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1 Hawthorne LIT- CRIT & REF

This title in other editions

Loaded Words

by

Loaded Words Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Two Greek cities which in their time were leading states in the Mediterranean world, Selinus in Sicily and Cyrene in Libya, set up inscriptions of the kind called sacred laws, but regulating worship on a larger scale than elsewhere - Selinus in the mid fifth century B.C., Cyrene in the late fourth. In different ways, the content and the format of both inscriptions are so unusual that they have baffled understanding.

At Selinus, a large lead tablet with two columns of writing upside down to each other is thought to be a remedy for homicide pollution arising from civil strife, but most of it remains obscure and intractable. The gods who are named and the ritual that is prescribed have been misinterpreted in the light of literary works that dwell on the sensational. Instead, they belong to agrarian religion and follow a regular sequence of devotions, the upside-down columns being reversed midway through the year with magical effect. Gods and ritual were selected because of their appeal to ordinary persons. Selinus was governed by a long enduring oligarchy which made an effort, appearing also in the economic details of sacrifice, to reconcile rich and poor.

At Cyrene, a long series of rules were displayed on a marble block in the premier shrine of Apollo. They are extremely diverse - both costly and trivial, customary and novel - and eighty years of disputation have brought no agreement as to the individual meaning or general significance. In fact this mixture of things is carefully arranged to suit a variety of needs, of rich and poor, of citizens of long standing and of new-comers probably of Libyan origin. In one instance the same agrarian deities appear as at Selinus. It is the work once more of a moderate oligarchy, which on other evidence proved its worth during the turbulent events of this period.

Religion and Reconciliation in Greek Cities provides a revised text and a secure meaning for both documents, and interprets the gods, the ritual, and the social background in the light of much comparative material from other Greek cities. Noel Robertson's approach rejects the usual assumptions based on moralizing literary works and in doing so restores to us an ancient nature religion which Greek communities adapted to their own practical purposes.

Review:

"Self-styled 'peripatetic writer,' Harvard Shakespearean, and culture critic Garber (The Use and Abuse of Literature) collects loosely connected but fascinating essays (about half of them previously published in journals and books) on a range of themes. No word is more loaded than 'madness,' which she considers in its '50s and '60s expression and incarnation in Mad magazine and Mad Libs. She considers the significance of reading 'in slow motion,' focusing on the words rather than on external contexts, and the cultural implications of Shakespeare astride the literary canon. She uses the occasion of Patti Smith winning a National Book Award (Garber was on the panel that selected her book Just Kids) to meditate on celebrity lives as mythologies (like celebrities, 'whatever did, they were always good copy'). And finally, she pleads for reinvigorating the humanities, which she sees as plagued by low self-esteem, through the fostering of collaboration, a new literary commitment, and a reduction of hyperspecialization and overinsulation within English departments. Scholarship cross-fertilized by a new engagement with the political world remains Garber's vision. (June)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Throughout the world, governments are restructuring social and welfare provision to give a stronger role to opportunity, aspiration and individual responsibility, and to competition, markets, and consumer choice. This approach centers on a logic of individual rational action: people are the best judges of what serves their own interests and government should give them as much freedom of choice as possible. The UK has gone further than any other major European country in reform and provides a useful object lesson.

Reframing Social Citizenship analyzes the pressures on social citizenship from changes in work and the family, political actors, population aging, and the processes within government in the relentless international process of globalization that have shaped the response. It examines the various social science approaches to agency and argues that the logic of rational action is able to explain how reciprocity arises and is sustained but offers a weak foundation for social inclusion and social trust. It will only sustain part of the welfare state. A detailed assessment of empirical evidence shows how the outcomes of the new policy framework correspond to its theoretical strengths and limitations. Reforms have achieved considerable success in delivering mass services efficiently. They are much less successful in redistributing to more vulnerable low income groups and in maintaining public trust in the structure of provision.

The risk is that mistrustful and disquieted voters may be unwilling to support high spending on health care, pensions and other benefits at a time when they are most needed. In short, the reform programme was undertaken for excellent reasons in a difficult international context, but risks throwing the baby out with the bathwater.

Synopsis:

'He's great, Vera,' said Angie.

When Viktor Sarav takes a job at Ballantine's, Angie and her brother Don - the young owners of the New York fashion company - are pleased. But soon there are strange deaths in the company. Is there a vampire at work at Ballantine's? Vera Donato, a company director with secrets to hide, is against Viktor. But Ed Valdemar, the company lawyer, trusts him. Who is right?

About the Author

MARJORIE GARBER is William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of English and of Visual and Environmental Studies at Harvard University. Among her many books are Symptoms of Culture, Quotation Marks, Shakespeare After All, and The Use and Abuse of Literature.

Table of Contents

Introduction: Loaded Questions

Part I

1 Loaded Words

2 Good to Think With

3 Mad Lib

4 Third Person Interruption

5 Our Genius Problem

6 Anatomy of a Honey Trap

7 Dig It: Searching for Fame in All the Wrong Places

Part II

8 Shakespeare in Slow Motion

9 Character Flaws

10 The Marvel of Peru

11 Translating F.O. Matthiessen

12 The Shakespeare Brand

Part III

13 After the Humanities

14 The Gypsy Scholar and the Scholar Gypsy

15 Radical Numbers

16 General Education

Product Details

ISBN:
9780823242054
Author:
Garber, Marjorie
Publisher:
Fordham University Press
Subject:
Literature/English | British Literature | Shakespeare
Subject:
Literary Criticism : General
Subject:
Popular Culture
Publication Date:
20120631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
246
Dimensions:
6 x 8.9 x 0.7 in 0.75 lb

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Linguistics » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
Humanities » Literary Criticism » General
Humanities » Literary Criticism » Literary and Cultural Studies

Loaded Words Sale Trade Paper
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Product details 246 pages Fordham University Press - English 9780823242054 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Self-styled 'peripatetic writer,' Harvard Shakespearean, and culture critic Garber (The Use and Abuse of Literature) collects loosely connected but fascinating essays (about half of them previously published in journals and books) on a range of themes. No word is more loaded than 'madness,' which she considers in its '50s and '60s expression and incarnation in Mad magazine and Mad Libs. She considers the significance of reading 'in slow motion,' focusing on the words rather than on external contexts, and the cultural implications of Shakespeare astride the literary canon. She uses the occasion of Patti Smith winning a National Book Award (Garber was on the panel that selected her book Just Kids) to meditate on celebrity lives as mythologies (like celebrities, 'whatever did, they were always good copy'). And finally, she pleads for reinvigorating the humanities, which she sees as plagued by low self-esteem, through the fostering of collaboration, a new literary commitment, and a reduction of hyperspecialization and overinsulation within English departments. Scholarship cross-fertilized by a new engagement with the political world remains Garber's vision. (June)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , Throughout the world, governments are restructuring social and welfare provision to give a stronger role to opportunity, aspiration and individual responsibility, and to competition, markets, and consumer choice. This approach centers on a logic of individual rational action: people are the best judges of what serves their own interests and government should give them as much freedom of choice as possible. The UK has gone further than any other major European country in reform and provides a useful object lesson.

Reframing Social Citizenship analyzes the pressures on social citizenship from changes in work and the family, political actors, population aging, and the processes within government in the relentless international process of globalization that have shaped the response. It examines the various social science approaches to agency and argues that the logic of rational action is able to explain how reciprocity arises and is sustained but offers a weak foundation for social inclusion and social trust. It will only sustain part of the welfare state. A detailed assessment of empirical evidence shows how the outcomes of the new policy framework correspond to its theoretical strengths and limitations. Reforms have achieved considerable success in delivering mass services efficiently. They are much less successful in redistributing to more vulnerable low income groups and in maintaining public trust in the structure of provision.

The risk is that mistrustful and disquieted voters may be unwilling to support high spending on health care, pensions and other benefits at a time when they are most needed. In short, the reform programme was undertaken for excellent reasons in a difficult international context, but risks throwing the baby out with the bathwater.

"Synopsis" by , 'He's great, Vera,' said Angie.

When Viktor Sarav takes a job at Ballantine's, Angie and her brother Don - the young owners of the New York fashion company - are pleased. But soon there are strange deaths in the company. Is there a vampire at work at Ballantine's? Vera Donato, a company director with secrets to hide, is against Viktor. But Ed Valdemar, the company lawyer, trusts him. Who is right?

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