It's Raining Books Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | September 17, 2014

Merritt Tierce: IMG Has My Husband Read It?



My first novel, Love Me Back, was published on September 16. Writing the book took seven years, and along the way three chapters were published in... Continue »
  1. $16.77 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Love Me Back

    Merritt Tierce 9780385538077

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$8.50
List price: $16.00
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Beaverton Literature- A to Z
1 Burnside Literature- A to Z
3 Hawthorne Literature- A to Z
1 Local Warehouse Literature- A to Z

At Last

by

At Last Cover

ISBN13: 9781250023902
ISBN10: 1250023904
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A New York Times Notable Book of the Year

A Time Magazine Best Book of the Year

An Esquire Best Book of Year

"Beautifully wrought . . . Brutally funny and sad."—Vanity Fair

The fifth novel in Edward St. Aubyn's stunning cycle about his protagonist Patrick Melrose. The last four novels in the cycle are available in The Patrick Melrose Novels.

Here, from the writer described by The Guardian as “our purest living prose stylist” and whom Alan Hollinghurst has called “the most brilliant English novelist of his generation,” is a work of glittering social comedy, profound emotional truth, and acute verbal wit.

As readers of Edward St. Aubyn's extraordinary earlier works—Never Mind, Bad News, Some Hope, and the Man Booker Prize finalist Mother's Milk—are well aware, for Patrick Melrose, “family” has always been a double-edged sword. At Last begins as friends, relatives, and foes trickle in to pay final respects to his mother, Eleanor. An Americam heiress, Eleanor married into the British aristocracy, giving up the grandeur of her upbringing for “good works” freely bestowed on everyone but her own son, who finds himself questioning whether his transition to a life without parents will indeed be the liberation he had so long imagined. 

The service ends, and family and friends gather for a final party. Amid the social niceties and social horrors, Patrick begins to sense the prospect of release from the extremes of his childhood, and at the end of the day, alone in his room, the promise some form of safety. . . at last.

Synopsis:

1935, London: Anthony Powell is honing the edge of his humor on psychoanalysis and the film industry.
Two young London charlatans, an amateur Freudian analyst and an bully with “connections with the film industry”  both get their claws into a young man with a small fortune to spend.  The plot takes them to Paris and Berlin, art galleries and whore-houses. The women are moochers, the art dealers knaves, the wealthy Americans uncultured boobs, the action is lively, and the writing clever. A very funny period piece.

Synopsis:

Unsavory artists, titled boobs, and charlatans with an affinity for Freud—such are the oddballs whose antics animate the early novels of the late British master Anthony Powell. A genius of social satire delivered with a very dry wit, Powell builds his comedies on the foibles of British high society between the wars, delving into subjects as various as psychoanalysis, the film industry, publishing, and (of course) sex. More explorations of relationships and vanity than plot-driven narratives, these slim novels reveal the early stirrings of the unequaled style, ear for dialogue, and eye for irony that would reach their caustic peak in Powells epic A Dance to the Music of Time.

 

In Agents and Patients, we return to London with the newly wealthy, memorably named Blore-Smith: an innocent, decent enough chap . . . and a drip. Vulnerable to the machinations of those with less money and more lust, Blore-Smith falls victim to two con artists whose ploys carry him through to the art galleries and whorehouses of Paris, Berlin, and beyond.

 

Written from a vantage point both high and necessarily narrow, Powells early novels nevertheless deal in the universal themes that would become a substantial part of his oeuvre: pride, greed, and what makes people behave as they do. Filled with eccentric characters and piercing insights, Powells work is achingly hilarious, human, and true.

Synopsis:

A New York Times Notable Book of the Year

A Time Magazine Best Book of the Year

An Esquire Best Book of Year

"Beautifully wrought . . . Brutally funny and sad."—Vanity Fair

Here, from the writer described by The Guardian as “our purest living prose stylist” and whom Alan Hollinghurst has called “the most brilliant English novelist of his generation,” is a work of glittering social comedy, profound emotional truth, and acute verbal wit. At Last is also the stunning culmination of one of the great fiction enterprises of the past two decades in the life of the English novel.

As readers of Edward St. Aubyn's extraordinary earlier works—Never Mind, Bad News, Some Hope, and the Man Booker Prize finalist Mother's Milk—are well aware, for Patrick Melrose, “family” has always been a double-edged sword. At Last begins as friends, relatives, and foes trickle in to pay final respects to his mother, Eleanor. An Americam heiress, Eleanor married into the British aristocracy, giving up the grandeur of her upbringing for “good works” freely bestowed on everyone but her own son, who finds himself questioning whether his transition to a life without parents will indeed be the liberation he had so long imagined. 

The service ends, and family and friends gather for a final party. Amid the social niceties and social horrors, Patrick begins to sense the prospect of release from the extremes of his childhood, and at the end of the day, alone in his room, the promise some form of safety. . . at last.

About the Author

Edward St. Aubyn was born in London in 1960. He is the author of A Clue to the Exit and On the Edge; a series of novels about the Melrose family, including the trilogy Some Hope; and Mothers Milk, which was shortlisted for the 2006 Man Booker Prize.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

lsilvercity, January 30, 2013 (view all comments by lsilvercity)
At Last by Edward St Aubyn is the final installment of five short books that St Aubyn has written. The five books are fiction but are based on the author's own experiences. The principal target of his very acidic and very funny satire are the English upper classes but he manages to skewer French, American, Irish, and British intellectuals and middle class and lower class as well. The stories are quite bleak but is so funny that reading, I continually burst out laughing. At Last does offer some absolution from the painful events recounted in the first four stories.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9781250023902
Author:
St Aubyn, Edward
Publisher:
Picador USA
Author:
Edward St. Aubyn
Author:
Powell, Anthony
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Family life
Subject:
Literature-Family Life
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20121231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in

Other books you might like

  1. The Given Day: A Novel
    Used Hardcover $3.50
  2. The Reef Used Trade Paper $5.95
  3. The Magicians
    New Mass Market $9.22
  4. The Foreign Student Used Trade Paper $3.50
  5. Death of the Heart Used Mass Market $3.50
  6. Alas, Babylon Used Mass Market $3.50

Related Subjects

Featured Titles » Literature
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Family Life
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Sale Books

At Last Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.50 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Picador USA - English 9781250023902 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
1935, London: Anthony Powell is honing the edge of his humor on psychoanalysis and the film industry.
Two young London charlatans, an amateur Freudian analyst and an bully with “connections with the film industry”  both get their claws into a young man with a small fortune to spend.  The plot takes them to Paris and Berlin, art galleries and whore-houses. The women are moochers, the art dealers knaves, the wealthy Americans uncultured boobs, the action is lively, and the writing clever. A very funny period piece.

"Synopsis" by ,
Unsavory artists, titled boobs, and charlatans with an affinity for Freud—such are the oddballs whose antics animate the early novels of the late British master Anthony Powell. A genius of social satire delivered with a very dry wit, Powell builds his comedies on the foibles of British high society between the wars, delving into subjects as various as psychoanalysis, the film industry, publishing, and (of course) sex. More explorations of relationships and vanity than plot-driven narratives, these slim novels reveal the early stirrings of the unequaled style, ear for dialogue, and eye for irony that would reach their caustic peak in Powells epic A Dance to the Music of Time.

 

In Agents and Patients, we return to London with the newly wealthy, memorably named Blore-Smith: an innocent, decent enough chap . . . and a drip. Vulnerable to the machinations of those with less money and more lust, Blore-Smith falls victim to two con artists whose ploys carry him through to the art galleries and whorehouses of Paris, Berlin, and beyond.

 

Written from a vantage point both high and necessarily narrow, Powells early novels nevertheless deal in the universal themes that would become a substantial part of his oeuvre: pride, greed, and what makes people behave as they do. Filled with eccentric characters and piercing insights, Powells work is achingly hilarious, human, and true.

"Synopsis" by ,

A New York Times Notable Book of the Year

A Time Magazine Best Book of the Year

An Esquire Best Book of Year

"Beautifully wrought . . . Brutally funny and sad."—Vanity Fair

Here, from the writer described by The Guardian as “our purest living prose stylist” and whom Alan Hollinghurst has called “the most brilliant English novelist of his generation,” is a work of glittering social comedy, profound emotional truth, and acute verbal wit. At Last is also the stunning culmination of one of the great fiction enterprises of the past two decades in the life of the English novel.

As readers of Edward St. Aubyn's extraordinary earlier works—Never Mind, Bad News, Some Hope, and the Man Booker Prize finalist Mother's Milk—are well aware, for Patrick Melrose, “family” has always been a double-edged sword. At Last begins as friends, relatives, and foes trickle in to pay final respects to his mother, Eleanor. An Americam heiress, Eleanor married into the British aristocracy, giving up the grandeur of her upbringing for “good works” freely bestowed on everyone but her own son, who finds himself questioning whether his transition to a life without parents will indeed be the liberation he had so long imagined. 

The service ends, and family and friends gather for a final party. Amid the social niceties and social horrors, Patrick begins to sense the prospect of release from the extremes of his childhood, and at the end of the day, alone in his room, the promise some form of safety. . . at last.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.