Murakami Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Q&A | August 19, 2014

Richard Kadrey: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Richard Kadrey



Describe your latest book. The Getaway God is the sixth book in the Sandman Slim series. In it, the very unholy nephilim, James Stark, aka Sandman... Continue »
  1. $17.49 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$10.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Hawthorne Film and Television- History and Criticism

Pauline Kael: A Life in the Dark

by

Pauline Kael: A Life in the Dark Cover

ISBN13: 9780670023127
ISBN10: 0670023124
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $10.95!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Selected by The New York Times Book Review as a Notable Book of the Year

The first biography of The New Yorker's influential, powerful, and controversial film critic.

A decade after her death, Pauline Kael remains the most important figure in film criticism today, in part due to her own inimitable style and power within the film community and in part due to the enormous influence she has exerted over an entire subsequent generation of film critics. During her tenure at the New Yorker from 1967 to 1991 she was a tastemaker, a career maker, and a career breaker. Her brash, vernacular writing style often made for an odd fit at the stately New Yorker.

Brian Kellow gives us a richly detailed look at one of the most astonishing bursts of creativity in film history and a rounded portrait of this remarkable (and often relentlessly driven) woman. Pauline Kael is a book that will be welcomed by the same audience that made Mark Harris's Pictures at a Revolution and Peter Biskind's Easy Riders, Raging Bulls bestsellers, and by anyone who is curious about the power of criticism in the arts.

Review:

"Relentlessly outspoken, unafraid of challenging idols and embracing the lowbrow and the overlooked, New Yorker film critic Pauline Kael, who died in 2001, proves a formidable, however natural, subject for Opera News columnist Kellow (Ethel Merman). He handles this difficult, unsympathetic personality with an admirable evenhandedness, considering that Kael cultivated as many detractors as admirers with her honest, gut-provoked reviewing. Born in 19TK to Polish Jewish immigrants who tried their luck running a chicken farm in Petaluma, Calif., before moving to San Francisco, Pauline was a crack student, deep reader, and eventual philosophy student at Berkeley, her early critical skills honed in the fledgling Berkeley Renaissance of the 1940s, with critics R.P. Blackmur and James Agee as early influences. From a stint as codirector of the Berkeley Cinema Guild with her then husband, Edward Landberg, Kael segued naturally into radio (KPFA) and freelance journalism, championing the New Wave and attacking the fashionable 'auteur theory.' Her first book, I Lost It at the Movies (1965), established her reputation as the 'saltiest' reviewer around, leading to her opening salvo at the New Yorker with an enthusiastic review of Bonnie and Clyde (1968). The old guard, like editor William Shawn, never warmed to her, but the young and iconoclastic loved her. In his fluent, immensely readable study, Kellow fairly represents Kael's tendency to hyperbole (writing of Barbra Streisand or Last Tango in Paris) as well as hurtful ad hominem (George Cukor's Rich and Famous; Shoah)." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

The first major biography of the most influential, powerful, and controversial film critic of the twentieth century

Pauline Kael was, in the words of Entertainment Weekly's movie reviewer Owen Gleiberman, "the Elvis or Beatles of film criticism." During her tenure at The New Yorker from 1968 to 1991, she was the most widely read and, often enough, the most provocative critic in America. In this first full-length biography of the legend who changed the face of film criticism, acclaimed author Brian Kellow gives readers a richly detailed view of Kael's remarkable life—from her youth in rural California to her early struggles to establish her writing career to her peak years at The New Yorker.

About the Author

Brian Kellow is the features editor of Opera News, where his column, “On the Beat,” appears monthly. He is the author of The Bennetts: An Acting Family and the coauthor of Can’t Help Singing: The Life of Eileen Farrell. A classically trained pianist, Kellow has also written for Opera and Playbill, among others. He lives in New York City.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Norman Wilson, February 29, 2012 (view all comments by Norman Wilson)
Brian Kellow has done it again. Here he treats us to yet another epic recounting of a fascinating life in the entertainment industry. Pauline Kael was a new and exciting voice in film criticism. Her hard-as-nails style and eye for talent made her a favorite among movie fans. She was certainly not a favorite of other critics with her contrary opinions and blatant dismissals of reviews with which she did not agree. But she had a style all her own and despised critics who talked down to their readers. She wrote passionately about young new directors and provided another voice for people who didn't agree with "high-brow" critics. She was also instrumental in introducing smaller films and foreign films to an audience that otherwise might have kept their distance.
She was a tough cookie and often made waves in the industry. She made as many enemies as she did friends; but through her long career-the first half of which she spent struggling as a single parent-she made incredible impressions as a writer, a critic and a film aficionado.
Kellow's writing is captivating and easy to read, and it is inspiring to read a story about a woman who struggled for years but refused to give in to the system, insisted on being heard and eventually made a successful career and left a lasting impression on the industry she loved.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780670023127
Subtitle:
A Life in the Dark
Author:
Kellow, Brian
Publisher:
Viking Adult
Subject:
Entertainment & Performing Arts
Subject:
Biography - General
Subject:
Biography-Entertainment and Performing Arts
Subject:
Film and Television-History and Criticism
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
20111027
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
8 pp b/w photos on insert stock
Pages:
432
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 in 1 lb
Age Level:
from 18

Other books you might like

  1. This Is Us: The New All-American Family Used Trade Paper $6.95
  2. Top Secret America: The Rise of the...
    Sale Hardcover $7.98
  3. The Best Spiritual Writing 2011... Sale Trade Paper $4.98
  4. An Invisible Thread: The True Story... Used Trade Paper $7.95
  5. The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and...
    Used Trade Paper $9.95
  6. Healing the Heart of Democracy: The... Used Hardcover $13.00

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » Critics
Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » History and Criticism
Biography » Entertainment and Performing Arts
Biography » General
Biography » Women
Featured Titles » Biography

Pauline Kael: A Life in the Dark Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.95 In Stock
Product details 432 pages Viking Books - English 9780670023127 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Relentlessly outspoken, unafraid of challenging idols and embracing the lowbrow and the overlooked, New Yorker film critic Pauline Kael, who died in 2001, proves a formidable, however natural, subject for Opera News columnist Kellow (Ethel Merman). He handles this difficult, unsympathetic personality with an admirable evenhandedness, considering that Kael cultivated as many detractors as admirers with her honest, gut-provoked reviewing. Born in 19TK to Polish Jewish immigrants who tried their luck running a chicken farm in Petaluma, Calif., before moving to San Francisco, Pauline was a crack student, deep reader, and eventual philosophy student at Berkeley, her early critical skills honed in the fledgling Berkeley Renaissance of the 1940s, with critics R.P. Blackmur and James Agee as early influences. From a stint as codirector of the Berkeley Cinema Guild with her then husband, Edward Landberg, Kael segued naturally into radio (KPFA) and freelance journalism, championing the New Wave and attacking the fashionable 'auteur theory.' Her first book, I Lost It at the Movies (1965), established her reputation as the 'saltiest' reviewer around, leading to her opening salvo at the New Yorker with an enthusiastic review of Bonnie and Clyde (1968). The old guard, like editor William Shawn, never warmed to her, but the young and iconoclastic loved her. In his fluent, immensely readable study, Kellow fairly represents Kael's tendency to hyperbole (writing of Barbra Streisand or Last Tango in Paris) as well as hurtful ad hominem (George Cukor's Rich and Famous; Shoah)." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,

The first major biography of the most influential, powerful, and controversial film critic of the twentieth century

Pauline Kael was, in the words of Entertainment Weekly's movie reviewer Owen Gleiberman, "the Elvis or Beatles of film criticism." During her tenure at The New Yorker from 1968 to 1991, she was the most widely read and, often enough, the most provocative critic in America. In this first full-length biography of the legend who changed the face of film criticism, acclaimed author Brian Kellow gives readers a richly detailed view of Kael's remarkable life—from her youth in rural California to her early struggles to establish her writing career to her peak years at The New Yorker.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.