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The Fourth Part of the World: The Race to the Ends of the Earth, and the Epic Story of the Map That Gave America Its Name

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The Fourth Part of the World: The Race to the Ends of the Earth, and the Epic Story of the Map That Gave America Its Name Cover

ISBN13: 9781416535317
ISBN10: 1416535314
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Review-A-Day

"Renaissance sophisticates sneered. How could a sleepy little backwoods town like Saint-Die in distant Lorraine, deep in upland pine forests, home to flax weavers and log sawyers, presume to rival the great centers of humanist learning at the beginning of the 16th century? Saint-Die seemed too poor and remote for glory and fame. Yet under the ambitious patronage of the young Duke Rene, a group of learned men gathered, around the town's printing press and cathedral library, to undertake an audacious project — overly rash, by the standards of the town's resources. They proposed to bring out an updated edition of the most acclaimed geographic text of classical antiquity — Ptolemy's Geography, compiled in the second century AD — and to supplement it with the new knowledge of the planet revealed by recent and current explorations." Felipe Fernandez-Armesto, The Wilson Quarterly (read the entire Wilson Quarterly review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Old maps lead you to strange and unexpected places, and none does so more ineluctably than the subject of this book: the giant, beguiling Waldseemuller world map of 1507. So begins this remarkable story of the map that gave America its name.

For millennia Europeans believed that the world consisted of three parts: Europe, Africa, and Asia. They drew the three continents in countless shapes and sizes on their maps, but occasionally they hinted at the existence of a fourth part of the world, a mysterious, inaccessible place, separated from the rest by a vast expanse of ocean. It was a land of myth — until 1507, that is, when Martin Waldseemuller and Matthias Ringmann, two obscure scholars working in the mountains of eastern France, made it real. Columbus had died the year before convinced that he had sailed to Asia, but Waldseemuller and Ringmann, after reading about the Atlantic discoveries of Columbus's contemporary Amerigo Vespucci, came to a startling conclusion: Vespucci had reached the fourth part of the world. To celebrate his achievement, Waldseemuller and Ringmann printed a huge map, for the first time showing the New World surrounded by water and distinct from Asia, and in Vespucci's honor they gave this New World a name: America.

The Fourth Part of the World is the story behind that map, a thrilling saga of geographical and intellectual exploration, full of outsize thinkers and voyages. Taking a kaleidoscopic approach, Toby Lester traces the origins of our modern worldview. His narrative sweeps across continents and centuries, zeroing in on different portions of the map to reveal strands of ancient legend, Biblical prophecy, classical learning, medieval exploration, imperial ambitions, and more. In Lester's telling the map comes alive: Marco Polo and the early Christian missionaries trek across Central Asia and China; Europe's early humanists travel to monastic libraries to recover ancient texts; Portuguese merchants round up the first West African slaves; Christopher Columbus and Amerigo Vespucci make their epic voyages of discovery; and finally, vitally, Nicholas Copernicus makes an appearance, deducing from the new geography shown on the Waldseemuller map that the earth could not lie at the center of the cosmos. The map literally altered humanity's worldview.

One thousand copies of the map were printed, yet only one remains. Discovered accidentally in 1901 in the library of a German castle it was bought in 2003 for the unprecedented sum of $10 million by the Library of Congress, where it is now on permanent public display. Lavishly illustrated with rare maps and diagrams, The Fourth Part of the World is the story of that map: the dazzling story of the geographical and intellectual journeys that have helped us decipher our world.

Review:

"With the excitement and exhilaration of an explorer, Atlantic contributor Lester sets off on his own journey of discovery across the seas of cartography and history. In 2003, the Library of Congress paid $10 million for the only existing copy of the 1507 map that was the first to show the New World and call it 'America.' Lester ranges over the history of cartography, such as the zonal maps of the Middle Ages that divided the world into three parts — Africa, Europe and Asia. In 1507, Martin Waldseemller and Matthias Ringmann, working with a small group of scholars in a small town in eastern France produced their map, based on Amerigo Vespucci's voyages to the West and discovery of South America. In just a few decades the Waldseemller map was out of date, but its world-changing status lived on, and in 1901 a Jesuit priest, poking around a small German castle, stumbled on a copy. Lester traces the map's journey to America over the next century in a majestic tribute to a historic work. First serial to Smithsonian magazine. (Nov. 3)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

The Fourth Part of the World is an epic adventure story about the creation of the map that introduced Europe to America and ushered in the New World.

About the Author

Toby Lester is a contributing editor to and has written for The Atlantic on subjects that include the sociology of new religions, the attempt to reconstruct ancient Greek music, the struggle to change alphabets in Azerbaijan, and the chance harmonies of everyday sounds. His work has also been featured on the radio show This American Life. This is his first book.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

marcthomas7, June 12, 2010 (view all comments by marcthomas7)
The Fourth Part of the World

It may not be possible to turn to a highly detailed, scholastically rigorous history of the medieval and Renaissance world into an enjoyable page turner, but the Fourth Part of the World comes very close. Toby Lester has been able to turn his beginning chapters which recount the search for the mysterious Waldseemuller map into an exciting historical detective story.
The author then completes an arc from the discovery of the Waldseemuller map in 1901 back to medieval Europe's rediscovery of the Greek geographer,Ptolemy through the early European age of discovery back to the creation of the Waldseemuller map in 1507. In doing so, Toby Lester gives an interesting revisionist take on the relationship between medieval Europe and the Mongols at the height of the Great Khans' power. He goes on to deflate the conventional image of the great Christopher Columbus, showing Columbus as he was viewed by his contemporaries as just another explorer among many explorers. Lester unravels the puzzle of why America was named after Amerigo Vespucci.
The author strings his narrative together with maps, but you do not need to be a cartographer to understand and appreciate his work. Anyone with a vague knowledge of history between 1200-1500 will have no trouble with this book.


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Product Details

ISBN:
9781416535317
Subtitle:
The Race to the Ends of the Earth, and the Epic Story of the Map That Gave America Its Name
Author:
Lester, Toby
Publisher:
Free Press
Subject:
Europe - General
Subject:
Expeditions & Discoveries
Subject:
Maps
Subject:
History
Subject:
Atlases - U.S.
Subject:
General History
Subject:
Polo, Marco
Subject:
America Name.
Subject:
Cartography
Subject:
World History-General
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20091103
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
480
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
History and Social Science » Exploration » General
History and Social Science » Exploration » New World
History and Social Science » World History » General
Travel » Travel Writing » Exploration

The Fourth Part of the World: The Race to the Ends of the Earth, and the Epic Story of the Map That Gave America Its Name Used Hardcover
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$10.50 In Stock
Product details 480 pages Free Press - English 9781416535317 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "With the excitement and exhilaration of an explorer, Atlantic contributor Lester sets off on his own journey of discovery across the seas of cartography and history. In 2003, the Library of Congress paid $10 million for the only existing copy of the 1507 map that was the first to show the New World and call it 'America.' Lester ranges over the history of cartography, such as the zonal maps of the Middle Ages that divided the world into three parts — Africa, Europe and Asia. In 1507, Martin Waldseemller and Matthias Ringmann, working with a small group of scholars in a small town in eastern France produced their map, based on Amerigo Vespucci's voyages to the West and discovery of South America. In just a few decades the Waldseemller map was out of date, but its world-changing status lived on, and in 1901 a Jesuit priest, poking around a small German castle, stumbled on a copy. Lester traces the map's journey to America over the next century in a majestic tribute to a historic work. First serial to Smithsonian magazine. (Nov. 3)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "Renaissance sophisticates sneered. How could a sleepy little backwoods town like Saint-Die in distant Lorraine, deep in upland pine forests, home to flax weavers and log sawyers, presume to rival the great centers of humanist learning at the beginning of the 16th century? Saint-Die seemed too poor and remote for glory and fame. Yet under the ambitious patronage of the young Duke Rene, a group of learned men gathered, around the town's printing press and cathedral library, to undertake an audacious project — overly rash, by the standards of the town's resources. They proposed to bring out an updated edition of the most acclaimed geographic text of classical antiquity — Ptolemy's Geography, compiled in the second century AD — and to supplement it with the new knowledge of the planet revealed by recent and current explorations." (read the entire Wilson Quarterly review)
"Synopsis" by , The Fourth Part of the World is an epic adventure story about the creation of the map that introduced Europe to America and ushered in the New World.
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