Summer Reading Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | June 20, 2014

Lisa Howorth: IMG So Many Books, So Many Writers



I'm not a bookseller, but I'm married to one, and Square Books is a family. And we all know about families and how hard it is to disassociate... Continue »

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$19.50
List price: $28.00
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Beaverton Military- World War II Pacific
1 Burnside Military- World War II Aviation

Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption

by

Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption Cover

ISBN13: 9781400064168
ISBN10: 1400064163
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 2 left in stock at $19.50!

 

Awards

Puddlys 2012 2012 Puddly Award for Nonfiction

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • SOON TO BE A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE • Hailed as the top nonfiction book of the year by Time magazine • Winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for biography and the Indies Choice Adult Nonfiction Book of the Year award

On a May afternoon in 1943, an Army Air Forces bomber crashed into the Pacific Ocean and disappeared, leaving only a spray of debris and a slick of oil, gasoline, and blood. Then, on the ocean surface, a face appeared. It was that of a young lieutenant, the plane’s bombardier, who was struggling to a life raft and pulling himself aboard. So began one of the most extraordinary odysseys of the Second World War.

The lieutenant’s name was Louis Zamperini. In boyhood, he’d been a cunning and incorrigible delinquent, breaking into houses, brawling, and fleeing his home to ride the rails. As a teenager, he had channeled his defiance into running, discovering a prodigious talent that had carried him to the Berlin Olympics and within sight of the four-minute mile. But when war had come, the athlete had become an airman, embarking on a journey that led to his doomed flight, a tiny raft, and a drift into the unknown.

Ahead of Zamperini lay thousands of miles of open ocean, leaping sharks, a foundering raft, thirst and starvation, enemy aircraft, and, beyond, a trial even greater. Driven to the limits of endurance, Zamperini would answer desperation with ingenuity; suffering with hope, resolve, and humor; brutality with rebellion. His fate, whether triumph or tragedy, would be suspended on the fraying wire of his will.

In her long-awaited new book, Laura Hillenbrand writes with the same rich and vivid narrative voice she displayed in Seabiscuit. Telling an unforgettable story of a man’s journey into extremity, Unbroken is a testament to the resilience of the human mind, body, and spirit.

Praise for Unbroken

 

“Extraordinarily moving . . . a powerfully drawn survival epic.”The Wall Street Journal

 

“[A] one-in-a-billion story . . . designed to wrench from self-respecting critics all the blurby adjectives we normally try to avoid: It is amazing, unforgettable, gripping, harrowing, chilling, and inspiring.”—New York

 

“Staggering . . . mesmerizing . . . Hillenbrand’s writing is so ferociously cinematic, the events she describes so incredible, you don’t dare take your eyes off the page.”People

 

“A meticulous, soaring and beautifully written account of an extraordinary life.”—The Washington Post

 

“Ambitious and powerful . . . a startling narrative and an inspirational book.”—The New York Times Book Review

 

“Marvelous . . . Unbroken is wonderful twice over, for the tale it tells and for the way it’s told. . . . It manages maximum velocity with no loss of subtlety.”Newsweek

 

“Moving and, yes, inspirational . . . [Laura] Hillenbrand’s unforgettable book . . . deserve[s] pride of place alongside the best works of literature that chart the complications and the hard-won triumphs of so-called ordinary Americans and their extraordinary time.”—Maureen Corrigan, Fresh Air

 

“Hillenbrand . . . tells [this] story with cool elegance but at a thrilling sprinter’s pace.”Time

Unbroken is too much book to hope for: a hellride of a story in the grip of the one writer who can handle it.”—Christopher McDougall, author of Born to Run

Review:

"From the 1936 Olympics to WWII Japan's most brutal POW camps, Hillenbrand's heart-wrenching new book is thousands of miles and a world away from the racing circuit of her bestselling Seabiscuit. But it's just as much a page-turner, and its hero, Louie Zamperini, is just as loveable: a disciplined champion racer who ran in the Berlin Olympics, he's a wit, a prankster, and a reformed juvenile delinquent who put his thieving skills to good use in the POW camps, In other words, Louie is a total charmer, a lover of life--whose will to live is cruelly tested when he becomes an Army Air Corps bombardier in 1941. The young Italian-American from Torrance, Calif., was expected to be the first to run a four-minute mile. After an astonishing but losing race at the 1936 Olympics, Louie was hoping for gold in the 1940 games. But war ended those dreams forever. In May 1943 his B-24 crashed into the Pacific. After a record-breaking 47 days adrift on a shark-encircled life raft with his pal and pilot, Russell Allen 'Phil' Phillips, they were captured by the Japanese. In the 'theater of cruelty' that was the Japanese POW camp network, Louie landed in the cruelest theaters of all: Omori and Naoetsu, under the control of Corp. Mutsuhiro Watanabe, a pathologically brutal sadist (called the Bird by camp inmates) who never killed his victims outright--his pleasure came from their slow, unending torment. After one beating, as Watanabe left Louie's cell, Louie saw on his face a 'soft languor.... It was an expression of sexual rapture.' And Louie, with his defiant and unbreakable spirit, was Watanabe's victim of choice. By war's end, Louie was near death. When Naoetsu was liberated in mid-August 1945, a depleted Louie's only thought was 'I'm free! I'm free! I'm free!' But as Hillenbrand shows, Louie was not yet free. Even as, returning stateside, he impulsively married the beautiful Cynthia Applewhite and tried to build a life, Louie remained in the Bird's clutches, haunted in his dreams, drinking to forget, and obsessed with vengeance. In one of several sections where Hillenbrand steps back for a larger view, she writes movingly of the thousands of postwar Pacific PTSD sufferers. With no help for their as yet unrecognized illness, Hillenbrand says, 'there was no one right way to peace; each man had to find his own path....' The book's final section is the story of how, with Cynthia's help, Louie found his path. It is impossible to condense the rich, granular detail of Hillenbrand's narrative of the atrocities committed (one man was exhibited naked in a Tokyo zoo for the Japanese to 'gawk at his filthy, sore-encrusted body') against American POWs in Japan, and the courage of Louie and his fellow POWs, who made attempts on Watanabe's life, committed sabotage, and risked their own lives to save others. Hillenbrand's triumph is that in telling Louie's story (he's now in his 90s), she tells the stories of thousands whose suffering has been mostly forgotten. She restores to our collective memory this tale of heroism, cruelty, life, death, joy, suffering, remorselessness, and redemption. (Nov.) -Reviewed by Sarah F. Gold" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Review:

"It is hugely refreshing when [a book] as fine as this one comes along. The research is meticulous, the writing elegant and concise, so that every page transports you back to the period. . . . This is a remarkable tale well told." The Economist

Review:

Synopsis:

In her long-awaited new book, Hillenbrand writes with the same rich and vivid narrative voice she displayed in Seabiscuit. Telling an unforgettable story of a young lieutenant's journey into extremity, Unbroken is a testament to the resilience of the human mind, body, and spirit.

Synopsis:

THE NEW YORK TIMES AND INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER

December, 1943: A badly damaged American bomber struggles to fly over wartime Germany. At the controls is twenty-one-year-old Second Lieutenant Charlie Brown. Half his crew lay wounded or dead on this, their first mission. Suddenly, a Messerschmitt fighter pulls up on the bomberand#8217;s tail. The pilot is German ace Franz Stiglerand#151;and he can destroy the young American crew with the squeeze of a trigger...and#160;

What happened next would defy imagination and later be called and#147;the most incredible encounter between enemies in World War II.and#8221;

The U.S. 8th Air Force would later classify what happened between them as and#147;top secret.and#8221; It was an act that Franz could never mention for fear of facing a firing squad. It was the encounter that would haunt both Charlie and Franz for forty years until, as old men, they would search the world for each other, a last mission that could change their lives forever.

INCLUDES PHOTOS

Synopsis:

Laura Hillenbrand is the author of the #1 New York Times bestseller Seabiscuit: An American Legend, which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, won the Book Sense Book of the Year Award and the William Hill Sports Book of the Year Award, landed on more than fifteen best-of-the-year lists, and inspired the film Seabiscuit, which was nominated for seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture. Hillenbrand’s New Yorker article, “A Sudden Illness,” won the 2004 National Magazine Award, and she is a two-time winner of the Eclipse Award, the highest journalistic honor in Thoroughbred racing. She and actor Gary Sinise are the co-founders of Operation International Children, a charity that provides school supplies to children through American troops. She lives in Washington, D.C.

Video

About the Author

More information to be announced soon on this forthcoming title from Penguin USA.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 131 comments:

Julie Matthies, June 11, 2013 (view all comments by Julie Matthies)
I've owned this book for quite some time but put off reading it because I'm not a huge fan of war movies or books. I don't like seeing or reading about violence so I try to avoid it. But this book got so many good reviews and I own it so after bumping it to "next month" since the beginning of this year, I finally bit the bullet and read it. And I'm glad I did? I'm not sure. I think Louis' story is amazing and it is important not to forget our history. I know I'm in the minority when I say this, but I wasn't in love with this book. I enjoyed reading about his childhood and his time in the Olympics but then the author lost me. I felt Louis' story got bogged down with facts and statistics that didn't really add to his story. That section of the book was painful for me to get through. I almost thought I didn't want to continue. I was glad I did though, and then I wasn't.

The story really picked up when he crashed into the Pacific. But then, when he was captured, the story was filled with so much violence, I was back to not enjoying it at all. I enjoyed it again once he was back home and found how he overcame his emotional scars incredibly encouraging and uplifting. I ended up rating this book 4* but how I got there was a roller coaster of 1* to 5*s depending on which section I was reading. I do think the author did an amazing amount of research while writing this book and I do recommend it to anyone who particularly enjoys reading about war.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 5 readers found this comment helpful)
dallard, January 30, 2013 (view all comments by dallard)
This is the best book I've ever read. Ms. Hillenbrand captures the events so well that I felt as though I was there with the most incredible man. He has set a standard of conquering my fears and dreams to an all time high. It's a must for people that want to read about true gut wrenching stories. I could not put the book down.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(3 of 5 readers found this comment helpful)
damonp3, January 30, 2013 (view all comments by damonp3)
The true World War II story of Louis Zamperini should be an inspiration to every red-blooded American. A tough and sometimes troubled young man and a brilliant world-class athlete, Louis volunteered to fight for his country, became a bombardier in the difficult-to-fly B-24 Liberator, crashed at sea and became a prisoner of the cruel Japanese. The portrayal of his grit and courage by Laura Hillenbrand read like a novel and kept me glued to every page.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(3 of 5 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 131 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9781400064168
Author:
Hillenbrand, Laura
Publisher:
Random House
Author:
Makos, Adam
Author:
Alexander, Larry
Subject:
General
Subject:
Military
Subject:
Military - World War II
Subject:
Military - United States
Subject:
General Biography
Subject:
Biography-Military
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20101131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
+ 16 page insert
Pages:
496
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1.13 lb
Age Level:
from 18

Other books you might like

  1. Cleopatra: A Life
    Used Trade Paper $6.50
  2. Pulitzer: A Life in Politics, Print,... Used Hardcover $4.50
  3. The Pattern in the Carpet: A... Used Trade Paper $5.50
  4. The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the...
    Used Hardcover $3.50
  5. Anne Frank: The Book, the Life, the... Used Trade Paper $8.00
  6. Robert A. Heinlein: In Dialogue with...
    New Hardcover $29.99

Related Subjects


Biography » Military
Featured Titles » Bestsellers
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » Military » General
History and Social Science » Military » US Military » General
History and Social Science » Military » World War II » Aviation
History and Social Science » Military » World War II » General
History and Social Science » Military » World War II » Nautical
History and Social Science » Military » World War II » Pacific

Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$19.50 In Stock
Product details 496 pages Random House - English 9781400064168 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "From the 1936 Olympics to WWII Japan's most brutal POW camps, Hillenbrand's heart-wrenching new book is thousands of miles and a world away from the racing circuit of her bestselling Seabiscuit. But it's just as much a page-turner, and its hero, Louie Zamperini, is just as loveable: a disciplined champion racer who ran in the Berlin Olympics, he's a wit, a prankster, and a reformed juvenile delinquent who put his thieving skills to good use in the POW camps, In other words, Louie is a total charmer, a lover of life--whose will to live is cruelly tested when he becomes an Army Air Corps bombardier in 1941. The young Italian-American from Torrance, Calif., was expected to be the first to run a four-minute mile. After an astonishing but losing race at the 1936 Olympics, Louie was hoping for gold in the 1940 games. But war ended those dreams forever. In May 1943 his B-24 crashed into the Pacific. After a record-breaking 47 days adrift on a shark-encircled life raft with his pal and pilot, Russell Allen 'Phil' Phillips, they were captured by the Japanese. In the 'theater of cruelty' that was the Japanese POW camp network, Louie landed in the cruelest theaters of all: Omori and Naoetsu, under the control of Corp. Mutsuhiro Watanabe, a pathologically brutal sadist (called the Bird by camp inmates) who never killed his victims outright--his pleasure came from their slow, unending torment. After one beating, as Watanabe left Louie's cell, Louie saw on his face a 'soft languor.... It was an expression of sexual rapture.' And Louie, with his defiant and unbreakable spirit, was Watanabe's victim of choice. By war's end, Louie was near death. When Naoetsu was liberated in mid-August 1945, a depleted Louie's only thought was 'I'm free! I'm free! I'm free!' But as Hillenbrand shows, Louie was not yet free. Even as, returning stateside, he impulsively married the beautiful Cynthia Applewhite and tried to build a life, Louie remained in the Bird's clutches, haunted in his dreams, drinking to forget, and obsessed with vengeance. In one of several sections where Hillenbrand steps back for a larger view, she writes movingly of the thousands of postwar Pacific PTSD sufferers. With no help for their as yet unrecognized illness, Hillenbrand says, 'there was no one right way to peace; each man had to find his own path....' The book's final section is the story of how, with Cynthia's help, Louie found his path. It is impossible to condense the rich, granular detail of Hillenbrand's narrative of the atrocities committed (one man was exhibited naked in a Tokyo zoo for the Japanese to 'gawk at his filthy, sore-encrusted body') against American POWs in Japan, and the courage of Louie and his fellow POWs, who made attempts on Watanabe's life, committed sabotage, and risked their own lives to save others. Hillenbrand's triumph is that in telling Louie's story (he's now in his 90s), she tells the stories of thousands whose suffering has been mostly forgotten. She restores to our collective memory this tale of heroism, cruelty, life, death, joy, suffering, remorselessness, and redemption. (Nov.) -Reviewed by Sarah F. Gold" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Review" by , "It is hugely refreshing when [a book] as fine as this one comes along. The research is meticulous, the writing elegant and concise, so that every page transports you back to the period. . . . This is a remarkable tale well told."
"Review" by ,
"Synopsis" by , In her long-awaited new book, Hillenbrand writes with the same rich and vivid narrative voice she displayed in Seabiscuit. Telling an unforgettable story of a young lieutenant's journey into extremity, Unbroken is a testament to the resilience of the human mind, body, and spirit.
"Synopsis" by ,
THE NEW YORK TIMES AND INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER

December, 1943: A badly damaged American bomber struggles to fly over wartime Germany. At the controls is twenty-one-year-old Second Lieutenant Charlie Brown. Half his crew lay wounded or dead on this, their first mission. Suddenly, a Messerschmitt fighter pulls up on the bomberand#8217;s tail. The pilot is German ace Franz Stiglerand#151;and he can destroy the young American crew with the squeeze of a trigger...and#160;

What happened next would defy imagination and later be called and#147;the most incredible encounter between enemies in World War II.and#8221;

The U.S. 8th Air Force would later classify what happened between them as and#147;top secret.and#8221; It was an act that Franz could never mention for fear of facing a firing squad. It was the encounter that would haunt both Charlie and Franz for forty years until, as old men, they would search the world for each other, a last mission that could change their lives forever.

INCLUDES PHOTOS

"Synopsis" by , Laura Hillenbrand is the author of the #1 New York Times bestseller Seabiscuit: An American Legend, which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, won the Book Sense Book of the Year Award and the William Hill Sports Book of the Year Award, landed on more than fifteen best-of-the-year lists, and inspired the film Seabiscuit, which was nominated for seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture. Hillenbrand’s New Yorker article, “A Sudden Illness,” won the 2004 National Magazine Award, and she is a two-time winner of the Eclipse Award, the highest journalistic honor in Thoroughbred racing. She and actor Gary Sinise are the co-founders of Operation International Children, a charity that provides school supplies to children through American troops. She lives in Washington, D.C.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.