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2 Burnside Religion Eastern- Zen Buddhism
6 Local Warehouse Religion Eastern- Buddhism
11 Remote Warehouse Religion Eastern- Buddhism

This title in other editions

Nothing Special: Living Zen

by

Nothing Special: Living Zen Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Chapter OneStruggle

Whirlpools and Stagnant Waters

We are rather like whirlpools in the river of life. In flowing forward, a river or stream may hit rocks, branches, or irregularities in the ground, causing whirlpools to spring up spontaneously here and there. Water entering one whirlpool quickly passes through and rejoins the river, eventually joining another whirlpool and moving on. Though for short periods it seems to be distinguishable as a separate event, the water in the whirlpools is just the river itself. The stability of a whirlpool is only temporary. The energy of the river of life forms living things — a human being, a cat or dog, trees and plants — then what held the whirlpool in place is itself altered, and the whirlpool is swept away, reentering the larger flow. The energy that was a particular whirlpool fades out and the water passes on, perhaps to be caught again and turned for a moment into another whirlpool.

We'd rather not think of our lives in this way, however. We don't want to see ourselves as simply a temporary formation, a whirlpool in the river of life. The fact is, we take form for a while; then when conditions are appropriate, we fade out. There's nothing wrong with fading out; it's a natural part of the process. However, we want to think that this little whirlpool that we are isn't part of the stream. We want to see ourselves as permanent and stable. Our whole energy goes into trying to protect our supposed separateness. To protect the separateness, we set up artificial, fixed boundaries; as a consequence, we accumulate excess baggage, stuff that slips into our whirlpool and can't flow out again. So things clog up our whirlpool and the process getsmessy. The stream needs to flow naturally and freely. If our particular whirlpool is all bogged down, we also impair the energy of the stream itself. It can't go anywhere. Neighboring whirlpools may get less water because of our frantic holding on. What we can best do for ourselves and for life is to keep the water in our whirlpool rushing and clear so that it is just flowing in and flowing out. When it gets all clogged up, we create troubles — mental, physical, spiritual.

We serve other whirlpools best if the water that enters ours is free to rush through and move on easily and quickly to whatever else needs to be stirred. The energy of life seeks rapid transformation. If we can see life this way and not cling to anything, life simply comes and goes. When debris flows into our little whirlpool, if the flow is even and strong, the debris rushes around for a while and then goes on its way. Yet that's not how we live our lives. Not seeing that we are simply a whirlpool in the river of the universe, we view ourselves as separate entities, needing to protect our boundaries. The very judgment "I feel hurt" establishes a boundary, by naming an "I" that demands to be protected. Whenever trash floats into our whirlpool, we make great efforts to avoid it, to expel it, or to somehow control it.

Ninety percent of a typical human life is spent trying to put boundaries around the whirlpool. We're constantly on guard: "He might hurt me." "This might go wrong." "I don't like him anyway." This is a complete misuse of our life function; yet we all do it to some degree.

Financial worries reflect our struggle to maintain fixed boundaries. "What if my investment doesn't work out? I might lose all ofmy money." We don't want anything to threaten our money supply. We all think that would be a terrible thing. By being protective and anxious, clinging to our assets, we clog up our lives. Water that should be rushing in and out, so it can serve, becomes stagnant. A whirlpool that puts up a dam around itself and shuts itself off from the river becomes stagnant and loses its vitality. Practice is about no longer being caught in the particular, and instead seeing it for what it is — a part of the whole. Yet we spend most of our energies creating stagnant water. That's what living in fear will do. The fear exists because the whirlpool doesn't understand what it is-none other than the stream itself. Until we get an inkling of that truth, all of our energies go in the wrong direction. We create many stagnant pools, which breed contamination and disease. Pools seeking to dam themselves for protection begin to contend with one another. "You're smelly. I don't like you." Stagnant pools cause a lot of trouble. The freshness of life is gone.

Zen practice helps us to see how we have created stagnation in our lives. "Have I always been so angry, and just never noticed it?" So our first discovery in practice is to recognize our own stagnation, created by our self-centered thoughts. The biggest problems are created by attitudes we cannot see in ourselves. Unacknowledged depression, fear, and anger create rigidity. When we recognize the rigidity and stagnation, the water begins to flow again, bit by bit. So the most vital part of practice is to be willing to be life itself — which is simply the incoming sensations — that which creates our whirlpool.

Over the years, we have trained ourselves todo the opposite: to create stagnant pools. This is our false accomplishment. Out of this ongoing effort come all of our troubles and our separation from life. We don't know how to be intimate, to be the stream of life. A stagnant whirlpool with defended boundaries isn't close to anything. Caught in a self-centered dream, we suffer, as one of our daily Zen Center vows states. Practice is the slow reversal of that. With most students, this reversal is the work of a lifetime. The change is often painful, especially at first. When we are used to the rigidity and controlled stiffness of a defended life, we don't want to allow fresh currents into awareness, however refreshing they may truly be.

Synopsis:

WHEN NOTHING IS SPECIAL, EVERYTHING CAN BE

The best-selling author of 'Everyday Zen' shows how to awaken to daily life and discover the ideal in the everyday, finding riches in our feelings, relationships, and work. 'Nothing Special' offers the r

Synopsis:

Filled with hundreds of specific examples and organized into a coherent framework of practical concepts that can be applied by managers and entrepreneurs at all levels, Built to Last provides a master blueprint for building organizations that will prosper in the 21st century and beyond. In Good to Great, the most widely anticipated management book of the year, Jim Collins presents nothing less than a recipe book on how to make a good company great. Following the success of his international blockbuster Built to Last, where he and co-author Jerry Porras discovered the secrets of companies that were outstanding at their founding and then sustained greatness, Collins wondered what could be done for the company that is good or mediocre at best? He questioned whether there have been companies that started weak and finished strong, and if so, what can be said about these companies that might help managers turn a mediocre organization into a great one? So Collins and his research team undertook a massive five year study of every company that has made the Fortune 500 since the advent of that listing in 1965, and has crafted a book as practical and insightful as BUILT TO LAST. This exclusive deluxe box set brings together the two most important business books of the last decade from Jim Collins, the leader in modern business theory.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 275-277).

About the Author

Charlotte Joko Beck, who passed away in 2011, was the founder and former head teacher at the Zen Center in San Diego.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780062511171
With:
Smith, Steve
Author:
Smith, Steve
Author:
Beck, Charlotte Joko
Author:
by Charlotte J. Beck
Author:
Smith, Steven A.
Author:
Beck, Charlotte J.
Author:
Joko Beck, Charlotte
Publisher:
HarperOne
Location:
San Francisco, Calif. :
Subject:
Comparative Religion
Subject:
Religion
Subject:
Buddhism
Subject:
Zen buddhism
Subject:
Inspirational and devotional works
Subject:
Religious life
Subject:
Religious life -- Zen Buddhism.
Subject:
Buddhism - General
Subject:
Religion Eastern-Buddhism
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade PB
Series Volume:
94-37
Publication Date:
19940903
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.02x5.38x.73 in. .49 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » General
Religion » Comparative Religion » General
Religion » Eastern Religions » Buddhism » General
Religion » Eastern Religions » Buddhism » Zen Buddhism

Nothing Special: Living Zen New Trade Paper
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$14.99 In Stock
Product details 288 pages HarperSanFrancisco - English 9780062511171 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , WHEN NOTHING IS SPECIAL, EVERYTHING CAN BE

The best-selling author of 'Everyday Zen' shows how to awaken to daily life and discover the ideal in the everyday, finding riches in our feelings, relationships, and work. 'Nothing Special' offers the r

"Synopsis" by , Filled with hundreds of specific examples and organized into a coherent framework of practical concepts that can be applied by managers and entrepreneurs at all levels, Built to Last provides a master blueprint for building organizations that will prosper in the 21st century and beyond. In Good to Great, the most widely anticipated management book of the year, Jim Collins presents nothing less than a recipe book on how to make a good company great. Following the success of his international blockbuster Built to Last, where he and co-author Jerry Porras discovered the secrets of companies that were outstanding at their founding and then sustained greatness, Collins wondered what could be done for the company that is good or mediocre at best? He questioned whether there have been companies that started weak and finished strong, and if so, what can be said about these companies that might help managers turn a mediocre organization into a great one? So Collins and his research team undertook a massive five year study of every company that has made the Fortune 500 since the advent of that listing in 1965, and has crafted a book as practical and insightful as BUILT TO LAST. This exclusive deluxe box set brings together the two most important business books of the last decade from Jim Collins, the leader in modern business theory.
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