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The Death of Adam: Essays on Modern Thought

The Death of Adam: Essays on Modern Thought Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In this award-winning collection, the bestselling author of Gilead offers us other ways of thinking about history, religion, and society. Whether rescuing "Calvinism" and its creator Jean Cauvin from the repressive "puritan" stereotype, or considering how the McGuffey readers were inspired by Midwestern abolitionists, or the divide between the Bible and Darwinism, Marilynne Robinson repeatedly sends her reader back to the primary texts that are central to the development of American culture but little read or acknowledged today.

A passionate and provocative celebration of ideas, the old arts of civilization, and life's mystery, The Death of Adam is, in the words of Robert D. Richardson, Jr., "a grand, sweeping, blazing, brilliant, life-changing book."

Marilynne Robinson is the author of the novels Gilead—winner of the Pulitzer Prize—Housekeeping, and Home and two books of nonfiction, Mother Country and The Death of Adam. She teaches at the University of Iowa Writers Workshop.
"American culture is enriched by having the whole range of Marilynne Robinson's work," declared The Boston Globe. In this collection of essays, the bestselling author of Gilead offers other ways of thinking about history, religion, and society. Whether rescuing "Calvinism" and its creator Jean Calvin from the repressive puritan stereotype, or considering how the McGuffey readers were inspired by Midwestern abolitionists, or the divide between the Bible and Darwinism, Marilynne Robinson repeatedly sends her reader back to the primary texts that are central to the development of American culture but little read or acknowledged today.
"One of Robinson's great merits as an essayist is her refusal to take her opinions secondhand. Her book is a goad to renewed curiosity."—The New York Times Book Review
"One of Robinson's great merits as an essayist is her refusal to take her opinions secondhand. Her book is a goad to renewed curiosity."—The New York Times Book Review
 
"American culture is enriched by having the whole range of Marilynne Robinson's work"—Jane Vanderburgh, The Boston Globe

"A valuable contribution to American life and letters."—Kathleen Norris

"A useful antidote to the increasingly crude and slogan-loving culture we inhabit."—Doris Lessing

"This is a grand, sweeping, blazing, brilliant, life-changing book."—Robert D. Richardson, Jr.

 
"Robinson's thinking is all in the service of humanity's survival, spiritually and environmentally."—Charles Baxter
 
"As with all good philosophical essays, these pieces do more than shape thinking. They're about life as it's lived now. Like the 19th-century reformers she so appreciates in 'McGuffey and the Abolitionists,' the author wants to engender good faith. When what passes for social criticism these days is issue-bound journalism, and when intellectual debate is largely confined to ivy halls, Robinson's laboriously researched, inclusively presented opinions are welcome. They serve scholarship well, enlarging the audience for dialogue on broad questions of how to live. Her dogged textual dissections (e.g., of Lord Acton and other critics of Calvin) illuminate her readings; her epigrammatic observations (e.g., 'spiritual agoraphobes') vividly capture our states of mind . . . This is a book written in hope."—Kirkus Reviews
 
"[Marilynne Robinson's] moral integrity is accompanied by an equally rigorous intellectual integrity, and rather than accepting received wisdom she hunts it out for herself among original texts. In the process, she revives founding beliefs as a possible solution for current ills."—Publishers Weekly

Review:

"The author of the widely read novel, Housekeeping, has gathered a number of dove-tailing essays on what she calls 'modern thought.' Hers is a fierce, biting polemic against some of the principal figures of such thought, especially Nietzsche and Freud, whose influences have been especially harmful, she believes, to our civilization. She is deeply troubled by the fact that a shallow nostalgia has replaced history. For Ms. Robinson 'civilization is the ecology being lost.' Her view is grim, but justifiably so, and her lucid, forceful position must be seriously considered." Reviewed by Lou Tanner, Virginia Quarterly Review (Copyright 2006 Virginia Quarterly Review)

Synopsis:

In this award-winning collection, the bestselling author of Gilead offers us other ways of thinking about history, religion, and society. Whether rescuing Calvinism and its creator Jean Cauvin from the repressive puritan stereotype, or considering how the McGuffey readers were inspired by Midwestern abolitionists, or the divide between the Bible and Darwinism, Marilynne Robinson repeatedly sends her reader back to the primary texts that are central to the development of American culture but little read or acknowledged today.

A passionate and provocative celebration of ideas, the old arts of civilization, and life's mystery, The Death of Adam is, in the words of Robert D. Richardson, Jr., a grand, sweeping, blazing, brilliant, life-changing book.

Synopsis:

In these ten essays, Robinson brilliantly addresses subjects that have become the territory of specialists--religion, history, the state of society. The writing is "contrarian in method and spirit," according to the author.

About the Author

Marilynne Robinson is the author of the modern classic Housekeeping--winner of the PEN/Hemingway Award--and two books of nonfiction, Mother Country (FSG, 1989) and The Death of Adam. She teaches at the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop.

Table of Contents

Introduction

Dawinism

Facing Reality

Family

Dietrich Bonhoeffer

McGuffey and the Abolitionists

Puritans and Prigs

Margueritte de Navarre

Psalm Eight

Wilderness

Product Details

ISBN:
9780312425326
Publisher:
Picador USA
Subject:
Philosophy
Author:
Robinson, Marilynne
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
History
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
United States Civilization.
Subject:
United States Civilization 1945-
Subject:
US History - 20th Century
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20051131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
280
Dimensions:
8.38 x 5.47 x 0.745 in

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Related Subjects

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» Fiction and Poetry » Anthologies » Essays
» Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
» History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
» Humanities » Literary Criticism » General
» Humanities » Literary Criticism » Literary and Cultural Studies
» Humanities » Philosophy » General

The Death of Adam: Essays on Modern Thought
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Product details 280 pages Picador USA - English 9780312425326 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In this award-winning collection, the bestselling author of Gilead offers us other ways of thinking about history, religion, and society. Whether rescuing Calvinism and its creator Jean Cauvin from the repressive puritan stereotype, or considering how the McGuffey readers were inspired by Midwestern abolitionists, or the divide between the Bible and Darwinism, Marilynne Robinson repeatedly sends her reader back to the primary texts that are central to the development of American culture but little read or acknowledged today.

A passionate and provocative celebration of ideas, the old arts of civilization, and life's mystery, The Death of Adam is, in the words of Robert D. Richardson, Jr., a grand, sweeping, blazing, brilliant, life-changing book.

"Synopsis" by , In these ten essays, Robinson brilliantly addresses subjects that have become the territory of specialists--religion, history, the state of society. The writing is "contrarian in method and spirit," according to the author.
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