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Child Made of Sand: Poems

by

Child Made of Sand: Poems Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Cradle Place is the new collection from Thomas Lux, a self-described "recovering surrealist" and winner of the Kingsley Tufts Award.

These fifty-two poems bring to full life the "refreshing iconoclasms" Rita Dove so admired in Lux's earlier work. His voice is plainspoken but moody, humorous and edgy, and ever surprising.

These are philosophical poems that ask questions about language and intention, about the sometimes untidy connections between the human and natural worlds. In the poem "Terminal Lake," Lux undermines notions of benign nature, finding dark currents beneath the surface: "it's a huge black coin, / it's as if the real lake is drained / and this lake is the drain: gaping, language- / less, suck- and sinkhole." In the ominous "Render, Render," the narrator asks us to consider a concentration of the essences of our lives: all that is physical, spiritual, remembered, and dreamed for, melded together to make the messy self we present to the world.

Lux's voice is intelligent without being bookish, urgent and unrelentingly evocative. He has long been a strong advocate for the relevance of poetry in American culture. The Los Angeles Times praises Lux for his "compelling rhythms, his biting irony, and his steady devotion to a craft that often seems thankless." As Sven Birkerts noted, "Lux may be one of the poets on whom the future of the genre depends."

Synopsis:

In Child Made of Sand, Kingsley Tufts-winner Thomas Lux demonstrates a restless energy to explore new territory while confirming his place in the pantheon of contemporary American poetry.

Synopsis:

The Street of Clocks, Thomas Lux's first all-new collection since 1994, is a significant addition to the work of an utterly original, highly accomplished poet. The poems gathered here are delivered by a narrator who both loves the world and has intense quarrels with it. Often set against vivid landscapes - the rural America of Lux's childhood and unidentified places south of the border - these poems speak from rivers and swamps, deserts and lawns, jungles and the depths of the sea.

Synopsis:

God Particles displays the distinctive originality and unpredictability that prompted the Washington Post Book World to name Lux one of this generations most gifted poets. A satiric edge, tempered by profound compassion, cuts through many of the poems in Luxs book. While themes of intolerance, inhumanity, loss, and a deep sense of mortality mark these poems, a lighthearted grace instills even the somberest moments with unexpected sweetness. In the title poem Lux writes, “theres no reason for God to feel guilt / I think He was downhearted, weary, too weary / to be angry anymore . . . / He wanted each of us, / and all the things we touch . . . / to have a tiny piece of Him / though we are unqualified, / of even the crumb of a crumb.” Dark, humorous, and strikingly imaginative, this is Luxs most compassionate work to date.

Synopsis:

One of the New York Public Library's 25 "Books to Remember" in 1997 Lux comments on the absurd, the pathetic, and the commonplace in our culture, writing with compassion as well as satire. He is "singular among his peers in his ability to convey with a deceptive lightness the paradoxes of human emotion," says Publishers Weekly, and Robert Hass, in the Washington Post Book World, takes special note of Lux's "bitter wit, the kind of irony that comes with a quick, impatient intelligence."

Synopsis:

A new collection of poems by the recent Poet Laureate.

Synopsis:

In his first volume of poetry since his tenure as poet laureate, Charles Simic shows he is at the height of his poetic powers. These new poems mine the rich strain of inscrutability in ordinary life, until it is hard to know what is innocent and what ominous. There is something about his work that continues to be crystal clear and yet deeply weighted with violence and mystery. Reading it is like going undercover. The face of a girl carrying a white dress from the cleaners with her eyes half-closed. The Adam & Evie Tanning Salon at night. A sparrow on crutches. A rubber duck in a shooting gallery on a Sunday morning. And someone in a tree swing, too old to be swinging and to be wearing no clothes at all, blowing a toy trumpet at the sky.

Synopsis:

The poems gathered in THE STREET OF CLOCKS are lyrical monologues urgently delivered by a narrator who both loves the world and has intense quarrels with it. Often set against a vivid landscape--the rural America of Thomas Lux's childhood and unidentified places south of the border--these poems speak with mesmerizing intensity from rivers and swamps, deserts and lawns, jungles and the depths of the sea. They address the snakes, parrots, or sand fleas living there, as well as their human cohabitants, who are sometimes benign, as in the beautiful title poem ("Meet me there, you remember, the corner / of Paris and Porter"), and sometimes emphatically not so. The language is distilled and musical, lucid and strange, playful and dead serious, and always specific. Thomas Lux's first all-new volume in seven years is a significant addition to the work of an utterly original, highly accomplished poet. As Sven Birkerts has written, "Lux may be one of the poets on whom the future of the genre depends. He has the stuff to win readers back from their unhappy places of exile."

About the Author

Thomas Lux holds the Bourne Chair in Poetry and is the director of the McEver Visiting Writers Program at Georgia Institute of Technology. He has been awarded three NEA grants and the Kingsley Tufts Award and is a former Guggenheim Fellow. He lives in Atlanta.

Table of Contents

I

The Moths Who Come in the Night to Drink Our Tears 3

The Little Three-Handed Engine That Could 4

The Chairman of Naught 6

You and Your Ilk 7

The Drunken Forest 8

The Underappreciated Pontooniers 9

Nietzsche Throws His Arms Around the Neck of a Dray Horse 10

Scriptus Interruptus 11

A Frozen Ball of Rattlesnakes 12

The Queen of Truth 13

A Delivery of Dung 14

II

Elegy 19

Since Death and Its Sequelae 20

Every Time Someone Masturbates God Kills a Kitten 22

West Shining Tree 23

From Whom All Blessings Flow 24

The Probabilist 26

Rue de la Vieille Lanterne 27

Like Tiny Baby Jesus, in Velour Pants, Sliding down

Your Throat (A Belgian Euphemism) 28

Not the Same Kind of Mud as in “Two Tramps in Mud Time” 30

Ermine Noose 31

Why 32

III

Madsong 35

The Riverine Farmers 36

The Anti-Lunarian League 38

Penultimatum 39

Boy Born with Small Knife in His Head 40

Graves Rented by the Hour 41

Dendrochronologist Blues 42

The Goldfish Room (Where the Cops

Beat You in the Head with a Phonebook) 44

The River of Nuts 46

Baby Madsong 48

IV

Hatrack 51

Fishing 52

Soup Teachers, 54

The Hunchback Farmhand 55

Ladys Slipper 56

Bricks Sinking in Deep Water 57

Dead Horse 58

Fox 60

A Walk in the Woods with Shotguns 62

Outline for My Memoir 64

Product Details

ISBN:
9780547580982
Subtitle:
Poems
Author:
Lux, Thomas
Author:
Simic, Charles
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Subject:
Single Author / American
Subject:
Poetry-A to Z
Subject:
General Poetry
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20080317
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Language:
English
Pages:
80
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1 lb

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z

Child Made of Sand: Poems Sale Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$11.98 In Stock
Product details 80 pages Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH) - English 9780547580982 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In Child Made of Sand, Kingsley Tufts-winner Thomas Lux demonstrates a restless energy to explore new territory while confirming his place in the pantheon of contemporary American poetry.
"Synopsis" by ,
The Street of Clocks, Thomas Lux's first all-new collection since 1994, is a significant addition to the work of an utterly original, highly accomplished poet. The poems gathered here are delivered by a narrator who both loves the world and has intense quarrels with it. Often set against vivid landscapes - the rural America of Lux's childhood and unidentified places south of the border - these poems speak from rivers and swamps, deserts and lawns, jungles and the depths of the sea.
"Synopsis" by ,
God Particles displays the distinctive originality and unpredictability that prompted the Washington Post Book World to name Lux one of this generations most gifted poets. A satiric edge, tempered by profound compassion, cuts through many of the poems in Luxs book. While themes of intolerance, inhumanity, loss, and a deep sense of mortality mark these poems, a lighthearted grace instills even the somberest moments with unexpected sweetness. In the title poem Lux writes, “theres no reason for God to feel guilt / I think He was downhearted, weary, too weary / to be angry anymore . . . / He wanted each of us, / and all the things we touch . . . / to have a tiny piece of Him / though we are unqualified, / of even the crumb of a crumb.” Dark, humorous, and strikingly imaginative, this is Luxs most compassionate work to date.
"Synopsis" by ,
One of the New York Public Library's 25 "Books to Remember" in 1997 Lux comments on the absurd, the pathetic, and the commonplace in our culture, writing with compassion as well as satire. He is "singular among his peers in his ability to convey with a deceptive lightness the paradoxes of human emotion," says Publishers Weekly, and Robert Hass, in the Washington Post Book World, takes special note of Lux's "bitter wit, the kind of irony that comes with a quick, impatient intelligence."
"Synopsis" by ,
A new collection of poems by the recent Poet Laureate.
"Synopsis" by , In his first volume of poetry since his tenure as poet laureate, Charles Simic shows he is at the height of his poetic powers. These new poems mine the rich strain of inscrutability in ordinary life, until it is hard to know what is innocent and what ominous. There is something about his work that continues to be crystal clear and yet deeply weighted with violence and mystery. Reading it is like going undercover. The face of a girl carrying a white dress from the cleaners with her eyes half-closed. The Adam & Evie Tanning Salon at night. A sparrow on crutches. A rubber duck in a shooting gallery on a Sunday morning. And someone in a tree swing, too old to be swinging and to be wearing no clothes at all, blowing a toy trumpet at the sky.
"Synopsis" by ,
The poems gathered in THE STREET OF CLOCKS are lyrical monologues urgently delivered by a narrator who both loves the world and has intense quarrels with it. Often set against a vivid landscape--the rural America of Thomas Lux's childhood and unidentified places south of the border--these poems speak with mesmerizing intensity from rivers and swamps, deserts and lawns, jungles and the depths of the sea. They address the snakes, parrots, or sand fleas living there, as well as their human cohabitants, who are sometimes benign, as in the beautiful title poem ("Meet me there, you remember, the corner / of Paris and Porter"), and sometimes emphatically not so. The language is distilled and musical, lucid and strange, playful and dead serious, and always specific. Thomas Lux's first all-new volume in seven years is a significant addition to the work of an utterly original, highly accomplished poet. As Sven Birkerts has written, "Lux may be one of the poets on whom the future of the genre depends. He has the stuff to win readers back from their unhappy places of exile."
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