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This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War (Vintage Civil War Library)

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This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War (Vintage Civil War Library) Cover

ISBN13: 9780375703836
ISBN10: 0375703837
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

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Review-A-Day

"It was remarkable, and telling, that well-placed commentators could regard the attacks of September 11 as heralding an end of American 'innocence.' Whatever 'innocence' Americans could claim...was surely lost much earlier, in the 1860s, in the hills, woods, villages, and cornfields of their own country. During those years Americans slaughtered each other in great numbers in what we have come to call the Civil War, and as a consequence they encountered dying and death on a scale never attained before or since. That encounter, Drew Gilpin Faust tells us in her moving, disturbing, suggestive, and elegant book, would not only shock, but also transform, Americans and their nation in ways that resonate to this day." Steven Hahn, The New Republic (read the entire New Republic review)

"[A] remarkable work — poised, moving, irrigated with the flowing voices of mid-19th-century Americans. Their journals, letters, accounts, songs, sermons and scribblings have the gravitas to reach us across 14 decades, to touch upon our own preoccupations with an unexpectedly long war and the nature of national sacrifice." Karen Long, The Cleveland Plain Dealer (read the entire Plain Dealer review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

More than 600,000 soldiers lost their lives in the American Civil War. An equivalent proportion of today's population would be six million. In This Republic of Suffering, Drew Gilpin Faust reveals the ways that death on such a scale changed not only individual lives but the life of the nation, describing how the survivors managed on a practical level and how a deeply religious culture struggled to reconcile the unprecedented carnage with its belief in a benevolent God. Throughout, the voices of soldiers and their families, of statesmen, generals, preachers, poets, surgeons, nurses, northerners and southerners come together to give us a vivid understanding of the Civil War's most fundamental and widely shared reality.

Review:

"Professional military men of the late 19th century were generally unimpressed by America's Civil War. 'A contest in which huge armed rabbles chased each other around a vast wilderness,' Prussian Field Marshal Helmuth von Moltke contemptuously sniffed, concluding there was nothing for the world's armies to learn from such an unmilitary spectacle that had so little to do with the established art of... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"A shattering history of the war, focusing exclusively on death and dying-how Americans prepared for death, imagined it, risked it, endured it and worked to understand it." Los Angeles Times Book Review

Review:

"Penetrating....Faust exhumes a wealth of material...to flesh out her lucid account. The result is an insightful, often moving portrait of a people torn by grief." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"Faust is particularly qualified to identify and explain the complex social and political implications of the changing nature of death as America's internecine conflict attained its full dimensions." San Francisco Chronicle

Review:

"[An] astonishing new book." The New York Sun

Review:

"The beauty and originality of Faust's book is that it shows how thoroughly the work of mourning became the business of capitalism, merchandised throughout a society." Adam Gopnik, The New Yorker

Review:

"Fascinating, innovative....Faust returns to the task of stripping from war any lingering romanticism, nobility or social purpose." Eric Foner, The Nation

Review:

"Having always kept the war in her own scholarly sights, Faust offers a compelling reassertion of its basic importance in society and politics alike." Slate

Review:

"A moving work of social history, detailing how the Civil War changed perceptions and behaviors about death....An illuminating study." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

The president of Harvard University presents this innovative study of the American struggle to comprehend the meaning and consequences of death in the face of the unprecedented slaughter of the Civil War. 56 illustrations.

About the Author

Drew Gilpin Faust is president of Harvard University, where she also holds the Lincoln Professorship in History. Dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study from 2001 to 2007, she came to Harvard after twenty-five years on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of five previous books, including Mothers of Invention: Women of the Slaveholding South in the American Civil War, which won the Francis Parkman Prize and the Avery Craven Prize. She and her husband live in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Ashley Bowen, October 5, 2010 (view all comments by Ashley Bowen)
Faust's book is a must-read for anyone interested in how the Civil War impacted American culture. She writes beautifully of the way that death-- lots and lots of death-- hovered over America during the war and years after. I was especially interested in her analysis of the "noble" death in the Victorian era and how the Civil War changed what people thought it meant to die. She also makes the bureaucratization of war-death more fascinating than I thought possible. The book is depressing, it's about death after all, but well worth a read for those who are interested in the 19th century, cultural history, or Civil War life.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780375703836
Author:
Faust, Drew Gilpin
Publisher:
Vintage Books USA
Author:
Drew Gilpin
Author:
Faust
Subject:
United States - Civil War
Subject:
United States - History - Civil War, 1861-
Subject:
United States / Civil War Period (1850-1877)
Subject:
US History-1800 to Civil War
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Vintage Civil War Library
Publication Date:
January 2009
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
56 BandW
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
7.98x5.44x.76 in. .72 lbs.

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Related Subjects


History and Social Science » Military » Civil War » General
History and Social Science » Military » US Military » General
History and Social Science » Politics » Peace and War
History and Social Science » US History » 1800 to 1945
History and Social Science » US History » 1800 to Civil War

This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War (Vintage Civil War Library) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$11.50 In Stock
Product details 368 pages Vintage Books USA - English 9780375703836 Reviews:
"Review A Day" by , "It was remarkable, and telling, that well-placed commentators could regard the attacks of September 11 as heralding an end of American 'innocence.' Whatever 'innocence' Americans could claim...was surely lost much earlier, in the 1860s, in the hills, woods, villages, and cornfields of their own country. During those years Americans slaughtered each other in great numbers in what we have come to call the Civil War, and as a consequence they encountered dying and death on a scale never attained before or since. That encounter, Drew Gilpin Faust tells us in her moving, disturbing, suggestive, and elegant book, would not only shock, but also transform, Americans and their nation in ways that resonate to this day." (read the entire New Republic review)
"Review A Day" by , "[A] remarkable work — poised, moving, irrigated with the flowing voices of mid-19th-century Americans. Their journals, letters, accounts, songs, sermons and scribblings have the gravitas to reach us across 14 decades, to touch upon our own preoccupations with an unexpectedly long war and the nature of national sacrifice." (read the entire Plain Dealer review)
"Review" by , "A shattering history of the war, focusing exclusively on death and dying-how Americans prepared for death, imagined it, risked it, endured it and worked to understand it."
"Review" by , "Penetrating....Faust exhumes a wealth of material...to flesh out her lucid account. The result is an insightful, often moving portrait of a people torn by grief."
"Review" by , "Faust is particularly qualified to identify and explain the complex social and political implications of the changing nature of death as America's internecine conflict attained its full dimensions."
"Review" by , "[An] astonishing new book."
"Review" by , "The beauty and originality of Faust's book is that it shows how thoroughly the work of mourning became the business of capitalism, merchandised throughout a society."
"Review" by , "Fascinating, innovative....Faust returns to the task of stripping from war any lingering romanticism, nobility or social purpose."
"Review" by , "Having always kept the war in her own scholarly sights, Faust offers a compelling reassertion of its basic importance in society and politics alike."
"Review" by , "A moving work of social history, detailing how the Civil War changed perceptions and behaviors about death....An illuminating study."
"Synopsis" by , The president of Harvard University presents this innovative study of the American struggle to comprehend the meaning and consequences of death in the face of the unprecedented slaughter of the Civil War. 56 illustrations.
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