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Do You Remember Me?: A Father, a Daughter, and a Search for the Self

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Do You Remember Me?: A Father, a Daughter, and a Search for the Self Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In her award-winning andlt;Iandgt;Harmful to Minorsandlt;/Iandgt;, Judith Levine radically disturbed our fixed ideas about childhood. Now, the poignantly personal andlt;Iandgt;Do You Remember Me?andlt;/Iandgt; tackles the other end of life. The book is both the memoir of a daughter coming to terms with a difficult father who is sinking into dementia and an insightful exploration of the ways we think about disability, aging, and the self as it resides in the body and the world. andlt;BRandgt; In prose that is unsentimental yet moving, serious yet darkly funny, complex in emotion and ideas yet spare in diction, Levine reassembles her father's personal and professional history even as he is losing track of it. She unpeels the layers of his complicated personality and uncovers information that surprises even her mother, to whom her father has been married for more than sixty years. andlt;BRandgt; As her father deteriorates, the family consensus about who he was and is and how best to care for him constantly threatens to collapse. Levine recounts the painful discussions, mad outbursts, and gingerly negotiations, and dissects the shifting alliances among family, friends, and a changing guard of hired caretakers. Spending more and more time with her father, she confronts a relationship that has long felt bereft of love. By caring for his needs, she learns to care about and, slowly, to love him. andlt;BRandgt; While Levine chronicles these developments, she looks outside her family for the sources of their perceptions and expectations, deftly weaving politics, science, history, and philosophy into their personal story. A memoir opens up to become a critique of our culture's attitudes toward the old and demented. A claustrophobic account of Alzheimer's is transformed into a complex lesson about love, duty, and community. andlt;BRandgt; What creates a self and keeps it whole? Levine insists that only the collaboration of others can safeguard her father's self against the riddling of his brain. Embracing interdependence and vulnerability, not autonomy and productivity, as the seminal elements of our humanity, Levine challenges herself and her readers to find new meaning, even hope, in one man's mortality and our own.

Review:

"Unsentimental and unsparing, this work studies in unnerving detail what happens when the mind begins to separate from the body and how our society has no model for coping with such fragmentation." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"[A] maddening, very human dance, and Levine gets it down just right. Roiling, confrontational family portrait." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"[A] sensitive, insightful memoir." Library Journal

Book News Annotation:

In this memoir, Levine chronicles her family's struggles to care for her father after he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Through telling this story, she explores the cultural, historical, and political meanings of dementia and aging in a "hypercognitive" society that values self-reliance. The medicalization of the normal aging process is also addressed. Levine is a freelance writer who specializes in issues of sex, race, and cultural politics.
Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Unsentimental yet moving, dead serious yet darkly funny--this incisively written memoir recounts Levine's struggle to care for her aging father while offering an unflinching critique of our culture's attitude toward the old and disabled.

About the Author

Over the past twenty-five years, Judith Levine has written about the ways in which culture, politics, and history are enacted in people's intimate lives. Her articles and essays have appeared in dozens of national publications, including Harper's, The New York Times, and salon.com. Her other books include My Enemy, My Love: Women, Masculinity, and the Dilemmas of Gender and Harmful to Minors: The Perils of Protecting Children from Sex, which was awarded the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in 2002. Levine lives in Brooklyn, New York, and Hardwick, Vermont

Table of Contents

Contents

Prelude

1. Anger

2. Mind

3. Acquaintance

4. Quarantine

5. Care

6. Body

7. Dis/loyalty

8. Decompensation

9. Decisions

10. Family

11. Himself

Reading List

Acknowledgments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780743222303
Author:
Levine, Judith
Publisher:
Free Press
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Self
Subject:
Fathers and daughters
Subject:
Alzheimer's disease
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
General Biography
Subject:
Family
Subject:
Biography - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardback
Series Volume:
13
Publication Date:
20040531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
notes; bibliography
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
8.44 x 5.5 in 14.28 oz

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Biography » Women
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Alzheimers

Do You Remember Me?: A Father, a Daughter, and a Search for the Self Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$11.95 In Stock
Product details 320 pages Free Press - English 9780743222303 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Unsentimental and unsparing, this work studies in unnerving detail what happens when the mind begins to separate from the body and how our society has no model for coping with such fragmentation."
"Review" by , "[A] maddening, very human dance, and Levine gets it down just right. Roiling, confrontational family portrait."
"Review" by , "[A] sensitive, insightful memoir."
"Synopsis" by , Unsentimental yet moving, dead serious yet darkly funny--this incisively written memoir recounts Levine's struggle to care for her aging father while offering an unflinching critique of our culture's attitude toward the old and disabled.
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