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1 Burnside Children's Middle Readers- General

Other titles in the Sixties Trilogy series:

Sixties Trilogy #01: Countdown

by

Sixties Trilogy #01: Countdown Cover

ISBN13: 9780545106054
ISBN10: 0545106052
Condition: Ex-Library
Dustjacket: Ex-library
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $6.50!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

This gem of a novel takes place in Pittsburgh in 1952. Franny Katzenback, while recovering from polio, reads and falls in love with the brand-new book Charlotte’s Web. Bored and lonely and yearning for a Charlotte of her own, Franny starts up a correspondence with an eloquent flea named Fleabrain who lives on her dog’s tail. While Franny struggles with physical therapy and feeling left out of her formerly active neighborhood life, Fleabrain is there to take her on adventures based on his extensive reading. It’s a touching, funny story set in the recent past, told with Rocklin’s signature wit and thoughtfulness.

Praise for Fleabrain Loves Franny

"Heartwarming and endlessly funny, Fleabrain Loves Franny will delight readers of all ages. Rocklin’s sharp wit and exuberant writing style are refreshing. This book is not to be missed."

--VOYA

"Franny—a compassionate, thoughtful and sympathetic protagonist—is believably erratic in her emotions and reflections on her illness and its effects on her previously carefree life."

--Publishers Weekly

"Rocklin perfectly captures the era of 1952 and creates a sympathetic, realistic character in Franny, who begins to accept her condition, rejoin her friends and even protest her school’s inaccessibility."

--Kirkus Reviews

"Comedic and philosophical, readers will find multiple levels to enjoy."

--School Library Journal

 

Review:

"Wiles heads north from her familiar Mississippi terrain (Each Little Bird That Sings) for this 'documentary novel' set in Maryland during the Cuban missile crisis. Eleven-year-old Franny, a middle child, is in the thick of it — her father (like Wiles's was) is a pilot stationed at Andrews Air Force Base. Wiles palpably recreates the fear kids felt when air-raid sirens and duck-and-cover drills were routine, and when watching President Kennedy's televised speech announcing the presence of missiles in Cuba was an extra-credit assignment. Home life offers scant refuge. Franny's beloved older sister is keeping secrets and regularly disappearing; her mother's ordered household is upended by the increasingly erratic behavior of Uncle Otts (a WWI veteran); and Franny's relationship with her best friend Margie is on the brink as both vie for the same boy's attention. Interwoven with Franny's first-person, present-tense narration are period photographs, newspaper clippings, excerpts from informational pamphlets (how to build a bomb shelter), advertisements, song lyrics, and short biographical vignettes written in past tense about important figures of the cold war/civil rights era — Harry S. Truman, Fannie Lou Hamer, Pete Seeger. The back-and-forth is occasionally dizzying, but the striking design and heavy emphasis on primary source material may draw in graphic novel fans. Culminating with Franny's revelation that 'It's not the calamity that's the hard part. It's figuring out how to love one another through it,' this story is sure to strike a chord with those living through tough times today. Ages 9 — 12. National Poetry Month may be coming to a close, but these books should please young poetry lovers year-round." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Cold War anxieties play out in a sensitively told story set during the Cuban missile crisis in the 1960s, perfect for fans of Gary Schmidt and Kristin Levine. 

Joanna cant get over how her brother broke his promise to never leave like their dad did. Sam is thousands of miles away on a navy ship, and no matter how often he sends letters, Joanna refuses to write back. When she makes a promise, she keeps it.

But then President Kennedy comes on TV with frightening news about Soviet missiles in Cuba—and thats where Sams heading. Suddenly Joannas worries about being home alone, building up the courage to talk to a cute boy, and not being allowed to go to the first boy-girl party in her grade dont seem so important. Maybe sometimes there are good reasons to break a promise.

The tense timeline of the Cuban missile crisis unfolds alongside a powerful, and ultimately hopeful, story about what it means to grow up in a world full of uncertainty.

Synopsis:

The story of a formative year in 12-year-old Franny Chapman's life, and the life of a nation facing the threat of nuclear war.

It's 1962, and it seems everyone is living in fear. Twelve-year-old Franny Chapman lives with her family in Washington, DC, during the days surrounding the Cuban Missile Crisis. Amidst the pervasive threat of nuclear war, Franny must face the tension between herself and her younger brother, figure out where she fits in with her family, and look beyond outward appearances. For Franny, as for all Americans, it's going to be a formative year.

Video

About the Author

Deborah Wiles is the author of the picture book Freedom Summer and three novels: Love, Ruby Lavender; The Aurora County All-Stars; and Each Little Bird That Sings, a National Book Award finalist. She has vivid memories of ducking and covering under her school desk during air raid drills at the time of the Cuban Missile Crisis. She also sang in the Glee Club, was a champion speller, and hated Field Day. Deborah lives in Atlanta, Georgia. You can visit her on the web at www.deborahwiles.com.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

Kassie, August 4, 2012 (view all comments by Kassie)
Take a trip back in time, complete with breaking news, features on people and events, and favorite 45s you may be too young to have owned, but wish you had. Through the eyes of a young girl experience the constant, overwhelming strain the cold war places on a military family living too close to D.C. for comfort along with the growing pains of elementary school, college, and parenting. This is a terrific take on history that teens and tweens can get into, and a great reminder for the rest of us of a time of fear and struggle for equality.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
chadzdroik, January 12, 2011 (view all comments by chadzdroik)
Countdown, the first in the planned Sixties Trilogy, is often brilliant, funny and moving. The second you crack open its vibrant, golden cover featuring a 45 (read: it's like a CD), you find yourself immersed in a land of penny loafers, the VW bug, Del Shannon, hope chests, 'duck-and-cover' drills, John F. Kennedy, and one 11-year-old Franny Chapman: it's 1962, and author Wiles brilliantly paints a rich, intimate canvas of a time in our history that would forever change our history--and while the time is very specific, the story is timeless. The characters are just as richly drawn as the setting, and you'll feel yourself counting down to the next book in the series the second you finish. Serious themes, such as the assassination of JFK, the struggle for equal rights and, most dominantly, the Cuban Missile Crisis and the threat of nuclear war, are explored throughout the story's pages and through intercalory documentary-esque passages with footage in the form of photographs, advertisements, quotes and song lyrics from the time period. This book is not to be missed!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Spicyreads, February 23, 2010 (view all comments by Spicyreads)
Ground breaking book that will forever change the way we think of historical fiction!

http://tinyurl.com/yge8guw
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
View all 3 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780545106054
Author:
Wiles, Deborah
Publisher:
Scholastic Press
Author:
Rosengren, Gayle
Author:
Rocklin, Joanne
Subject:
Family - General
Subject:
Historical - United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Girls
Subject:
Cuban missile crisis, 1962
Subject:
Children s-General
Subject:
Children s-Historical Fiction-U.S. 20th Century
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Sixties Trilogy
Series Volume:
01
Publication Date:
20100531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 3 up to 7
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in
Age Level:
09-12

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Related Subjects


Children's » Awards » Oregon Reader's Choice Award
Children's » General
Children's » Historical Fiction
Children's » Historical Fiction » United States » 20th Century
Children's » Middle Readers » General
Young Adult » General

Sixties Trilogy #01: Countdown Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.50 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Scholastic Press - English 9780545106054 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Wiles heads north from her familiar Mississippi terrain (Each Little Bird That Sings) for this 'documentary novel' set in Maryland during the Cuban missile crisis. Eleven-year-old Franny, a middle child, is in the thick of it — her father (like Wiles's was) is a pilot stationed at Andrews Air Force Base. Wiles palpably recreates the fear kids felt when air-raid sirens and duck-and-cover drills were routine, and when watching President Kennedy's televised speech announcing the presence of missiles in Cuba was an extra-credit assignment. Home life offers scant refuge. Franny's beloved older sister is keeping secrets and regularly disappearing; her mother's ordered household is upended by the increasingly erratic behavior of Uncle Otts (a WWI veteran); and Franny's relationship with her best friend Margie is on the brink as both vie for the same boy's attention. Interwoven with Franny's first-person, present-tense narration are period photographs, newspaper clippings, excerpts from informational pamphlets (how to build a bomb shelter), advertisements, song lyrics, and short biographical vignettes written in past tense about important figures of the cold war/civil rights era — Harry S. Truman, Fannie Lou Hamer, Pete Seeger. The back-and-forth is occasionally dizzying, but the striking design and heavy emphasis on primary source material may draw in graphic novel fans. Culminating with Franny's revelation that 'It's not the calamity that's the hard part. It's figuring out how to love one another through it,' this story is sure to strike a chord with those living through tough times today. Ages 9 — 12. National Poetry Month may be coming to a close, but these books should please young poetry lovers year-round." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
Cold War anxieties play out in a sensitively told story set during the Cuban missile crisis in the 1960s, perfect for fans of Gary Schmidt and Kristin Levine. 

Joanna cant get over how her brother broke his promise to never leave like their dad did. Sam is thousands of miles away on a navy ship, and no matter how often he sends letters, Joanna refuses to write back. When she makes a promise, she keeps it.

But then President Kennedy comes on TV with frightening news about Soviet missiles in Cuba—and thats where Sams heading. Suddenly Joannas worries about being home alone, building up the courage to talk to a cute boy, and not being allowed to go to the first boy-girl party in her grade dont seem so important. Maybe sometimes there are good reasons to break a promise.

The tense timeline of the Cuban missile crisis unfolds alongside a powerful, and ultimately hopeful, story about what it means to grow up in a world full of uncertainty.

"Synopsis" by ,
The story of a formative year in 12-year-old Franny Chapman's life, and the life of a nation facing the threat of nuclear war.

It's 1962, and it seems everyone is living in fear. Twelve-year-old Franny Chapman lives with her family in Washington, DC, during the days surrounding the Cuban Missile Crisis. Amidst the pervasive threat of nuclear war, Franny must face the tension between herself and her younger brother, figure out where she fits in with her family, and look beyond outward appearances. For Franny, as for all Americans, it's going to be a formative year.

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