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Googled: The End of the World As We Know It

by

Googled: The End of the World As We Know It Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A fresh perspective on the ongoing war for media profits, and why the ultimate winners will surprise people

Every day brings new headlines about the decline of traditional media powerhouses like Time Inc. and the triumph of digital native media like Buzzfeed, the Huffington Post, and Politico. Old media giants like the New York Times are betting everything on their digital offerings to replace the shrinking revenue from traditional advertising.

But the ugly truth, argues Michael Wolff, is that digital media isnt working for any content creator, old or new. Sure, Google and Facebook make a fortune selling online advertising—but theyre aggregators, not creators. Both old and new media are barely making any money from online text. And as major advertisers conclude that banner ads next to text basically dont work, they flock back to the one format that still gets big results: television. The value of an eyeballs attention to digital media has plummeted, while the value of a television eyeball continues to increase.

Of course television isnt what it used to be—its now “an almost unquantifiable flood of video across ever-present multiple screens, witty, informative, specialized, erudite, culturally prescient and perceptive (along with low and empty), that more and more annotates, curates, and informs most aspects, and hours, of our lives.”

Wolff shows how the leaders in digital media, from the mighty platforms to brand name magazine and news sites, are now trying to become video producers and to effectively put themselves into the television business as distributors and programmers. Native advertising and sponsored content are the new forms of soap opera. Television, by any other name, is the game everybody is trying to win—from Netflix to YouTube to the Wall Street Journal.

The result is both a new golden age of television—a competition for discerning niche audiences willing to pay big fees—and a commodity age, because the more video you make and own, without much regard for quality, the more advertising dollars you accrue. Wolff predicts what will happen during the next few years of this gold rush and war for survival.

Review:

"Two Googles emerge in this savvy profile of the Internet search octopus. The first is the actual company, with its mixture of business acumen and nave idealism ('Don't Be Evil' is the corporate slogan); its brilliant engineering feats and grad-students-at-play company culture; its geek founders, Sergey Brin and Larry Page, two billionaires who imbibe their antiestablishment rectitude straight from Burning Man; its pseudo-altruistic quest to offer all the world's information for free while selling all the world's advertising at a hefty profit. The second Google is a monstrous metaphor for all the creative destruction that the Internet has wrought on the crumbling titans of old media, who find themselves desperately wondering how they will make money off of news, music, video and books now that people can Google up all these things without paying a dime. The first Google makes for a standard-issue tech-industry grunge-to-riches business story, its main entertainment value being Brin's and Page's comical lack of social graces. But New Yorker columnist Auletta (World War 3.0: Microsoft and Its Enemies) makes the second Google a starting point for a sharp and probing analysis of the apocalyptic upheavals in the media and entertainment industries." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Auletta provides the fullest account ever told of Google's rise, shares the secret of Google's success, and shows why the worlds of new and old media often communicate as if residents of different planets.

Synopsis:

David versus Goliath in Silicon Valley—an epic attempt to take back the Internet

Their idea was simple. Four NYU undergrads wanted to build a social network that would allow users to control their personal data, instead of surrendering it to big businesses like Facebook. They called it Diaspora. In days, they raised $200,000, and reporters, venture capitalists, and the digital communitys most legendary figures

were soon monitoring their progress. Max dreamed of being a CEO. Ilya was the idealist. Dan coded like a pro, and Rafi tried to keep them all on track. But as the months passed and the money ran out, the Diaspora Four fell victim to errors, bad decisions, and their own hubris. In November 2011, Ilya committed suicide.

Diaspora has been tech news since day one, but the story reaches far beyond Silicon Valley to the now urgent issues about the future of the Internet. With the cooperation of the surviving partners, New York Times bestselling author Jim Dwyer tells a riveting story of four ambitious and naÏve young men who tried to rebottle the genie of personal privacy—and paid the ultimate price.

Synopsis:

"The fullest account yet of the rise of one of the most profitable, most powerful, and oddest businesses the world has ever seen."

-San Francisco Chronicle

Just eleven years old, Google has profoundly transformed the way we live and work-we've all been Googled. Esteemed media writer Ken Auletta uses the story of Google's rise to explore the future of media at large. This book is based on the most extensive cooperation ever granted a journalist, including access to closed-door meetings and interviews with industry legends, including Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, Marc Andreessen, and media guru "Coach" Bill Campbell. Auletta's unmatched analysis, vivid details, and rich anecdotes illuminate how the Google wave grew, how it threatens to drown media institutions, and where it's taking us next.

About the Author

Ken Auletta has written the “Annals of Communications” column and profiles for The New Yorker since 1992. He is the author of eight books, including Three Blind Mice, Greed and Glory on Wall Street, and World War 3.0. In naming him America’s premier media critic, the Columbia Journalism Review said, “No other reporter has covered the new communications revolution as thoroughly as has Auletta.” He lives in Manhattan with his wife and daughter.

Table of Contents

Googled Part One: Different Planets

Chapter One: Messing with the Magic

Part Two: The Google Story

Chapter Two: Starting in a Garage

Chapter Three: Buzz but Few Dollars (1999-2000)

Chapter Four: Prepping the Google Rocket (2001-2002)

Chapter Five: Innocence or Arrogance? (2002-2003)

Chapter Six: Google Goes Public (2004)

Chapter Seven: The New Evil Empire? (2004-2005)

Part Three: Google Versus the Bears

Chapter Eight: Chasing the Fox (2005-2006)

Chapter Nine: War on Multiple Fronts (2007)

Chapter Ten: Waking the Government Bear

Chapter Eleven: Google Enters Adolescence (2007-2008)

Chapter Twelve: Is "Old" Media Drowning? (2008)

Chapter Thirteen: Compete or Collaborate?

Chapter Fourteen: Happy Birthday (2008-2009)

Part Four: Googled

Chapter Fifteen: Googled

Chapter Sixteen: Where Is the Wave Taking Old Media?

Chapter Seventeen: Where Is the Wave Taking Google?

Acknowledgments

Notes

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9781594202353
Subtitle:
The Unexpected Triumph of Old Media In the Digital Age
Author:
Auletta, Ken
Author:
Ken Auletta
Author:
Dwyer, Jim
Author:
Wolff, Michael
Publisher:
Portfolio Hardcover
Subject:
Industries - Media & Communications Industries
Subject:
Popular Culture - General
Subject:
Internet searching
Subject:
Internet industry -- United States.
Subject:
Web search engines
Subject:
Corporate & Business History - General
Subject:
Business Communication
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
20150616
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 1 lb
Age Level:
17-17

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Related Subjects

Business » Business Profiles
Business » Communication
Business » General
Business » History and Biographies
Business » Writing
Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » General
Computers and Internet » Internet » General
Computers and Internet » Internet » Web » Search Engines
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » Sociology » General

Googled: The End of the World As We Know It Used Hardcover
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$4.50 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Penguin Press - English 9781594202353 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Two Googles emerge in this savvy profile of the Internet search octopus. The first is the actual company, with its mixture of business acumen and nave idealism ('Don't Be Evil' is the corporate slogan); its brilliant engineering feats and grad-students-at-play company culture; its geek founders, Sergey Brin and Larry Page, two billionaires who imbibe their antiestablishment rectitude straight from Burning Man; its pseudo-altruistic quest to offer all the world's information for free while selling all the world's advertising at a hefty profit. The second Google is a monstrous metaphor for all the creative destruction that the Internet has wrought on the crumbling titans of old media, who find themselves desperately wondering how they will make money off of news, music, video and books now that people can Google up all these things without paying a dime. The first Google makes for a standard-issue tech-industry grunge-to-riches business story, its main entertainment value being Brin's and Page's comical lack of social graces. But New Yorker columnist Auletta (World War 3.0: Microsoft and Its Enemies) makes the second Google a starting point for a sharp and probing analysis of the apocalyptic upheavals in the media and entertainment industries." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Auletta provides the fullest account ever told of Google's rise, shares the secret of Google's success, and shows why the worlds of new and old media often communicate as if residents of different planets.
"Synopsis" by ,
David versus Goliath in Silicon Valley—an epic attempt to take back the Internet

Their idea was simple. Four NYU undergrads wanted to build a social network that would allow users to control their personal data, instead of surrendering it to big businesses like Facebook. They called it Diaspora. In days, they raised $200,000, and reporters, venture capitalists, and the digital communitys most legendary figures

were soon monitoring their progress. Max dreamed of being a CEO. Ilya was the idealist. Dan coded like a pro, and Rafi tried to keep them all on track. But as the months passed and the money ran out, the Diaspora Four fell victim to errors, bad decisions, and their own hubris. In November 2011, Ilya committed suicide.

Diaspora has been tech news since day one, but the story reaches far beyond Silicon Valley to the now urgent issues about the future of the Internet. With the cooperation of the surviving partners, New York Times bestselling author Jim Dwyer tells a riveting story of four ambitious and naÏve young men who tried to rebottle the genie of personal privacy—and paid the ultimate price.

"Synopsis" by ,
"The fullest account yet of the rise of one of the most profitable, most powerful, and oddest businesses the world has ever seen."

-San Francisco Chronicle

Just eleven years old, Google has profoundly transformed the way we live and work-we've all been Googled. Esteemed media writer Ken Auletta uses the story of Google's rise to explore the future of media at large. This book is based on the most extensive cooperation ever granted a journalist, including access to closed-door meetings and interviews with industry legends, including Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, Marc Andreessen, and media guru "Coach" Bill Campbell. Auletta's unmatched analysis, vivid details, and rich anecdotes illuminate how the Google wave grew, how it threatens to drown media institutions, and where it's taking us next.

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