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Destructive Emotions: A Scientific Dialogue with the Dalai Lama

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Destructive Emotions: A Scientific Dialogue with the Dalai Lama Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

1. How might your own group discussion of Destructive Emotions mirror the one described in the book? What areas of expertise and life experience do your group members bring to the topic?

2. In his foreword to the book, the Dalai Lama writes, “When there is no place for justice and honesty in peoples hearts, the weak are the first to suffer. And the resentments resulting from such inequity ultimately affect everyone adversely.” In concrete terms, how does this translate into action on an individual level?

3. “The Lama in the Lab” raises the debate of medication versus meditation in the quest to eliminate destructive emotions. Compare and contrast these two approaches, particularly in terms of the cutting-edge research performed in Madison.

4. Discuss the various styles of Tibetan meditation engaged in by Lama “Öser” and the fact that distinctions between these styles were clearly reflected in his MRI. Do you consider mechanized studies of the brain to be at odds with or complementary to Buddhist tenets? Does quantifying brain images miss the point of meditation, or enhance the experience of it?

5. What did you discover about the Dalai Lamas life story, especially his education and exile? How do these experiences appear to have shaped his perspective on destructive emotions, on both personal levels (his admission to an initial fear of flying) and far-reaching political ones?

6. Discuss the three poisons (craving, anger, and delusion) that Buddhist philosophy tells us are the root of all unhappiness and conflict. What do the worlds most prevalent religions teach about such “poisons?” What do the images in Western media and culture convey about them?

7. Semantics proved to be a particularly interesting facet of these multi-lingual dialogues. How do you personally define the following concepts: compassion, ethics, mood, and mindfulness?

8. Do you believe that the mind drives the brain, or vice versa? What is your opinion in the debate over whether emotions serve an evolutionary purpose?

9. What do you make of the story in Chapter Twelve, in the section entitled “Counteracting Cruelty,” in which the Buddha asserts that some people are untrainable because he can only lead them as far as their previous karma would allow? Is the concept of karma refuted by evidence of neural plasticity and the protean brain?

10. How are we to distinguish between exaggerated, destructive self-esteem and the beneficial variety? What is the most important “audience” for our actions in Western society, as compared to, for example, Asian reverence for parents and elders? Why does the Dalai Lama apparently resist such discussions of cultural distinctions?

11. The presence of renowned neuroscientist Francisco Varela, who among other challenges suffered exile under Pinochet, added a poignant dimension to the dialogue. What does his life teach us about the nature of suffering? What does his death teach us about the mind and morality?

12. Describe your own destructive emotions. How do they manifest themselves? What did the book indicate about their possible origins? What antidotes might you try in order to soothe these emotions? How can your experience be extrapolated to the destructive incidents in your community and in the world at large?

13. Would other forms of spirituality lend themselves to the sorts of dialogues sponsored by the Mind Life Institute? How might the discussion have changed had a Hindu, Muslim, or Christian leader sat in place of the Dalai Lama during the dialogues on destructive emotions? What benefits does the book describe in having a philosopher present to “fill the gap.”

14. Review the recommendations asserted in Destructive Emotions, including Paths, modeling compassion, embracing the tranquilizing effects of empathy and generosity, meditating (especially with regard to a possible tipping point at fourteen hours), and easing the suffering of every living creature, even an insect or a fish. Having read the points of view from a variety of preeminent thinkers on the topic of destructive emotions, what is your personal response to the question posed in the books subtitle, “How Can We Overcome Them?”

Synopsis:

*Why do seemingly rational, intelligent people commit acts of cruelty and violence?

*What are the root causes of destructive behavior?

*How can we control the emotions that drive these impulses?

*Can we learn to live at peace with ourselves and others?

Imagine sitting with the Dalai Lama in his private meeting room with a small group of world-class scientists and philosophers. The talk is lively and fascinating as these leading minds grapple with age-old questions of compelling contemporary urgency. Daniel Goleman, the internationally bestselling author of Emotional Intelligence, provides the illuminating commentaryand reports on the breakthrough research this historic gathering inspired.

Destructive Emotions

Buddhist philosophy tells us that all personal unhappiness and interpersonal conflict lie in the “three poisons”: craving, anger, and delusion. It also provides antidotes of astonishing psychological sophistication--which are now being confirmed by modern neuroscience. With new high-tech devices, scientists can peer inside the brain centers that calm the inner storms of rage and fear. They also can demonstrate that awareness-training strategies such as meditation strengthen emotional stabilityand greatly enhance our positive moods.

The distinguished panel members report these recent findings and debate an exhilarating range of other topics: What role do destructive emotions play in human evolution? Are they “hardwired” in our bodies? Are they universal, or does culture determine how we feel? How can we nurture the compassion that is also our birthright? We learn how practices that reduce negativity have also been shown to bolster the immune system. Here, too, is an enlightened proposal for a school-based program of social and emotional learning that can help our children increase self-awareness, manage their anger, and become more empathetic.

Throughout, these provocative ideas are brought to life by the play of personalities, by the Dalai Lamas probing questions, and by his surprising sense of humor. Although there are no easy answers, the dialogues, which are part of a series sponsored by the Mind and Life Institute, chart an ultimately hopeful course. They are sure to spark discussion among educators, religious and political leaders, parentsand all people who seek peace for themselves and the world.

The Mind and Life Institute sponsors cross-cultural dialogues that bring together the Dalai Lama and other Buddhist scholars with Western scientists and philosophers. Mind and Life VIII, on which this book is based, took place in Dharamsala, India, in March 2000.

Synopsis:

*Why do seemingly rational, intelligent people commit acts of cruelty and violence?

*What are the root causes of destructive behavior?

*How can we control the emotions that drive these impulses?

*Can we learn to live at peace with ourselves and others?

Imagine sitting with the Dalai Lama in his private meeting room with a small group of world-class scientists and philosophers. The talk is lively and fascinating as these leading minds grapple with age-old questions of compelling contemporary urgency. Daniel Goleman, the internationally bestselling author of Emotional Intelligence, provides the illuminating commentary—and reports on the breakthrough research this historic gathering inspired.

Destructive Emotions

Buddhist philosophy tells us that all personal unhappiness and interpersonal conflict lie in the “three poisons”: craving, anger, and delusion. It also provides antidotes of astonishing psychological sophistication--which are now being confirmed by modern neuroscience. With new high-tech devices, scientists can peer inside the brain centers that calm the inner storms of rage and fear. They also can demonstrate that awareness-training strategies such as meditation strengthen emotional stability—and greatly enhance our positive moods.

The distinguished panel members report these recent findings and debate an exhilarating range of other topics: What role do destructive emotions play in human evolution? Are they “hardwired” in our bodies? Are they universal, or does culture determine how we feel? How can we nurture the compassion that is also our birthright? We learn how practices that reduce negativity have also been shown to bolster the immune system. Here, too, is an enlightened proposal for a school-based program of social and emotional learning that can help our children increase self-awareness, manage their anger, and become more empathetic.

Throughout, these provocative ideas are brought to life by the play of personalities, by the Dalai Lamas probing questions, and by his surprising sense of humor. Although there are no easy answers, the dialogues, which are part of a series sponsored by the Mind and Life Institute, chart an ultimately hopeful course. They are sure to spark discussion among educators, religious and political leaders, parents—and all people who seek peace for themselves and the world.

The Mind and Life Institute sponsors cross-cultural dialogues that bring together the Dalai Lama and other Buddhist scholars with Western scientists and philosophers. Mind and Life VIII, on which this book is based, took place in Dharamsala, India, in March 2000.

About the Author

Daniel Goleman, PH.D. is also the author of the worldwide bestseller Working with Emotional Intelligence and is co-author of Primal Leadership: Learning to Lead with Emotional Intelligence, written with Richard Boyatzis and Annie McKee.

Dr. Goleman received his Ph.D. from Harvard and reported on the brain and behavioral sciences for The New York Times for twelve years, where he was twice nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. He was awarded the American Psychological Association's Lifetime Achievement Award and is currently a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science His other books include Destructive Emotions, The Meditative Mind, The Creative Spirit, and Vital Lies, Simple Truths.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780553381054
Narrated:
Goleman, Daniel
Foreword:
Dalai Lama
Narrated by:
Goleman, Daniel P.
Narrated:
Goleman, Daniel
Narrated:
Goleman, Daniel P.
Foreword by:
Dalai Lama
Foreword:
Dalai Lama
Author:
Goleman, Daniel P.
Author:
Goleman, Daniel
Author:
Daniel Goleman, Ph.D.
Publisher:
Bantam
Subject:
Emotions
Subject:
Buddhist
Subject:
Buddhism - Tibetan
Subject:
Eastern - Buddhism
Subject:
Spiritual life
Subject:
Psychology and religion
Subject:
Psychology-Mood Disorders and Depression
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20040331
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
448
Dimensions:
9.22x6.10x.97 in. .97 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Psychology » General
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Mood Disorders and Depression
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Humanities » Philosophy » General
Religion » Eastern Religions » Buddhism » General
Religion » Eastern Religions » Buddhism » Tibetan Buddhism

Destructive Emotions: A Scientific Dialogue with the Dalai Lama Used Trade Paper
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Product details 448 pages Bantam Books - English 9780553381054 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , *Why do seemingly rational, intelligent people commit acts of cruelty and violence?

*What are the root causes of destructive behavior?

*How can we control the emotions that drive these impulses?

*Can we learn to live at peace with ourselves and others?

Imagine sitting with the Dalai Lama in his private meeting room with a small group of world-class scientists and philosophers. The talk is lively and fascinating as these leading minds grapple with age-old questions of compelling contemporary urgency. Daniel Goleman, the internationally bestselling author of Emotional Intelligence, provides the illuminating commentaryand reports on the breakthrough research this historic gathering inspired.

Destructive Emotions

Buddhist philosophy tells us that all personal unhappiness and interpersonal conflict lie in the “three poisons”: craving, anger, and delusion. It also provides antidotes of astonishing psychological sophistication--which are now being confirmed by modern neuroscience. With new high-tech devices, scientists can peer inside the brain centers that calm the inner storms of rage and fear. They also can demonstrate that awareness-training strategies such as meditation strengthen emotional stabilityand greatly enhance our positive moods.

The distinguished panel members report these recent findings and debate an exhilarating range of other topics: What role do destructive emotions play in human evolution? Are they “hardwired” in our bodies? Are they universal, or does culture determine how we feel? How can we nurture the compassion that is also our birthright? We learn how practices that reduce negativity have also been shown to bolster the immune system. Here, too, is an enlightened proposal for a school-based program of social and emotional learning that can help our children increase self-awareness, manage their anger, and become more empathetic.

Throughout, these provocative ideas are brought to life by the play of personalities, by the Dalai Lamas probing questions, and by his surprising sense of humor. Although there are no easy answers, the dialogues, which are part of a series sponsored by the Mind and Life Institute, chart an ultimately hopeful course. They are sure to spark discussion among educators, religious and political leaders, parentsand all people who seek peace for themselves and the world.

The Mind and Life Institute sponsors cross-cultural dialogues that bring together the Dalai Lama and other Buddhist scholars with Western scientists and philosophers. Mind and Life VIII, on which this book is based, took place in Dharamsala, India, in March 2000.

"Synopsis" by , *Why do seemingly rational, intelligent people commit acts of cruelty and violence?

*What are the root causes of destructive behavior?

*How can we control the emotions that drive these impulses?

*Can we learn to live at peace with ourselves and others?

Imagine sitting with the Dalai Lama in his private meeting room with a small group of world-class scientists and philosophers. The talk is lively and fascinating as these leading minds grapple with age-old questions of compelling contemporary urgency. Daniel Goleman, the internationally bestselling author of Emotional Intelligence, provides the illuminating commentary—and reports on the breakthrough research this historic gathering inspired.

Destructive Emotions

Buddhist philosophy tells us that all personal unhappiness and interpersonal conflict lie in the “three poisons”: craving, anger, and delusion. It also provides antidotes of astonishing psychological sophistication--which are now being confirmed by modern neuroscience. With new high-tech devices, scientists can peer inside the brain centers that calm the inner storms of rage and fear. They also can demonstrate that awareness-training strategies such as meditation strengthen emotional stability—and greatly enhance our positive moods.

The distinguished panel members report these recent findings and debate an exhilarating range of other topics: What role do destructive emotions play in human evolution? Are they “hardwired” in our bodies? Are they universal, or does culture determine how we feel? How can we nurture the compassion that is also our birthright? We learn how practices that reduce negativity have also been shown to bolster the immune system. Here, too, is an enlightened proposal for a school-based program of social and emotional learning that can help our children increase self-awareness, manage their anger, and become more empathetic.

Throughout, these provocative ideas are brought to life by the play of personalities, by the Dalai Lamas probing questions, and by his surprising sense of humor. Although there are no easy answers, the dialogues, which are part of a series sponsored by the Mind and Life Institute, chart an ultimately hopeful course. They are sure to spark discussion among educators, religious and political leaders, parents—and all people who seek peace for themselves and the world.

The Mind and Life Institute sponsors cross-cultural dialogues that bring together the Dalai Lama and other Buddhist scholars with Western scientists and philosophers. Mind and Life VIII, on which this book is based, took place in Dharamsala, India, in March 2000.

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