks is a professor of neurology and psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center and the author of many books, including Musicophilia, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, and Awakenings (which inspired the Oscar-nominated film).

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

WongKaiWen, December 24, 2012 (view all comments by WongKaiWen)
Really interesting book. An account of various forms of hallucinations from delirium to self-induced altered states. It not only reports on visual forms, but also delves into auditory hallucinations and phantom smells. It felt very complete and covered many common misconceptions about the variety of hallucinations. Not deeply scientific as to the specifics of how and why these things occur, but a relatively complete account of experiences nonetheless. He shares his findings with enough of an explanation that I felt both informed and consistently entertained, while not having to be a schooled in neuroscience to understand him. It gave a sound history and clarification of various hallucinatory occurrences without overwhelming me with jargon. Oliver Sacks has a way of writing in a way that feels very conversational, but doesn't underestimate his reader either. I really enjoyed this book.
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(5 of 6 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307957245
Author:
Sacks, Oliver
Publisher:
Knopf
Author:
Sacks, Oliver W.
Subject:
Neurology
Subject:
Biography - General
Subject:
General science
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20121106
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
8.53 x 5.77 x 1.25 in 1.22 lb

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Hallucinations Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$11.95 In Stock
Product details 352 pages Knopf Publishing Group - English 9780307957245 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "We think of seeing — or hearing, smelling, touching or inchoately sensing — things that aren't there as a classic sign of madness, but it's really a human commonplace, according to Sacks's latest fascinating exploration of neuropsychiatric weirdness. Acclaimed neurologist Sacks (The Mind's Eye) investigates a wide range of hallucinations, from the geometric zigzags of some migraines and the painful cramps of phantom limbs to florid multicharacter melodramas, grotesque phantasms, and mystic trances induced by brain disorders and drugs. He also studies how people live with their hallucinations; some recognize them as just diverting figments while for others they constitute an inescapable unreality as malevolent and terrifying as a horror movie. (Sacks amply recounts his own entertaining hallucinations, including a drug-induced encounter with a spider who talked to him about Bertrand Russell.) As always, Sacks approaches the topic as both a brain scientist and a humanist; he shows how hallucinations elucidate intricate neurological mechanisms — often they are the brain's bizarre attempt to fill in for missing sensory input — and examines their imprint on folklore and culture. (Dostoyevski's fiction, he theorizes, is marked by the ecstatic religious trances induced by his epilepsy.) Writing with his trademark mix of evocative description, probing curiosity, and warm empathy, Sacks once again draws back the curtain on the mind's improbable workings. Agent: The Wylie Agency. (Nov. 6)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Review" by , “Effective — largely because Sacks never turns exploitative, instead sketching out each illness with compassion and thoughtful prose. A riveting look inside the human brain and its quirks.”
"Review" by , "Sacks' best-selling nonfiction stories based on his practice of clinical neurology constitute one shining reason for thinking that we're living in a golden age of medical writing...Sacks defines the best of medical writing."
"Review" by , "Another gem of a book...With a fine sense of narrative, Sacks deftly integrates literature, art, and medical history around his very human, often riveting, case histories. This book is recommended for all readers, not just those with symptoms! This is a model of humane science made compellingly readable."
"Review" by , "Wondrous."
"Review" by , "Sacks' science writing is always revelatory, and there are moments in Hallucinations when seeing things can feel downright life-affirming."
"Synopsis" by , From the best-selling author of Musicophilia and The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, a provocative investigation into hallucinations — auditory, visual, tactile, olfactory — their many guises, their physiological sources, and their personal and cultural resonances.

Hallucinations, for most people, imply madness. But there are many different types of non-psychotic hallucination caused by various illnesses or injuries, by intoxication — even, for many people, by falling sleep. From the elementary geometrical shapes that we see when we rub our eyes to the complex swirls and blind spots and zigzags of a visual migraine, hallucination takes many forms. At a higher level, hallucinations associated with the altered states of consciousness that may come with sensory deprivation or certain brain disorders can lead to religious epiphanies or conversions. Drawing on a wealth of clinical examples from his own patients as well as historical and literary descriptions, Oliver Sacks investigates the fundamental differences and similarities of these many sorts of hallucinations, what they say about the organization and structure of our brains, how they have influenced every culture's folklore and art, and why the potential for hallucination is present in us all.

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