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4 Remote Warehouse Environmental Studies- Environment
1 Remote Warehouse Nature Studies- General

The Man Who Saved the Whooping Crane: The Robert Porter Allen Story

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The Man Who Saved the Whooping Crane: The Robert Porter Allen Story Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Millions of people know a little bit about efforts to save the whooping crane, thanks to the movie Fly Away Home and annual news stories about ultralight planes leading migratory flocks. But few realize that in the spring of 1941, the population of these magnificent birds—pure white with black wingtips, standing five feet tall with a seven-foot wingspan—had reached an all-time low of fifteen. Written off as a species destined for extinction, the whooping crane has made an incredible and unlikely comeback.

This recovery would have been impossible if not for the efforts of Robert Porter Allen, an ornithologist with the National Audubon Society. Allen’s courageous nine-year crusade to find the last remaining whooping crane nesting site garnered nationwide media coverage. His search and his impassioned lectures about overdevelopment, habitat loss, and unregulated hunting triggered a media blitz that led to thousands of citizens helping to track the birds during their migratory trips.

In the decades since Allen and his team first searched for the whooping crane nesting site, the population has slowly increased. Dozens of organizations now see to their protection, and hundreds of scientists and volunteers help raise their young, document their numbers, lobby for funds, and devote innumerable hours to the white bird’s continued survival. Today, whooping cranes number close to 400 in the wild. While not as large a number as might be wished, biologists and ornithologists are encouraged by the increase.

During his quest to save diminishing bird populations, Allen lived weeks at a time in a tent, running tests in a makeshift laboratory, cooking over a wood fire, and fighting off annoying creatures raiding his camp. He rode out a hurricane on a boat powered only by one tattered sail, survived life-threatening illnesses and a vicious stray dog attack, endured extreme heat and cold, storms, mosquitoes, bloodsucking black flies, deadly stints of dehydration, and the start of the Cuban revolution. While searching the Canadian wilderness for the nesting site of the elusive whooping crane, he became lost for weeks after his only connection to the outside world, his radio, malfunctioned.

            Allen’s tireless efforts changed the course of U.S. environmental history and helped lead to the passage of the Endangered Species Act in 1973. Though few people remember him today, his amazing life reads like an Indiana Jones story, full of danger and adventure, failure and success.

 

Kathleen Kaska is the author of several books including the novel Murder at the Arlington.

Synopsis:

Millions of people know a little bit about efforts to save the whooping crane, thanks to the movie Fly Away Home and annual news stories about ultralight planes leading migratory flocks. But few realize that in the spring of 1941, the population of these magnificent birds—pure white with black wingtips, standing five feet tall with a seven-foot wingspan—had reached an all-time low of fifteen. Written off as a species destined for extinction, the whooping crane has made a slow but unbelievable comeback over the last seven decades.

          This recovery would have been impossible if not for the efforts of Robert Porter Allen, an ornithologist with the National Audubon Society, whose courageous eight-year crusade to find the only remaining whooping crane nesting site in North America garnered nationwide media coverage. His search and his impassioned lectures about overdevelopment, habitat loss, and unregulated hunting triggered a media blitz that had thousands of citizens on the lookout for the birds during their migratory trips.

          Allen’s tireless efforts changed the course of U.S. environmental history and helped lead to the passage of the Endangered Species Act in 1973. Though few people remember him today, his life reads like an Indiana Jones story, full of danger and adventure, failure and success. His amazing story deserves to be told.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780813040240
Author:
Kaska, Kathleen
Publisher:
University Press of Florida
Subject:
Environmental Studies-Environment
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20120931
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Map, 2 figures, 19 photos
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Science and Mathematics » Biology » Zoology » General
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » Birds » Birdwatching
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » Birds » General
Science and Mathematics » Ornithology » Endangered
Science and Mathematics » Ornithology » General Ornithology and Birding

The Man Who Saved the Whooping Crane: The Robert Porter Allen Story New Hardcover
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Product details 224 pages University Press of Florida - English 9780813040240 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

Millions of people know a little bit about efforts to save the whooping crane, thanks to the movie Fly Away Home and annual news stories about ultralight planes leading migratory flocks. But few realize that in the spring of 1941, the population of these magnificent birds—pure white with black wingtips, standing five feet tall with a seven-foot wingspan—had reached an all-time low of fifteen. Written off as a species destined for extinction, the whooping crane has made a slow but unbelievable comeback over the last seven decades.

          This recovery would have been impossible if not for the efforts of Robert Porter Allen, an ornithologist with the National Audubon Society, whose courageous eight-year crusade to find the only remaining whooping crane nesting site in North America garnered nationwide media coverage. His search and his impassioned lectures about overdevelopment, habitat loss, and unregulated hunting triggered a media blitz that had thousands of citizens on the lookout for the birds during their migratory trips.

          Allen’s tireless efforts changed the course of U.S. environmental history and helped lead to the passage of the Endangered Species Act in 1973. Though few people remember him today, his life reads like an Indiana Jones story, full of danger and adventure, failure and success. His amazing story deserves to be told.

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