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Kill All Your Darlings: Pieces, 1990-2005

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ISBN13: 9781891241536
ISBN10: 1891241532
Condition: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In his books and in a string of wide-ranging and inventive essays, Luc Sante has shown himself to be not only one of our pre-eminent stylists, but also a critic of uncommon power and range.

Kill All Your Darlings is the first collection of Sante's articles — many of which first appeared in the New York Review of Books and the Village Voice — and offers ample justification for this high praise. Sante is best known for his ground-breaking work in urban history (Low Life), and for a particularly penetrating form of autobiography (The Factory of Facts). These subjects are also reflected in several essays here, but it is the author's intense and scrupulous writing about music, painting, photography, and poetry that takes center stage.

Alongside meditations on cigarettes, factory work, and hipness, and the critical tour de force, "The Invention of the Blues," Sante offers his incomparable take on icons from Arthur Rimbaud to Bob Dylan, René Magritte to Tintin, Buddy Bolden to Walker Evans, Allen Ginsberg to Robert Mapplethorpe.

Review:

"'New York City is fated always to remain my home,' writes Sante, who became permanently linked with the city through the underground history he recounted in Low Life, and the lead-off essay in this collection revisits the frame of mind he was in when he conceived that book in the Lower East Side of the early 1980s. The best essays that follow maintain that strong personal connection, such as an eyewitness account of a riot in Tompkins Square Park or the time he lived in the same apartment building as Allen Ginsberg (who 'suffered me, if not especially gladly'). The book and music reviews that make up the bulk of the remaining material are usually insightful and occasionally contain striking imagery: he describes, for example, how the punk-country band the Mekons 'built an imaginary America out of pocket lint.' But collecting disparate pieces in a single volume is a risky proposition, and sometimes an awkward skip, as in a chapter on two books by photographer Michael Lesy, temporarily exposes the anthology's patchwork nature. It's worth working through those rough patches, however, to soak up Sante's various observations on the long legacy of outsider culture, from Rimbaud through Buddy Bolden to Bob Dylan.' Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Burning passion and a prose style to die for." William Gibson

Review:

"Sante has a talent for the striking, impressionistic insight and the ability to write transcendental prose." The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"One of the handful of living masters of the American language, as well as a singular historian and philosopher of American experience." The New Yorker

Review:

"At once tough in his thinking, empathic in his analysis, and liberated in expression, Sante selects barbed details, tunes in to danger and suspense, and dispenses wry humor and sure insight." Booklist

Review:

"Whatever the topic and mood, these essays are a pleasure...deserves the broadest possible readership." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

In this collection of stylish and cogent essays, cultural historian Luc Sante offers his incomparable take on icons from Arthur Rimbaud to Allen Ginsberg, Rudolph Giuliani to Robert Mapplethorpe, New York to New Jersey, Buddy Bolden to Bob Dylan, Magritte to Tintin, along with meditations on cigarettes, the invention of the blues, hipness, New Year's Eve, and more.

Synopsis:

“Whatever the topic and mood, these essays are a pleasure . . . deserves the broadest possible readership.”—Kirkus Reviews In his books (Low Life, The Factory of Facts) and in a string of wide-ranging and inventive essays, Luc Sante has shown himself to be not only one of our pre-eminent stylists, but also a critic of uncommon power and range. Kill All Your Darlings is the first collection of his articles—many of which first appeared in the New York Review of Books and the Village Voice—and offers ample justification for this high praise. Alongside meditations on cigarettes, factory work, and hipness, and the critical tour de force, “The Invention of the Blues,” Sante offers his incomparable take on icons from Arthur Rimbaud to Bob Dylan, René Magritte to Tintin, Buddy Bolden to Walker Evans, Allen Ginsberg to Robert Mapplethorpe, demonstrating the gifts that have made him “one of the handful of living masters of the American language, as well as a singular historian and philosopher of American experience” (Peter Schjeldahl, The New Yorker).

About the Author

Luc Sante's books include Low Life: Lures and Snares of Old New York, Evidence, and The Factory of Facts. He is a frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books and has written about books, movies, art, photography, and music for many other periodicals. Sante has received a Whiting Writer's Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Literature Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and a Grammy (for album notes).

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

lukas, October 7, 2014 (view all comments by lukas)
While this sounds counter intuitive, sometimes being too intellectual can get in the way of being a good critic, especially when talking about music. It's appropriate that Greil Marcus contributes the introduction to this collection because he's a prime example of what I'm talking about. He never seems to enjoy rock and roll on the visceral level that it's meant to be enjoyed, but over-intellectualizes and conceptualizes it. You don't need references to transcendentalists to enjoy Bob Dylan. Anyway, Luc Sante, best known for "Low-Life," has something of the same problem, although he deals with art, literature, photography, and music in these pieces, as well as Tintin, who is from his native Belgium. Like Marcus, he's a Dylanologist, but has little new to say. The highlight is his chapter on the history of the blues. Interesting, if not always enlightening. The title comes from Faulkner.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9781891241536
Author:
Sante, Luc
Publisher:
Yeti Books
Subject:
Popular Culture
Subject:
Arts
Subject:
Popular Culture - General
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Sociology - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20070931
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
300
Dimensions:
8.5 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Americana » New England and Mid Atlantic
History and Social Science » Americana » New York
History and Social Science » Americana » Northeast
History and Social Science » Social Science » Essays
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
Humanities » Literary Criticism » Literary and Cultural Studies

Kill All Your Darlings: Pieces, 1990-2005 Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 300 pages Yeti Books - English 9781891241536 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "'New York City is fated always to remain my home,' writes Sante, who became permanently linked with the city through the underground history he recounted in Low Life, and the lead-off essay in this collection revisits the frame of mind he was in when he conceived that book in the Lower East Side of the early 1980s. The best essays that follow maintain that strong personal connection, such as an eyewitness account of a riot in Tompkins Square Park or the time he lived in the same apartment building as Allen Ginsberg (who 'suffered me, if not especially gladly'). The book and music reviews that make up the bulk of the remaining material are usually insightful and occasionally contain striking imagery: he describes, for example, how the punk-country band the Mekons 'built an imaginary America out of pocket lint.' But collecting disparate pieces in a single volume is a risky proposition, and sometimes an awkward skip, as in a chapter on two books by photographer Michael Lesy, temporarily exposes the anthology's patchwork nature. It's worth working through those rough patches, however, to soak up Sante's various observations on the long legacy of outsider culture, from Rimbaud through Buddy Bolden to Bob Dylan.' Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Burning passion and a prose style to die for."
"Review" by , "Sante has a talent for the striking, impressionistic insight and the ability to write transcendental prose."
"Review" by , "One of the handful of living masters of the American language, as well as a singular historian and philosopher of American experience."
"Review" by , "At once tough in his thinking, empathic in his analysis, and liberated in expression, Sante selects barbed details, tunes in to danger and suspense, and dispenses wry humor and sure insight."
"Review" by , "Whatever the topic and mood, these essays are a pleasure...deserves the broadest possible readership."
"Synopsis" by , In this collection of stylish and cogent essays, cultural historian Luc Sante offers his incomparable take on icons from Arthur Rimbaud to Allen Ginsberg, Rudolph Giuliani to Robert Mapplethorpe, New York to New Jersey, Buddy Bolden to Bob Dylan, Magritte to Tintin, along with meditations on cigarettes, the invention of the blues, hipness, New Year's Eve, and more.
"Synopsis" by ,
“Whatever the topic and mood, these essays are a pleasure . . . deserves the broadest possible readership.”—Kirkus Reviews In his books (Low Life, The Factory of Facts) and in a string of wide-ranging and inventive essays, Luc Sante has shown himself to be not only one of our pre-eminent stylists, but also a critic of uncommon power and range. Kill All Your Darlings is the first collection of his articles—many of which first appeared in the New York Review of Books and the Village Voice—and offers ample justification for this high praise. Alongside meditations on cigarettes, factory work, and hipness, and the critical tour de force, “The Invention of the Blues,” Sante offers his incomparable take on icons from Arthur Rimbaud to Bob Dylan, René Magritte to Tintin, Buddy Bolden to Walker Evans, Allen Ginsberg to Robert Mapplethorpe, demonstrating the gifts that have made him “one of the handful of living masters of the American language, as well as a singular historian and philosopher of American experience” (Peter Schjeldahl, The New Yorker).
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