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Canterbury Cathedral Priory in the Age of Becket

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Canterbury Cathedral Priory in the Age of Becket Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

This fascinating book recounts the extensive building program that took place at Canterbury Cathedral Priory, England, from 1153 to 1167, during the time when Thomas Becket served as Royal Chancellor and then as archbishop of Canterbury. Masterminded by Prior Wibert, the renewal included the physical expansion of the cathedral's precinct, the construction of new buildings, and the installation of a pioneering pressurized water system. This ambitious undertaking utilized a Late Romanesque style, lavish materials, and sculpture, and drew on the optimism and creative energy of the young Angevin rulers of England, Henry II and his queen, Eleanor of Aquitaine.and#160;

Canterbury Cathedral Priory in the Age of Becket reassesses the surviving remains and relates them to important changes in Benedictine monasticism concerned with hospitality, hygiene, the administration of law, liturgy, and the care of the sick. It also restores to history a neglected major patron of unusual breadth and accomplishments. Peter Fergusson sheds fresh light on the social and cultural history of the mid-12th century.

Synopsis:

This fascinating book offers a new understanding of Englands earliest Gothic buildings and art, placing them against a background of the religious and ethical ideals of the individuals and communities who sponsored them. 


Synopsis:

This is the first book devoted to churches in Ireland dating from the arrival of Christianity in the fifth century to the early stages of the Romanesque around 1100, including those built to house treasures of the golden age of Irish art, such as the Book of Kells and the Ardagh chalice. Ó Carragáin's comprehensive survey of the surviving examples forms the basis for a far-reaching analysis of why these buildings looked as they did, and what they meant in the context of early Irish society. Ó Carragáin also identifies a clear political and ideological context for the first Romanesque churches in Ireland and shows that, to a considerable extent, the Irish Romanesque represents the perpetuation of a long-established architectural tradition.

Synopsis:

In this original account of architecture in England between c.1150 and c.1250, Peter Draper explores how the assimilation of new ideas from France led to an English version of Gothic architecture that was quite distinct from Gothic expression elsewhere. The author considers the great cathedrals of England (Canterbury, Wells, Salisbury, Lincoln, Ely, York, Durham, and others) as well as parish churches and secular buildings, to examine the complex interrelations between architecture and its social and political functions. Architecture was an expression of identity, Draper finds, and the unique Gothic that developed in England was one of a number of manifestations of an emerging sense of national identity.

The book inquires into such topics as the role of patrons, the relationships between patrons and architects, and the wide variety of factors that contributed to the process of creating a building. With 250 illustrations, including more than 50 in color, this book offers new ways of seeing and thinking about some of Englands greatest and best-loved architecture.

About the Author

Paul Binski is reader in the history of medieval art at the University of Cambridge.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780300175691
Author:
Fergusson, Peter
Publisher:
Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art
Author:
Draper, Peter
Author:
Platt, Colin
Author:
Radding, Charles M.
Author:
O. Carragain, Tomas
Author:
Schofield, John
Author:
Binski, Paul
Author:
Carragain, Tomas O.
Author:
McClendon, Charles
Author:
Harrison, Stuart
Author:
Quiney, Anthony
Author:
Clark, William
Subject:
General Art
Subject:
History
Subject:
Great britain
Subject:
Criticism
Subject:
General History
Subject:
General Architecture
Subject:
Religious buildings
Subject:
General-General
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Series:
The Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art
Publication Date:
20111131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
126 b/w illus.
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
11 x 8.5 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » Buildings » Landmarks and Monuments
Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » General
Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » History » Medieval
History and Social Science » Economics » General
History and Social Science » Europe » Great Britain » General History
History and Social Science » World History » England » General
History and Social Science » World History » General
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » General

Canterbury Cathedral Priory in the Age of Becket New Hardcover
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Product details 288 pages Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art - English 9780300175691 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

This fascinating book offers a new understanding of Englands earliest Gothic buildings and art, placing them against a background of the religious and ethical ideals of the individuals and communities who sponsored them. 


"Synopsis" by ,
This is the first book devoted to churches in Ireland dating from the arrival of Christianity in the fifth century to the early stages of the Romanesque around 1100, including those built to house treasures of the golden age of Irish art, such as the Book of Kells and the Ardagh chalice. Ó Carragáin's comprehensive survey of the surviving examples forms the basis for a far-reaching analysis of why these buildings looked as they did, and what they meant in the context of early Irish society. Ó Carragáin also identifies a clear political and ideological context for the first Romanesque churches in Ireland and shows that, to a considerable extent, the Irish Romanesque represents the perpetuation of a long-established architectural tradition.
"Synopsis" by ,
In this original account of architecture in England between c.1150 and c.1250, Peter Draper explores how the assimilation of new ideas from France led to an English version of Gothic architecture that was quite distinct from Gothic expression elsewhere. The author considers the great cathedrals of England (Canterbury, Wells, Salisbury, Lincoln, Ely, York, Durham, and others) as well as parish churches and secular buildings, to examine the complex interrelations between architecture and its social and political functions. Architecture was an expression of identity, Draper finds, and the unique Gothic that developed in England was one of a number of manifestations of an emerging sense of national identity.

The book inquires into such topics as the role of patrons, the relationships between patrons and architects, and the wide variety of factors that contributed to the process of creating a building. With 250 illustrations, including more than 50 in color, this book offers new ways of seeing and thinking about some of Englands greatest and best-loved architecture.

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