Poetry Madness
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Interviews | March 17, 2014

Shawn Donley: IMG Peter Stark: The Powells.com Interview



Peter StarkIt's hard to believe that 200 years ago, the Pacific Northwest was one of the most remote and isolated regions in the world. In 1810, four years... Continue »
  1. $19.59 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$7.95
List price: $15.00
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Hawthorne Military- Vietnam War

What It Is Like to Go to War

by

What It Is Like to Go to War Cover

ISBN13: 9780802145925
ISBN10: 0802145922
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $7.95!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Fast off the success of his devastating Vietnam War novel, Karl Marlantes gives us his incredibly readable treatise on soldier psychology, Reflections on Combat: Psyche, Soul, and Consciousness in Modern Warfare. Writing in a personal address to youths considering military service, soldiers facing imminent combat, government policy-makes, and anyone with an interest in reforming the nature of war or better understanding a society that fosters it, Marlantes approaches this difficult and divisive subject with a raw practicality and honesty informed by his years of sober thought and personal struggle. He is unwilling to take the moral high ground and adopt an idealistic pacifism, and instead addresses a future that will inevitably harbor further wars and create untold further generations of soldiers; with his personal discoveries and wealth of historical and psychological thought, Marlantes explores ways of reforming soldier training, counseling for soldiers and veterans, and military law that will help avoid the unnecessary spiritual and literal casualties of wars past.

The book is divided into many chapters covering such topics as “Atrocities,” “Numbness and the Rapture of Violent Transcendence,” and “Heroism.” Each chapter begins with the effective thesis for the section—a frank statement of a serious problem like the fusing of civilian life and war or the lack of empathy in soldiers — and a broad-scale way to approach its rectification. What follows is then a hybrid of essay and memoir that leads the reader to both a personal and technical (as much as this can apply to matters of human consciousness) understanding of the chapters thesis. Marlantes recounts engaging, gritty, tense, and unflinchingly truthful personal experiences from his deployment in Vietnam: how his laziness in checking a mortar stand resulted in three friendly casualties, how killing Viet Cong and commanding massive firepower imbued him with a sense of omnipotence, how he put an entire rescue helicopter at risk in order to make his scheduled rest and relaxation, how he executed, going beyond the ordered objective, a merciless rout of enemy soldiers as a form of revenge for a fallen comrade. These incredible stories are then supplemented with personal introspection and rigorous philosophical and sociological examination — with frequent appeal to the likes of Jung, Nietzsche, and Yeats — in order to discover the structure of the underlying problem in military training, military operating procedure, and even cultural norms.

All of this goes towards understanding problems in soldier psychology that are complex and terrifying. Marlantes is obsessed with how hopelessly unprepared soldiers are for the transcendental experiences of war — and he doesnt shy away from this construal of the transcendental. While fully affirming the horror of war and death, Marlantes fearlessly asserts that these experiences nonetheless force soldiers into all-too-real contact with that notoriously indescribable quality of humanhood: the unknowable, the intangible, the dark mystery of existence. One of the overarching themes of his book is that military culture discourages soldiers from confronting these sorts of psycho-spiritual conflicts, when in fact the proper course of action is to do the exact opposite — confront these tough issues and experiences head on, before, during, and after combat.

While the book cruises comfortably in the dual tones of the memoirist and the psychoanalyst, it is perhaps most potent when it dips into the truly confessional. At points Marlantes steps back and addresses the problems he had writing this very book — his battles to confront self-deceit, personal trauma, and deep seeded denial — and we see the author laid bare: a brutally honest, sometimes distraught figure hunched over the keyboard, writing with almost sacrificial sincerity. The result is one mans attempt to help future generations in the inevitable event of war, where human beings are forced to witness and carry out the obliteration of life.

Review:

"Marlantes, author of the highly acclaimed novel Matterhorn, reflects in this wrenchingly honest memoir on his time in Vietnam: what it means to go into the combat zone and kill and, most importantly, what it means to truly come home. After graduating from Yale, Marlantes attended Oxford as a Rhodes scholar. But not wanting to hide behind privilege while others fought in his place, he left Oxford in 1967 to ship out to Vietnam as a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps. He eschews straight chronology for a blend of in-country reporting and the paradoxical sense of both fear and exhilaration a soldier feels during war. Most importantly, Marlantes underscores the need for returning veterans to be counseled properly; an 18-year-old cannot 'kill someone and contain it in a healthy way.' Digging as deeply into his own life as he does into the larger sociological and moral issues, Marlantes presents a riveting, powerfully written account of how, after being taught to kill, he learned to deal with the aftermath. Citing a Navajo tale of two warriors who returned home to find their people feared them until they learned to sing about their experience, Marlantes learns the lesson, concluding, 'This book is my song,' (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

From the author of the New York Times Bestseller Matterhorn, this is a powerful nonfiction book about the experience of combat and how inadequately we prepare our young men and women for war.

War is as old as humankind, but in the past, warriors were prepared for battle by ritual, religion and literature — which also helped bring them home. In a compelling narrative, Marlantes weaves riveting accounts of his combat experiences with thoughtful analysis, self-examination and his readings — from Homer to the Mahabharata to Jung. He talks frankly about how he is haunted by the face of the young North Vietnamese soldier he killed at close quarters and how he finally finds a way to make peace with his past. Marlantes discusses the daily contradictions that warriors face in the grind of war, where each battle requires them to take life or spare life, and where they enter a state he likens to the fervor of religious ecstasy.

Just as Matterhorn is already being acclaimed as a classic of war literature, What It Is Like To Go To War is set to become required reading for anyone — soldier or civilian — interested in this visceral and all too essential part of the human experience.

Synopsis:

#3 on Amazon.coms 10 Best Books of 2011

The New Yorker Favorite Books from 2011

Hudson Booksellers Best Books of 2011

Barnes and Noble Best Nonfiction Books of 2011

St. Louis Post Dispatch Favorite Books of 2011

A Shelf Awareness Reviewers Top Pick of 2011

One of the most important and highly-praised books of 2011, Karl Marlantes's What It Is Like to Go to War is set to become just as much of a classic as his epic novel Matterhorn.

In What It Is Like to Go to War, Marlantes takes a deeply personal and candid look at the experience and ordeal of combat, critically examining how we might better prepare our young soldiers for war. War is as old as humankind, but in the past, warriors were prepared for battle by ritual, religion, and literature — which also helped bring them home. In a compelling narrative, Marlantes weaves riveting accounts of his combat experiences with thoughtful analysis, self-examination, and his readings — from Homer to the Mahabharata to Jung. He makes it clear just how poorly prepared our nineteen-year-old warriors — mainly men but increasingly women — are for the psychological and spiritual aspects of their journey.

About the Author

A graduate of Yale University and a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University, Karl Marlantes served as a Marine in Vietnam, where he was awarded the Navy Cross, the Bronze Star, two Navy Commendation medals for valor, two Purple Hearts, and ten air medals. He is the author of the best-selling and prize-winning Matterhorn.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

Walter Bilderback, January 1, 2013 (view all comments by Walter Bilderback)
A book everyone should read.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Mentalfloss1, October 20, 2012 (view all comments by Mentalfloss1)
I'm not the first to say that I think that this book, as well as Marlantes' first book, "Matterhorn", should be required reading for all who wish to become warriors. As Marlantes himself says, this is not to discourage people from joining the military but it's to provide a broader and deeper view of what they are agreeing to do. Further, this knowledge may well ameliorate the effects of PTSD on those who experience combat, or at least might provide a framework for a reduction of symptoms.

This is not some dry discourse built of trite psychology and stuffy philosophy, though both of those disciplines are woven through the trains of thought presented. There are many real life examples of wartime incidents and situations that Marlantes paints very well for us. Though "Matterhorn" (which is a fictionalization of his time in Vietnam) is perhaps more compelling as a story of war, "What It Is Like to Go to War" is deeper and more thought provoking. My take is that the first 95% of the book was very well done and greatly informative while the last 5% was murky, at least to me. This may well be that I can't make myself completely grasp what he's saying in that last portion. In fact, that's likely.

Marlantes is a Rhodes scholar from the Pacific Northwest. He's a dead honest writer, revealing his innermost self with great courage. I admire him and his family for this. If you, or someone you know and care for, is planning on a life in the military you might consider giving them both of these books. This is not to discourage them, Marlantes seems to cherish his time at war, but to simply inform them of some of the realities of being a warrior.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
View all 2 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780802145925
Author:
Marlantes, Karl
Publisher:
Grove Press
Subject:
Military - Strategy
Subject:
Biography-Military
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20120931
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in

Other books you might like

  1. No Easy Day: The Firsthand Account...
    Used Hardcover $9.95
  2. In Between Days Used Hardcover $9.95
  3. Sea Change Used Trade Paper $8.95
  4. The Ridge Used Trade Paper $7.50
  5. The Next Best Thing
    Used Hardcover $5.95
  6. Berlin Noir (Penguin Crime/Mystery)
    Used Trade Paper $11.95

Related Subjects

Biography » General
Biography » Military
Featured Titles » Bestsellers
Featured Titles » General
Featured Titles » History and Social Science
History and Social Science » Military » General
History and Social Science » Military » Strategy Tactics and Deception
History and Social Science » Military » Vietnam War

What It Is Like to Go to War Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Grove Press - English 9780802145925 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Marlantes, author of the highly acclaimed novel Matterhorn, reflects in this wrenchingly honest memoir on his time in Vietnam: what it means to go into the combat zone and kill and, most importantly, what it means to truly come home. After graduating from Yale, Marlantes attended Oxford as a Rhodes scholar. But not wanting to hide behind privilege while others fought in his place, he left Oxford in 1967 to ship out to Vietnam as a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps. He eschews straight chronology for a blend of in-country reporting and the paradoxical sense of both fear and exhilaration a soldier feels during war. Most importantly, Marlantes underscores the need for returning veterans to be counseled properly; an 18-year-old cannot 'kill someone and contain it in a healthy way.' Digging as deeply into his own life as he does into the larger sociological and moral issues, Marlantes presents a riveting, powerfully written account of how, after being taught to kill, he learned to deal with the aftermath. Citing a Navajo tale of two warriors who returned home to find their people feared them until they learned to sing about their experience, Marlantes learns the lesson, concluding, 'This book is my song,' (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , From the author of the New York Times Bestseller Matterhorn, this is a powerful nonfiction book about the experience of combat and how inadequately we prepare our young men and women for war.

War is as old as humankind, but in the past, warriors were prepared for battle by ritual, religion and literature — which also helped bring them home. In a compelling narrative, Marlantes weaves riveting accounts of his combat experiences with thoughtful analysis, self-examination and his readings — from Homer to the Mahabharata to Jung. He talks frankly about how he is haunted by the face of the young North Vietnamese soldier he killed at close quarters and how he finally finds a way to make peace with his past. Marlantes discusses the daily contradictions that warriors face in the grind of war, where each battle requires them to take life or spare life, and where they enter a state he likens to the fervor of religious ecstasy.

Just as Matterhorn is already being acclaimed as a classic of war literature, What It Is Like To Go To War is set to become required reading for anyone — soldier or civilian — interested in this visceral and all too essential part of the human experience.

"Synopsis" by , #3 on Amazon.coms 10 Best Books of 2011

The New Yorker Favorite Books from 2011

Hudson Booksellers Best Books of 2011

Barnes and Noble Best Nonfiction Books of 2011

St. Louis Post Dispatch Favorite Books of 2011

A Shelf Awareness Reviewers Top Pick of 2011

One of the most important and highly-praised books of 2011, Karl Marlantes's What It Is Like to Go to War is set to become just as much of a classic as his epic novel Matterhorn.

In What It Is Like to Go to War, Marlantes takes a deeply personal and candid look at the experience and ordeal of combat, critically examining how we might better prepare our young soldiers for war. War is as old as humankind, but in the past, warriors were prepared for battle by ritual, religion, and literature — which also helped bring them home. In a compelling narrative, Marlantes weaves riveting accounts of his combat experiences with thoughtful analysis, self-examination, and his readings — from Homer to the Mahabharata to Jung. He makes it clear just how poorly prepared our nineteen-year-old warriors — mainly men but increasingly women — are for the psychological and spiritual aspects of their journey.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.