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4 Remote Warehouse Military- General History

Other titles in the Modern War Studies series:

Jackson's Sword: The Army Officer Corps on the American Frontier, 1810-1821 (Modern War Studies)

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Jackson's Sword: The Army Officer Corps on the American Frontier, 1810-1821 (Modern War Studies) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Jackson's Sword is the initial volume in a monumental two-volume work that provides a sweeping panoramic view of the U.S. Army and its officer corps from the War of 1812 to the War with Mexico, the first such study in more than forty years. Watson's chronicle shows how the officer corps played a crucial role in stabilizing the frontiers of a rapidly expanding nation, while gradually moving away from military adventurism toward a professionalism subordinate to civilian authority.

Jackson's Sword explores problems of institutional instability, multiple loyalties, and insubordination as it demonstrates how the officer corps often undermined-and sometimes supplanted-civilian authority with regard to war-making and diplomacy on the frontier. Watson shows that army officers were often motivated by regionalism and sectionalism, as well as antagonism toward Indians, Spaniards, and Britons. The resulting belligerence incited them to invade Spanish Florida and Texas without authorization and to pursue military solutions to complex intercultural and international dilemmas.

Watson focuses on the years when Andrew Jackson led the Division of the South—often contrary to orders from his civilian superiors—examining his decade-long quasi-war with Spaniards and Indians along the northern border of Florida. Watson explores differences between army attitudes toward the Texas and Florida borders to explain why Spain ceded Florida but not Texas to the United States. He then examines the army's shift to the western frontier of white settlement by focusing on expeditions to advance U.S. power up the Missouri River and drive British influence from the Louisiana Purchase.

More than merely recounting campaigns and operations, Watson explores civil-military relations, officer socialization, commissioning, resignations, and assignments, and sets these in the context of social, political, economic, technological, military, and cultural changes during the early republic and the Age of Jackson. He portrays officers as identifying with frontiersmen and southern farmers and lacking respect for civilian authority and constitutional processes—but having little sympathy for civilian adventurers-and delves deeply into primary sources that reveal what they thought, wrote, and did on the frontier.

As Watson shows, the army's work in the borderlands underscored divisions within as well as between nations. Jackson's Sword captures an era on the eve of military professionalism to shed new light on the military's role in the early republic.

Review:

"Watson, an associate professor of history at the U.S. Military Academy, provides a masterly scholarly analysis of the pivotal role the U.S. military played in cementing the security of the fledging nation. Andrew Jackson and comrades-in-arms like Edmund Gaines embraced America's manifest destiny, expanding the country's reach into the Spanish territories of Florida and Texas and into the chaotic Gulf Coast and New Orleans. As commander of the Southern forces, Jackson, the 'Tennessee tornado,' employed no-holds-barred tactics, launching the first brutal Indian removals, or as Watson labels it, 'ethnic cleansing' of the Florida tribes. The army backed white settlers' incursions into Indian lands, destroyed communities of escaped slaves, and held their own against smugglers and pirates. The reluctance of politicians in Washington to interfere with the popular Jackson, combined with primitive communications technology, gave Jackson and his officers unequaled authority to act as an independent entity. Only as the country finally dispensed with its external enemies did the federal government move to professionalize the army and end the dominance that Old Hickory exerted, Watson concludes in his measured and detailed study. 43 photos, 2 maps. (Dec.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

A fascinating portrait of the U.S. Army on the early American frontier. Shows how the officer corps played a crucial role in stabilizing the frontiers of a rapidly expanding nation.

Table of Contents

Preface

Acknowledgments

Introduction: The Soldier and the Nineteenth-Century American State: Insulation, Autonomy, and Agency

1. Confidence, Belligerence, and Insubordination: Army Operations along the Texan and Maritime Frontiers of Louisiana, 1810-1814

2. The Army Asserts American Hegemony on the Florida Frontier: From the Creek War to the Destruction of the Negro Fort, 1813-1816

3. The Tensions of Aggression and Accountability: Military Expansionism in the Gulf Borderlands, 1815-1817

4. Concluding the Quasi-War with Spain: Civil-Military Tensions, the Occupation of Amelia Island, and the "First Seminole War," 1817-1818

5. Jackson and Gaines Get Their Way: Civil-Military Friction over the Invasion of Florida, Indian Relations, and Filibustering against Texas, 1817-1821

6. Assessing National Military Expansion on the Western Frontier to 1825: Political and Diplomatic Ebb and Flow in Army Operations on the Plains

7. The Growth of Professional Accountability during the 1820s and 1830s: Contexts, Policies, and Causation--Domestic and International

Conclusion. The Soldier and the Jacksonian State: The Military Academy, Army Missions, and Political Acceptance in an Age of Democratization

Appendices

Notes

Selected Bibliography

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780700618842
Author:
Watson, Samuel J.
Publisher:
University Press of Kansas
Subject:
Military-General History
Subject:
Military-US Military General
Subject:
US History-1800 to Civil War
Subject:
Military - General
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20121231
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
480

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Military » Civil War » General
History and Social Science » Military » General History
History and Social Science » Military » Strategy Tactics and Deception
History and Social Science » Military » US Military » General
History and Social Science » Military » War of 1812
History and Social Science » US History » 1800 to Civil War
History and Social Science » US History » 19th Century

Jackson's Sword: The Army Officer Corps on the American Frontier, 1810-1821 (Modern War Studies) New Hardcover
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$40.95 In Stock
Product details 480 pages University Press of Kansas - English 9780700618842 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Watson, an associate professor of history at the U.S. Military Academy, provides a masterly scholarly analysis of the pivotal role the U.S. military played in cementing the security of the fledging nation. Andrew Jackson and comrades-in-arms like Edmund Gaines embraced America's manifest destiny, expanding the country's reach into the Spanish territories of Florida and Texas and into the chaotic Gulf Coast and New Orleans. As commander of the Southern forces, Jackson, the 'Tennessee tornado,' employed no-holds-barred tactics, launching the first brutal Indian removals, or as Watson labels it, 'ethnic cleansing' of the Florida tribes. The army backed white settlers' incursions into Indian lands, destroyed communities of escaped slaves, and held their own against smugglers and pirates. The reluctance of politicians in Washington to interfere with the popular Jackson, combined with primitive communications technology, gave Jackson and his officers unequaled authority to act as an independent entity. Only as the country finally dispensed with its external enemies did the federal government move to professionalize the army and end the dominance that Old Hickory exerted, Watson concludes in his measured and detailed study. 43 photos, 2 maps. (Dec.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , A fascinating portrait of the U.S. Army on the early American frontier. Shows how the officer corps played a crucial role in stabilizing the frontiers of a rapidly expanding nation.
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