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This title in other editions

The Ubiquitous Siva: Somananda's Sivadrsti and His Tantric Interlocutors (AAR Religion in Translation)

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

John Nemec examines the beginnings of the non-dual tantric philosophy of the famed Pratyabhijña or "Recognition [of God]" School of tenth-century Kashmir, the tradition most closely associated with Kashmiri Shaivism. In doing so it offers, for the very first time, a critical edition and annotated translation of a large portion of the first Pratyabhijña text ever composed, the Sivadrsti of Somananda. In an extended introduction, Nemec argues that the author presents a unique form of non-dualism, a strict pantheism that declares all beings and entities found in the universe to be fully identical with the active and willful god Siva. This view stands in contrast to the philosophically more flexible panentheism of both his disciple and commentator, Utpaladeva, and the very few other Saiva tantric works that were extant in the author's day. Nemec also argues that the text was written for the author's fellow tantric initiates, not for a wider audience. This can be adduced from the structure of the work, the opponents the author addresses, and various other editorial strategies. Even the author's famous and vociferous arguments against the non-tantric Hindu grammarians may be shown to have been ultimately directed at an opposing Hindu tantric school that subscribed to many of the grammarians' philosophical views. Included in the volume is a critical edition and annotated translation of the first three (of seven) chapters of the text, along with the corresponding chapters of the commentary. These are the chapters in which Somananda formulates his arguments against opposing tantric authors and schools of thought. None of the materials made available in the present volume has ever been translated into English, apart from a brief rendering of the first chapter that was published without the commentary in 1957. None of the commentary has previously been translated into any language at all.

About the Author

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, University of Virginia

Table of Contents

I. Introduction to the Translation.

1. Introduction

2. About this book

Somananda's Works and His Biography

3. The Author and His Works

4. Somananda's Biography and Autobiography

The Author's Thought and the Intellectual History of the Pratyabhijña

5. Somananda's Settled Opinion (siddhanta)

6. Divergences Between the Writings of Somananda and Utpaladeva

7. The Use of Trika and Technical Terminology in the Sivadrsti

8. The Influence of the Trika VBh on the Sivadrsti

Somananda's Tantric Interlocutors, and the Philosophy of the Grammarians

9. The Tantric Post-Scriptural Schools and Authors Known to Somananda

10. The Sivadrsti and the Spanda School

11. Krama Influences on the Sivadrsti

12. Somananda and the Saiva Siddhanta

13. The Sivadrsti and the Philosophy of the Grammarians

14. Bhatta Pradyumna and his Tattvagabhastotra

15. Conclusions: Somananda's Sivadrsti and the Emergence of the Pratyabhijña

About the Edition and the Translation

16. The Manuscripts of the Sivadrsti

17. About the Edition

18. About the Translation

Abbreviations

II. The Translation.

Chapter One of the Sivadrsti and Sivadrsativrtti: Siva and His Powers

Chapter Two of the Sivadrsti and Sivadrsativrtti: The Arguments Against the Grammarians

Chapter Three of the Sivadrsti and Sivadrsativrtti: The Arguments Against the Saktas

III. The Edition.

Critical Edition of Chapter One of the Sivadrsti and Sivadrsativrtti

Critical Edition of Chapter Two of the Sivadrsti and Sivadrsativrtti

Critical Edition of Chapter Three of the Sivadrsti and Sivadrsativrtti

Bibliography

Product Details

ISBN:
9780199795468
Author:
Nemec, John
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Author:
John Nemec
Subject:
Hinduism
Subject:
Religion
Subject:
Theology | Hinduism
Subject:
Religion & Theology | Hinduism
Subject:
Religion Eastern-Hinduism-General
Publication Date:
20110731
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
456
Dimensions:
6.1 x 9.2 x 1 in 1.419 lb

Related Subjects

Humanities » Philosophy » General
Religion » Comparative Religion » General
Religion » Eastern Religions » Hinduism » General
Religion » Eastern Religions » Shiva and Shivaism

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