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2 Burnside Recovery and Addiction- Drug and Alcohol Addiction

Her Best-Kept Secret: Why Women Drink-And How They Can Regain Control

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the first book to document that American women are drinking more often than ever, and in ever-larger quantities, journalist Gabrielle Glaser explores the reasons behind this hiding-in-plain-sight epidemic—and why the most common remedy for it, enrollment in AA, is particularly ineffective.

Gabrielle Glaser began noticing a shift in culture after the birth of her third child, when friends and neighbors dropped off baby clothes—and loads of wine. One note said, "One bottle for you, one to share." Why, Glaser wondered, would she drink a bottle of wine by herself? She was nursing, for God's sake. But alcohol—and wine, in particular—is an acceptable, legal way for women to muscle through their lives, whether they are postfeminist breadwinners or stay-at-home mothers. It's a drug women can respectfully use in public and in private, even if it carries the risk of taking them under.

Women of all ages are drinking more, while men's alcohol use is staying the same. They are hitting the bottle to ease pressure from work, the stress of teething toddlers, the anxiety of trying teenagers, and the guilt of aging, faraway parents. Young women pound shots of tequila; women in their thirties, forties, and fifties guzzle secret bottles of wine as they cook dinner; and even senior citizens say they regularly down more than four drinks at one sitting several times a month. Between 1992 and 2007, the number of middle-aged women who entered alcohol treatment programs nearly tripled. In this book, Glaser investigates the problem and traces the history of women and alcohol in America, leading up to today when, for the first time, women are beginning to question the common prescription for abuse: AA.

Glaser shows how this problem is beginning to be aired in public, just as a new kind of treatment tailored to women’s bodies and psyches is taking hold. Her Best-Kept Secret is a meticulously researched, eye-opening look into an ever-growing affliction that cannot be ignored.

Review:

"Over the past century, American women have progressed from sipping in seclusion to enjoying the occasional cocktail in public following WWII, to downing wine today like characters from Sex and the City. In fact, from 1992 to 2007, the number of middle-aged women who sought help getting sober in various treatment programs almost tripled. Journalist Glaser (Strangers to the Tribe) traces the increasingly besotted history of women's relationship with alcohol (focusing mostly on middle-class women), but she becomes particularly insightful and provocative as she argues against the efficacy of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) for women. Rather than guiding women down a healing path of humility and acceptance, AA and its Twelve Steps, Glaser argues, have failed to protect women from predatory men, thereby consigning many already insecure and anxious women to failure. In lieu of AA, Glaser investigates new majority-female programs, as well as a seldom-prescribed medication called naltrexone, which is similar to Chantix. Conversational and persuasive — as if Vicki Iovine had written a Girlfriend's Guide to getting sober — this quick read is full of encouraging and informative advice, and it's sure to ignite renewed discussion about one-size-fits-all treatment options. 8-page b&w photo insert. Agent: Glen Hartley and Lynn Chu, Writers' Representatives LLC. (July)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Whatand#8217;s the first thing many women do when they go home? Make a dash for the white wine in the refrigerator.andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt;In Her Best-Kept Secret, journalist Gabrielle Glaser uncovers this hidden-in-plain-sight drinking epidemicand#8212;but doesnand#8217;t cause you to recoil in alarm. She is the first to document that American women are drinking more often than ever and in ever larger quantities. And she is the first to show that contrary to the impression fostered by reality shows and Gossip Girl, young women alone are not driving these statisticsand#8212;their moms and grandmothers are, too. But Glaser doesnand#8217;t wag a finger. Instead, in a funny and tender voice, Glaser looks at the roots of the problem, explores the strange history of women and alcohol in America, drills into the emerging and counterintuitive science about that relationship, and asks: Are women really getting the help they need? Is it possible to come back from beyond the sipping point and develop a healthy relationship with the bottle?andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt;Glaser reveals that, for many women, joining Alcoholics Anonymous is not the answerand#8212;it is part of the problem. She shows that as scientists and health professionals learn more about womenand#8217;s particular reactions to alcohol, they are coming up with new and more effective approaches to excessive drinking. In that sense, Glaser offers modern solutions to a very modern problem.

Synopsis:

In the first book to document that American women are drinking more often than ever, and in ever-larger quantities, journalist Gabrielle Glaser explores the reasons behind this hiding-in-plain-sight epidemic—and why the most common remedy for it, enrollment in AA, is particularly ineffective.

Gabrielle Glaser began noticing a shift in culture after the birth of her third child, when friends and neighbors dropped off baby clothes—and loads of wine. One note said, "One bottle for you, one to share." Why, Glaser wondered, would she drink a bottle of wine by herself? She was nursing, for God's sake. But alcohol—and wine, in particular—is an acceptable, legal way for women to muscle through their lives, whether they are postfeminist breadwinners or stay-at-home mothers. It's a drug women can respectfully use in public and in private, even if it carries the risk of taking them under.

Women of all ages are drinking more, while men's alcohol use is staying the same. They are hitting the bottle to ease pressure from work, the stress of teething toddlers, the anxiety of trying teenagers, and the guilt of aging, faraway parents. Young women pound shots of tequila; women in their thirties, forties, and fifties guzzle secret bottles of wine as they cook dinner; and even senior citizens say they regularly down more than four drinks at one sitting several times a month. Between 1992 and 2007, the number of middle-aged women who entered alcohol treatment programs nearly tripled. In this book, Glaser investigates the problem and traces the history of women and alcohol in America, leading up to today when, for the first time, women are beginning to question the common prescription for abuse: AA.

Glaser shows how this problem is beginning to be aired in public, just as a new kind of treatment tailored to women’s bodies and psyches is taking hold. Her Best-Kept Secret is a meticulously researched, eye-opening look into an ever-growing affliction that cannot be ignored.

About the Author

Gabrielle Glaserandlt;Bandgt; andlt;/Bandgt;is the author of andlt;iandgt;Strangers to the Tribe andlt;/iandgt;and andlt;iandgt;The Nose, andlt;/iandgt;and a journalist whose work has appeared in andlt;iandgt;The New York Times, Mademoiselle, The Economistandlt;/iandgt;, andlt;iandgt;Glamour, The Washington Post, andlt;/iandgt;and andlt;iandgt;Health, andlt;/iandgt;among other publications.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781439184387
Subtitle:
Why Women Drink-And How They Can Regain Control
Author:
Glaser, Gabrielle
Author:
r, Gabrielle
Author:
Glase
Publisher:
Simon and Schuster
Subject:
Addictions
Subject:
Recovery and Addiction - Drug and Alcohol Addiction
Subject:
Women's Studies
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
20130702
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
1 8-pp bandamp;w photo insert
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
8.38 x 5.5 in

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Recovery and Addiction » Drug and Alcohol Addiction
Health and Self-Help » Recovery and Addiction » General
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » General
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Womens Studies

Her Best-Kept Secret: Why Women Drink-And How They Can Regain Control Used Hardcover
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Product details 256 pages Simon & Schuster - English 9781439184387 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Over the past century, American women have progressed from sipping in seclusion to enjoying the occasional cocktail in public following WWII, to downing wine today like characters from Sex and the City. In fact, from 1992 to 2007, the number of middle-aged women who sought help getting sober in various treatment programs almost tripled. Journalist Glaser (Strangers to the Tribe) traces the increasingly besotted history of women's relationship with alcohol (focusing mostly on middle-class women), but she becomes particularly insightful and provocative as she argues against the efficacy of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) for women. Rather than guiding women down a healing path of humility and acceptance, AA and its Twelve Steps, Glaser argues, have failed to protect women from predatory men, thereby consigning many already insecure and anxious women to failure. In lieu of AA, Glaser investigates new majority-female programs, as well as a seldom-prescribed medication called naltrexone, which is similar to Chantix. Conversational and persuasive — as if Vicki Iovine had written a Girlfriend's Guide to getting sober — this quick read is full of encouraging and informative advice, and it's sure to ignite renewed discussion about one-size-fits-all treatment options. 8-page b&w photo insert. Agent: Glen Hartley and Lynn Chu, Writers' Representatives LLC. (July)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , Whatand#8217;s the first thing many women do when they go home? Make a dash for the white wine in the refrigerator.andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt;In Her Best-Kept Secret, journalist Gabrielle Glaser uncovers this hidden-in-plain-sight drinking epidemicand#8212;but doesnand#8217;t cause you to recoil in alarm. She is the first to document that American women are drinking more often than ever and in ever larger quantities. And she is the first to show that contrary to the impression fostered by reality shows and Gossip Girl, young women alone are not driving these statisticsand#8212;their moms and grandmothers are, too. But Glaser doesnand#8217;t wag a finger. Instead, in a funny and tender voice, Glaser looks at the roots of the problem, explores the strange history of women and alcohol in America, drills into the emerging and counterintuitive science about that relationship, and asks: Are women really getting the help they need? Is it possible to come back from beyond the sipping point and develop a healthy relationship with the bottle?andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt;Glaser reveals that, for many women, joining Alcoholics Anonymous is not the answerand#8212;it is part of the problem. She shows that as scientists and health professionals learn more about womenand#8217;s particular reactions to alcohol, they are coming up with new and more effective approaches to excessive drinking. In that sense, Glaser offers modern solutions to a very modern problem.
"Synopsis" by , In the first book to document that American women are drinking more often than ever, and in ever-larger quantities, journalist Gabrielle Glaser explores the reasons behind this hiding-in-plain-sight epidemic—and why the most common remedy for it, enrollment in AA, is particularly ineffective.

Gabrielle Glaser began noticing a shift in culture after the birth of her third child, when friends and neighbors dropped off baby clothes—and loads of wine. One note said, "One bottle for you, one to share." Why, Glaser wondered, would she drink a bottle of wine by herself? She was nursing, for God's sake. But alcohol—and wine, in particular—is an acceptable, legal way for women to muscle through their lives, whether they are postfeminist breadwinners or stay-at-home mothers. It's a drug women can respectfully use in public and in private, even if it carries the risk of taking them under.

Women of all ages are drinking more, while men's alcohol use is staying the same. They are hitting the bottle to ease pressure from work, the stress of teething toddlers, the anxiety of trying teenagers, and the guilt of aging, faraway parents. Young women pound shots of tequila; women in their thirties, forties, and fifties guzzle secret bottles of wine as they cook dinner; and even senior citizens say they regularly down more than four drinks at one sitting several times a month. Between 1992 and 2007, the number of middle-aged women who entered alcohol treatment programs nearly tripled. In this book, Glaser investigates the problem and traces the history of women and alcohol in America, leading up to today when, for the first time, women are beginning to question the common prescription for abuse: AA.

Glaser shows how this problem is beginning to be aired in public, just as a new kind of treatment tailored to women’s bodies and psyches is taking hold. Her Best-Kept Secret is a meticulously researched, eye-opening look into an ever-growing affliction that cannot be ignored.

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