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Original Essays | September 18, 2014

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On a hot July evening years ago, my Toyota Tercel overheated on a flat stretch of highway north of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. A steam geyser shot up from... Continue »
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After Custer: Loss and Transformation in Sioux Country

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After Custer: Loss and Transformation in Sioux Country Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Between 1876 and 1877, the U.S. Army battled Lakota Sioux and Northern Cheyenne Indians in a series of vicious conflicts known today as the Great Sioux War. After the defeat of Custer at the Little Big Horn in June 1876, the army responded to its stunning loss by pouring fresh troops and resources into the war effort. In the end, the U.S. Army prevailed, but at a significant cost. In this unique contribution to American western history, Paul L. Hedren examines the war’s effects on the culture, environment, and geography of the northern Great Plains, their Native inhabitants, and the Anglo-American invaders.

As Hedren explains, U.S. military control of the northern plains following the Great Sioux War permitted the Northern Pacific Railroad to extend westward from the Missouri River. The new transcontinental line brought hide hunters who targeted the great northern buffalo herds and ultimately destroyed them. A de-buffaloed prairie lured cattlemen, who in turn spawned their own culture. Through forced surrender

of their lands and lifeways, Lakotas and Northern Cheyennes now experienced even more stress and calamity than they had endured during the war itself. The victors, meanwhile, faced a different set of challenges, among them providing security for the railroad crews, hide hunters, and cattlemen.

Hedren is the first scholar to examine the events of 1876–77 and their aftermath as a whole, taking into account relationships among military leaders, the building of forts, and the army’s efforts to memorialize the war and its victims. Woven into his narrative are the voices of those who witnessed such events as the burial of Custer, the laying of railroad track, or the sudden surround of a buffalo herd. Their personal testimonies lend both vibrancy and pathos to this story of irreversible change in Sioux Country.

Book News Annotation:

Little is written about the events that ensued after Custer's last stand at the Battle of Little Big Horn, and its effect on the Native Sioux and the US Army's eventual sucess. Historian Hedren brings light to the cost of winning a battle, but losing on a much grander scale. From the slaughtering of the buffalo to forcing the Lakota Sioux and Northern Cheyenne off the land, the loss of a way of life and the ensuing generation's attempt at coping are presented and investigated in this account. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Between 1876 and 1877, the U.S. Army battled Lakota Sioux and Northern Cheyenne Indians in a series of vicious conflicts known today as the Great Sioux War. After the defeat of Custer at the Little Big Horn in June 1876, the army responded to its stunning loss by pouring fresh troops and resources into the war effort. In the end, the U.S. Army prevailed, but at a significant cost. In this unique contribution to American western history, Paul L. Hedren examines the war’s effects on the culture, environment, and geography of the northern Great Plains, their Native inhabitants, and the Anglo-American invaders.

About the Author

Paul L. Hedren is a retired National Park Service superintendent residing in Omaha, Nebraska. He is the author of Fort Laramie and the Great Sioux War and, most recently, We Trailed the Sioux: Enlisted Men Speak on Custer, Crook, and the Great Sioux War.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780806142166
Author:
Hedren, Paul L.
Publisher:
University of Oklahoma Press
Author:
Hedren, Paul L.
Subject:
Military - United States
Subject:
Lakota Sioux
Subject:
Northern Cheyenne
Subject:
Great Sioux War
Subject:
Americana-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20111031
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
2 maps
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Americana » Custer
History and Social Science » Americana » General
History and Social Science » Military » US Military » General
History and Social Science » Native American » General Native American Studies
History and Social Science » US History » 19th Century

After Custer: Loss and Transformation in Sioux Country New Hardcover
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Product details 272 pages University of Oklahoma Press - English 9780806142166 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Between 1876 and 1877, the U.S. Army battled Lakota Sioux and Northern Cheyenne Indians in a series of vicious conflicts known today as the Great Sioux War. After the defeat of Custer at the Little Big Horn in June 1876, the army responded to its stunning loss by pouring fresh troops and resources into the war effort. In the end, the U.S. Army prevailed, but at a significant cost. In this unique contribution to American western history, Paul L. Hedren examines the war’s effects on the culture, environment, and geography of the northern Great Plains, their Native inhabitants, and the Anglo-American invaders.
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