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Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder

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Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder Cover

ISBN13: 9781565126053
ISBN10: 156512605x
Condition: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"I like to play indoors better 'cause that's where all the electrical outlets are," reports a fourth-grader. Never before in history have children been so plugged in--and so out of touch with the natural world. In this groundbreaking new work, child advocacy expert Richard Louv directly links the lack of nature in the lives of today's wired generation--he calls it nature deficit--to some of the most disturbing childhood trends, such as rises in obesity, Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), and depression.

Some startling facts: By the 1990s the radius around the home where children were allowed to roam on their own had shrunk to a ninth of what it had been in 1970. Today, average eight-year-olds are better able to identify cartoon characters than native species, such as beetles and oak trees, in their own community. The rate at which doctors prescribe antidepressants to children has doubled in the last five years, and recent studies show that too much computer use spells trouble for the developing mind.

Nature-deficit disorder is not a medical condition; it is a description of the human costs of alienation from nature. This alienation damages children and shapes adults, families, and communities. There are solutions, though, and they're right in our own backyards. Last child in the Woods is the first book to bring together cutting-edge research showing that direct exposure to nature is essential for healthy childhood development--physical, emotional, and spiritual. What's more, nature is a potent therapy for depression, obesity, and ADD. Environment-based education dramatically improves standardized test scores and grade point averages and develops skills in problem solving, critical thinking, and decision making. Even creativity is stimulated by childhood experiences in nature.

Yet sending kids outside to play is increasingly difficult. Computers, television, and video games compete for their time, of course, but it's also our fears of traffic, strangers, even virus-carrying mosquitoes--fears the media exploit--that keep children indoors. Meanwhile, schools assign more and more homework, and there is less and less access to natural areas.

Parents have the power to ensure that their daughter or son will not be the "last child in the woods," and this book is the first step toward that nature-child reunion.

Synopsis:

“I like to play indoors better ’cause that’s where all the electrical outlets are,” reports a fourth grader. But it’s not only computers, television, and video games that are keeping kids inside. It’s also their parents’ fears of traffic, strangers, Lyme disease, and West Nile virus; their schools’ emphasis on more and more homework; their structured schedules; and their lack of access to natural areas. Local governments, neighborhood associations, and even organizations devoted to the outdoors are placing legal and regulatory constraints on many wild spaces, sometimes making natural play a crime.

As children’s connections to nature diminish and the social, psychological, and spiritual implications become apparent, new research shows that nature can offer powerful therapy for such maladies as depression, obesity, and attentiondeficit disorder. Environment-based education dramatically improves standardized test scores and grade-point averages and develops skills in problem solving, critical thinking, and decision making. Anecdotal evidence strongly suggests that childhood experiences in nature stimulate creativity.

In Last Child in the Woods, Louv talks with parents, children, teachers, scientists, religious leaders, child-development researchers, and environmentalists who recognize the threat and offer solutions. Louv shows us an alternative future, one in which parents help their kids experience the natural world more deeply—and find the joy of family connectedness in the process.

Synopsis:

“The children and nature movement is fueled by this fundamental idea: the child in nature is an endangered species, and the health of children and the health of the Earth are inseparable.” —Richard Louv, from the new edition

In his landmark work Last Child in the Woods, Richard Louv brought together cutting-edge studies that pointed to direct exposure to nature as essential for a child’s healthy physical and emotional development. Now this new edition updates the growing body of evidence linking the lack of nature in children’s lives and the rise in obesity, attention disorders, and depression. Louv’s message has galvanized an international back-to-nature campaign to “Leave No Child Inside.” His book will change the way you think about our future and the future of our children.

“[The] national movement to ‘leave no child inside’ . . . has been the focus of Capitol Hill hearings, state legislative action, grass-roots projects, a U.S. Forest Service initiative to get more children into the woods and a national effort to promote a ‘green hour’ in each day. . . . The increased activism has been partly inspired by a best-selling book, Last Child in the Woods, and its author, Richard Louv.” —The Washington Post

Last Child in the Woods, which describes a generation so plugged into electronic diversions that it has lost its connection to the natural world, is helping drive a movement quickly flourishing across the nation.” —The Nation’s Health

 “This book is an absolute must-read for parents.” —The Boston Globe
 
Now includes
A Field Guide with 100 Practical Actions We Can Take 
Discussion Points for Book Groups, Classrooms, and Communities 
Additional Notes by the Author 
New and Updated Research from the U.S. and Abroad

Synopsis:

At no time in human history have we been more disconnected with what lies outside our front doors. Within just a century, our relationship with our surroundings has transformed from one of exploration to one of disassociation. In This Book Was a Tree, science teacher Marcie Cuff issues a call for a new era of pioneersand#151;not leathery, backwoods deerskin-wearing salt pork and hominy pioneers, but strong-minded, clever, crafty, mudpie-making, fort-building individuals committed to examining the natural world and deciphering natureand#8217;s perplexing puzzles.

Within each chapter, readers will discover a principle for reconnecting with the natural world around them, from learning to be still to discovering the importance of giving back. With a mix of science and hands-on crafts and activities, readers will be encouraged to brainstorm, imagine, and understand the world as inventive scientistsand#151;to touch, collect, document, sketch, decode, analyze, experiment, unravel, interpret, compare, and reflect.

and#160;

About the Author

RICHARD LOUV, a columnist for the San Diego Union-Tribune, has written for national publications, including theNew York Times, the Washington Post, and the Christian Science Monitor, and has appeared on Good Morning America, Today, and NPRand#8217;s Fresh Airand Talk of the Nation. He is the author of seven books about family, nature, and community.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments xi

Introduction 1

Part I : The New Relationship Between Children and Nature

1. Gifts of Nature . . . . 7

2. The Third Frontier . . . . . . 15

3. The Criminalization of Natural Play . . . . . 27

Part II:Why the Young (and the Rest of Us) Need Nature

4. Climbing the Tree of Health . .. 39

5. A Life of the Senses: Nature vs. the Know-It-All State of Mind . . . . . 54

6. The “Eighth Intelligence” . . . 70

7. The Genius of Childhood: How Nature Nurtures Creativity . . .. 85

8. Nature-Deficit Disorder and the Restorative Environment . . . 98

Part III: The Best of Intentions: Why Johnnie and Jeannie Dont Play Outside Anymore

9. Time and Fear .. . . 115

10. The Bogeyman Syndrome Redux . . . . . 123

11. Dont Know Much About Natural History: Education as a Barrier to Nature .. 132

12. Where Will Future Stewards of Nature Come From? . . . 145

Part IV: The Nature-Child Reunion

13. Bringing Nature Home . . . 161

14. Scared Smart: Facing the Bogeyman . . . . 176

15. Telling Turtle Tales: Using Nature as a Moral Teacher . 187

Part V: The Jungle Blackboard

16. Natural School Reform . . . 201

17. Camp Revival . . . 223

Part VI: Wonder Land: Opening the Fourth Frontier

18. The Education of Judge Thatcher: Decriminalizing Natural Play . .. 233

19. Cities Gone Wild . .. 239

20. Where the Wild Things Will Be: A New Back-to-the-Land Movement . . . . 265

Part VII: To Be Amazed

21. The Spiritual Necessity of Nature for the Young . . . . . . 285

22. Fire and Fermentation: Building a Movement . . . . 301

23. While It Lasts . . . . 309

Notes 311

Suggested Reading 321

Index 325

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 5 comments:

SM4, January 2, 2012 (view all comments by SM4)
What an eye-opening book on why children and youth need nature to help them to be creative, healthy and better concentration for school and work. I love in section 16 when the author mentioned how natural education in the schools help students be better in school, good peer relationships, and other benefits. Louv discovered Portland's Environmental Middle School and said about the school as "teachers employ a curriculum using local rivers, mountains, and forests; among other activities, they plant native species and study the Willamette River. At that school, 96 percent of students meet or exceed state standards for math problem-solving--compared to only 65 percent of eight-graders at comparable middle schools" (p.207-8).
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
Britton Gildersleeve, September 20, 2011 (view all comments by Britton Gildersleeve)
Every parent, teacher and school admin should read this. So should the rest of America. Louv makes an eloquent case for why America's children are victims of Nature Deficit Disorder. He convinced me ~
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
Britton Gildersleeve, September 20, 2011 (view all comments by Britton Gildersleeve)
Every parent, teacher and school admin should read this. So should the rest of America. Louv makes an eloquent case for why America's children are victims of Nature Deficit Disorder. He convinced me ~
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 5 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9781565126053
Subtitle:
Saving Our Children From Nature-Deficit Disorder
Author:
Louv, Richard
Author:
Hoffmeister, Peter B.
Author:
Hoffmeister, Peter Brown
Author:
Cuff, Marcie Chambers
Publisher:
Algonquin Books
Subject:
Parenting - General
Subject:
General
Subject:
Psychotherapy - Child & Adolescent
Subject:
Parenting
Subject:
Nature - General
Subject:
Child Development
Subject:
Nature
Subject:
Psychological aspects
Subject:
Nature -- Psychological aspects.
Subject:
Children and the environment
Subject:
Child Care and Parenting-General
Subject:
Creativity
Subject:
FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS / Child Development
Subject:
Nature Studies-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paperback
Publication Date:
20080422
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
line drawings throughout
Pages:
390
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 in
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects


Children's » General
Health and Self-Help » Child Care and Parenting » General
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » General
Home and Garden » Gardening » Gardening for Children
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » General
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » Natural History » General

Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder Used Trade Paper
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$10.50 In Stock
Product details 390 pages Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill - English 9781565126053 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , “I like to play indoors better ’cause that’s where all the electrical outlets are,” reports a fourth grader. But it’s not only computers, television, and video games that are keeping kids inside. It’s also their parents’ fears of traffic, strangers, Lyme disease, and West Nile virus; their schools’ emphasis on more and more homework; their structured schedules; and their lack of access to natural areas. Local governments, neighborhood associations, and even organizations devoted to the outdoors are placing legal and regulatory constraints on many wild spaces, sometimes making natural play a crime.

As children’s connections to nature diminish and the social, psychological, and spiritual implications become apparent, new research shows that nature can offer powerful therapy for such maladies as depression, obesity, and attentiondeficit disorder. Environment-based education dramatically improves standardized test scores and grade-point averages and develops skills in problem solving, critical thinking, and decision making. Anecdotal evidence strongly suggests that childhood experiences in nature stimulate creativity.

In Last Child in the Woods, Louv talks with parents, children, teachers, scientists, religious leaders, child-development researchers, and environmentalists who recognize the threat and offer solutions. Louv shows us an alternative future, one in which parents help their kids experience the natural world more deeply—and find the joy of family connectedness in the process.

"Synopsis" by ,
“The children and nature movement is fueled by this fundamental idea: the child in nature is an endangered species, and the health of children and the health of the Earth are inseparable.” —Richard Louv, from the new edition

In his landmark work Last Child in the Woods, Richard Louv brought together cutting-edge studies that pointed to direct exposure to nature as essential for a child’s healthy physical and emotional development. Now this new edition updates the growing body of evidence linking the lack of nature in children’s lives and the rise in obesity, attention disorders, and depression. Louv’s message has galvanized an international back-to-nature campaign to “Leave No Child Inside.” His book will change the way you think about our future and the future of our children.

“[The] national movement to ‘leave no child inside’ . . . has been the focus of Capitol Hill hearings, state legislative action, grass-roots projects, a U.S. Forest Service initiative to get more children into the woods and a national effort to promote a ‘green hour’ in each day. . . . The increased activism has been partly inspired by a best-selling book, Last Child in the Woods, and its author, Richard Louv.” —The Washington Post

Last Child in the Woods, which describes a generation so plugged into electronic diversions that it has lost its connection to the natural world, is helping drive a movement quickly flourishing across the nation.” —The Nation’s Health

 “This book is an absolute must-read for parents.” —The Boston Globe
 
Now includes
A Field Guide with 100 Practical Actions We Can Take 
Discussion Points for Book Groups, Classrooms, and Communities 
Additional Notes by the Author 
New and Updated Research from the U.S. and Abroad
"Synopsis" by ,
At no time in human history have we been more disconnected with what lies outside our front doors. Within just a century, our relationship with our surroundings has transformed from one of exploration to one of disassociation. In This Book Was a Tree, science teacher Marcie Cuff issues a call for a new era of pioneersand#151;not leathery, backwoods deerskin-wearing salt pork and hominy pioneers, but strong-minded, clever, crafty, mudpie-making, fort-building individuals committed to examining the natural world and deciphering natureand#8217;s perplexing puzzles.

Within each chapter, readers will discover a principle for reconnecting with the natural world around them, from learning to be still to discovering the importance of giving back. With a mix of science and hands-on crafts and activities, readers will be encouraged to brainstorm, imagine, and understand the world as inventive scientistsand#151;to touch, collect, document, sketch, decode, analyze, experiment, unravel, interpret, compare, and reflect.

and#160;

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