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Love All the People: Letters, Lyrics, Routines

Love All the People: Letters, Lyrics, Routines Cover

 

Staff Pick

"Hicks's humor wasn't for everyone, and during his lifetime, few had a chance to hear it. Love All the People gives a talented and insightful performer a second lease on life. What is tragic about Hicks's belated renaissance is that it seems very little has changed in this country. But, as the sign at the entrance to Jonestown said (stealing a phrase from George Santayana) 'Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it.' I truly believe that somewhere on the other side, Hicks is having the last laugh."
Recommended by Gerry, Powells.com

"Hicks's humor wasn't for everyone, and during his lifetime, few had a chance to hear it. Love All the People gives a talented and insightful performer a second lease on life. What is tragic about Hicks's belated renaissance is that it seems very little has changed in this country. But, as the sign at the entrance to Jonestown said (stealing a phrase from George Santayana) 'Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it.' I truly believe that somewhere on the other side, Hicks is having the last laugh."
Recommended by Gerry, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In 1993, network executives abruptly cut the final appearance of comedian Bill Hicks — a scathing tirade of digs on the Pope and the pro-life movement — from an episode of The Late Show with David Letterman. His banning from the show, along with a profile in The New Yorker by veteran writer John Lahr, catapulted Hicks to national prominence. Just months later, at age 32, he died of pancreatic cancer. Now available for the first time are Hick's most critical and comic observations, gathered from his stand-up routines, diaries, notebooks, letters, and final writings.

This collection features his controversial humor and witheringly funny attacks on American culture, from its worship of celebrity and material goods to its involvement in the first Gulf War. Love All the People faithfully traces Hicks's evolution from a funny but conventional stand-up comedian into a fearless and brilliant iconoclast.

Review:

?[A] celebration of the short life and career of one of America?s most controversial stand-ups...Hicks casts a long shadow over modern comedy. It is hard to find a stand-up who does not admire his work.? Times of London

Review:

?Bill was right up there with Lenny Bruce and Richard Pryor. He was easily the best comic of my generation.? Brett Butler

Review:

?Bill Hicks — blowtorch, excavator, truth-sayer, and brain specialist, like a reverend waving a gun around. He will correct your vision. Others will drive on the road he built.? Tom Waits

Review:

?[A]n incredibly moving experience.? Independent on Sunday

Review:

?He was hilarious, brilliant, brave, and right about everything.? Henry Rollins

Synopsis:

This posthumous collection features Hicks's controversial humor and witheringly funny attacks on American culture, from its worship of celebrity and material goods to its involvement in the first Gulf War.

About the Author

Bill Hicks was born in Valdosta, GA, in 1961. Hicks cited his formative influences as being down to his prized typewriter on which he'd compose his own scripts, a small b/w tv (or 'Lucifer's Dream Box'), a poster of Woody Allen and a fixation with The Tonight Show. The result was a radical philosopher masquerading as a stand-up comic, plumbing the American psyche with challenging (and side-splitting) conclusions. Letterman shot Hicks to national prominence — not only because of his regular slots, but because his spectacular banning from the show following an un-aired tirade against pro-lifers and the Pope. In 1993, he died of pancreatic cancer, aged 32.

John Lahr is the Senior Drama Critic at The New Yorker. He is the author of 18 books and numerous plays.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781932360653
Subtitle:
Letters, Lyrics, Routines
Foreword:
Lahr, John
Foreword:
Lahr, John
Author:
Hicks, Bill
Publisher:
Soft Skull Press
Subject:
Form - Essays
Subject:
HUMOR / Form/Essays
Publication Date:
November 2004
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
8.96x6.04x.70 in. 1.01 lbs.

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Humor » General
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » Narrative

Love All the People: Letters, Lyrics, Routines
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 384 pages Soft Skull Press - English 9781932360653 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

"Hicks's humor wasn't for everyone, and during his lifetime, few had a chance to hear it. Love All the People gives a talented and insightful performer a second lease on life. What is tragic about Hicks's belated renaissance is that it seems very little has changed in this country. But, as the sign at the entrance to Jonestown said (stealing a phrase from George Santayana) 'Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it.' I truly believe that somewhere on the other side, Hicks is having the last laugh."

"Staff Pick" by ,

"Hicks's humor wasn't for everyone, and during his lifetime, few had a chance to hear it. Love All the People gives a talented and insightful performer a second lease on life. What is tragic about Hicks's belated renaissance is that it seems very little has changed in this country. But, as the sign at the entrance to Jonestown said (stealing a phrase from George Santayana) 'Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it.' I truly believe that somewhere on the other side, Hicks is having the last laugh."

"Review" by , ?[A] celebration of the short life and career of one of America?s most controversial stand-ups...Hicks casts a long shadow over modern comedy. It is hard to find a stand-up who does not admire his work.?
"Review" by , ?Bill was right up there with Lenny Bruce and Richard Pryor. He was easily the best comic of my generation.?
"Review" by , ?Bill Hicks — blowtorch, excavator, truth-sayer, and brain specialist, like a reverend waving a gun around. He will correct your vision. Others will drive on the road he built.?
"Review" by , ?[A]n incredibly moving experience.?
"Review" by , ?He was hilarious, brilliant, brave, and right about everything.?
"Synopsis" by , This posthumous collection features Hicks's controversial humor and witheringly funny attacks on American culture, from its worship of celebrity and material goods to its involvement in the first Gulf War.
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