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Mission to Paris

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Mission to Paris Cover

ISBN13: 9780812981827
ISBN10: 0812981820
Condition: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Late summer, 1938. Hollywood film star Fredric Stahl is on his way to Paris to make a movie. The Nazis know he’s coming — a secret bureau within the Reich has been waging political warfare against France, and for their purposes, Fredric Stahl is a perfect agent of influence. What they don’t know is that Stahl, horrified by the Nazi war on Jews and intellectuals, has become part of an informal spy service run out of the American embassy. Mission to Paris is filled with heart-stopping tension, beautifully drawn scenes of romance, and extraordinarily alive characters: foreign assassins; a glamorous Russian actress-turned-spy; and the women in Stahl’s life. At the center of the novel is the city of Paris — its bistros, hotels grand and anonymous, and the Parisians, living every night as though it were their last. Alan Furst brings to life both a dark time in history and the passion of the human hearts that fought to survive it.

Review:

“This is the romantic Paris to make a tourist weep….The brilliant historical flourishes seem to create — or recreate — a world….In Furst’s densely populated books, hundred of minor characters — clerks, chauffeurs, soldiers, whores — all whirl around his heroes in perfect focus for a page or two, then dot by dot, face by face, they vanish, leaving a heartbreaking sense of the vast Homeric epic that was World War II and the smallness of almost every life that was caught up in it.” The New York Times Book Review

Review:

“ Alan Furst again shows why he is a grandmaster of the historical espionage genre. Furst not only vividly re-creates the excitement and growing gloom of the City of Light in 1938-39, as war with Nazi Germany looms, but also demonstrates a profound knowledge of the political divisions and cultural sensibilities of that bygone era….As summer or subway reading goes, it doesn't get more action-packed and grippingly atmospheric than this.” The Boston Globe

Review:

“Between them, Fredric and Paris make this a book no reader will put down to the final page. Furst evokes the city and the prewar anxiety with exquisite tension that is only a bit relieved by Fredric’s encounters with several women, each a vivid and attractive character. Critics compare Furst to Graham Greene and John le Carré, but the time has come for this much-published author (this is his ninth World War II novel after Spies of the Balkans) to occupy his own pinnacle as a master of historical espionage.” Library Journal (starred)

Review:

“Furst conveys a strong sense of the era, when responding to a knock might open the door to the end of one’s days. The novel recalls a time when black and white applied to both movies and moral choices. It’s a tale with wide appeal.” Kirkus (starred)

Review:

“[Furst] is most at home in Paris, which is why legions of his fans, upon seeing only the title of his latest book, will immediately feel pulses quicken….Furst has been doing this and doing it superbly for a long time now….Long ago Furst made the jump from genre favorite to mainstream bestsellerdom; returning to his signature setting, Paris, he only stands to climb higher.” Booklist (starred)

Review:

“Alan Furst’s writing reminds me of a swim in perfect water on a perfect day, fluid and exquisite. One wants the feeling to go on forever, the book to never end….Like Graham Greene, Furst creates believable characters caught up, with varying degrees of willingness, in the parade of political life. And because they care, the reader does, too….Furst is one of the finest spy novelists working today, and, from boudoir to the beach, Mission to Paris is perfect summer reading.” Publishers Weekly

Review:

“Reading Mission to Paris is like sipping a fine Chateau Margaux: Sublime!” Erik Larson

About the Author

Alan Furst> is widely recognized as the master of the historical spy novel. Now translated into eighteen languages, he is the author of Night Soldiers, Dark Star, The Polish Officer, The World at Night, Red Gold, Kingdom of Shadows, Blood of Victory, Dark Voyage, The Foreign Correspondent, The Spies of Warsaw, and Spies of the Balkans. Born in New York, he lived for many years in Paris, and now lives on Long Island.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

Ronrose, February 13, 2014 (view all comments by Ronrose)
Why, in late 1938, when tens of thousands of people are fleeing from Europe, is Frederic Stahl headed to Paris? For a film star like Stahl, working for Warner Brothers Studios, all it that matters is that Jack Warner wants him in France for a movie. What Jack Warner wants, Jack Warner gets. In the face of threats and bullying from Germany's Hitler, France and all of Europe is in turmoil. Many Parisians think it would be better to just give in and unify under Germany rather than fight another devastating war. Others would rather fight to the death than submit to the atrocities they already see spreading under Hitler's regime. Corruption and outside influence are quickly dividing an already shaky French government. Stahl, born in Austria and educated in Europe before finding his new name in American films, has always had a love for Paris. He looks forward to returning, but while the streets and sites are the same, the people and the political atmosphere have changed. Stahl is quickly swooped up by the provocateurs infesting Paris. He is pressured by German aristocrats and diplomats living in Paris, who see him as a possible sympathizer or perhaps a pawn to be used in this most dangerous game. The French also put pressure on him to join on one side or the other of the chasm dividing Paris. Stahl has to do his best to complete his movie while trying to decide whether to stay neutral like his new homeland America, or take sides, as his once beloved Paris changes around him. This flows like a well made early 1940's espionage film. You can just see picture it on a screen in black and white with a cast of international stars from one of the major film studio's list of contract players. It would be great to film it as an homage to the magnificent movies Hollywood used to make. Book provided for review by Random House Publishing.
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Edward Hahn, June 13, 2013 (view all comments by Edward Hahn)
Alan Furst is one of my favorite authors. He is head and shoulders above anyone writing spy novels today possibly excepting John Le Carre'. As I've said in previous reviews, he has taken the spy novel to the level of contemporary literature. This effort is no exception.

The protagonist, Hollywood film star Fredric Stahl, born in Vienna but now a permanent resident of the U.S. is sent to Paris in late 1938 to make a movie for Paramount Studios on loan from Warner Bros. Upon arriving in Paris he is immediately contacted by a number of People who are part of an effort by a bureau of the Reich Foreign Office dedicated to degrading France's will to fight.

The Germans and their sympathizers see Stahl as an excellent agent of influence. They don't realize he is horrified by what Germany has become and decides to become part of an informal spy service being run out of the American embassy in Paris.

Furst has great skill in developing characters. Whether major or minor, good or evil, they are believable and human. From corrupt newspaper reporters to the rich and famous to assassins and spies as well as the cast and company of the movie, "Apres Le Guerre", all play their parts seamlessly and add to the incredible realism Furst elicits.

Paris is, in some ways, one of the major characters. Stahl had lived there earlier as a penniless actor and he has never forgotten the magic of the city. As the story unfolds the reader is transported back in time to a pre-war Paris populated by mostly frightened individuals hoping for the best.

Whenever I read a Furst novel, I am transported to a different time and place. I am in awe of his ability to reconstruct the context of the times and bring me into the story in a way few authors are capable of doing.

I highly recommend this book, especially to those who have never had the pleasure of experiencing Furst's talent. If you do try this story, I'm confident it won't be your last Furst Novel.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780812981827
Author:
Furst, Alan
Publisher:
Random House Trade
Subject:
Thrillers
Subject:
Popular Fiction-Technothrillers
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20130631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
7.9 x 5.1 x 0.59 in 0.4563 lb

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Mission to Paris Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.95 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Random House Trade - English 9780812981827 Reviews:
"Review" by , “This is the romantic Paris to make a tourist weep….The brilliant historical flourishes seem to create — or recreate — a world….In Furst’s densely populated books, hundred of minor characters — clerks, chauffeurs, soldiers, whores — all whirl around his heroes in perfect focus for a page or two, then dot by dot, face by face, they vanish, leaving a heartbreaking sense of the vast Homeric epic that was World War II and the smallness of almost every life that was caught up in it.”
"Review" by , “ Alan Furst again shows why he is a grandmaster of the historical espionage genre. Furst not only vividly re-creates the excitement and growing gloom of the City of Light in 1938-39, as war with Nazi Germany looms, but also demonstrates a profound knowledge of the political divisions and cultural sensibilities of that bygone era….As summer or subway reading goes, it doesn't get more action-packed and grippingly atmospheric than this.”
"Review" by , “Between them, Fredric and Paris make this a book no reader will put down to the final page. Furst evokes the city and the prewar anxiety with exquisite tension that is only a bit relieved by Fredric’s encounters with several women, each a vivid and attractive character. Critics compare Furst to Graham Greene and John le Carré, but the time has come for this much-published author (this is his ninth World War II novel after Spies of the Balkans) to occupy his own pinnacle as a master of historical espionage.”
"Review" by , “Furst conveys a strong sense of the era, when responding to a knock might open the door to the end of one’s days. The novel recalls a time when black and white applied to both movies and moral choices. It’s a tale with wide appeal.”
"Review" by , “[Furst] is most at home in Paris, which is why legions of his fans, upon seeing only the title of his latest book, will immediately feel pulses quicken….Furst has been doing this and doing it superbly for a long time now….Long ago Furst made the jump from genre favorite to mainstream bestsellerdom; returning to his signature setting, Paris, he only stands to climb higher.”
"Review" by , “Alan Furst’s writing reminds me of a swim in perfect water on a perfect day, fluid and exquisite. One wants the feeling to go on forever, the book to never end….Like Graham Greene, Furst creates believable characters caught up, with varying degrees of willingness, in the parade of political life. And because they care, the reader does, too….Furst is one of the finest spy novelists working today, and, from boudoir to the beach, Mission to Paris is perfect summer reading.”
"Review" by , “Reading Mission to Paris is like sipping a fine Chateau Margaux: Sublime!”
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