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Designing for Interaction: Creating Smart Applications and Clever Devices

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Designing for Interaction: Creating Smart Applications and Clever Devices Cover

ISBN13: 9780321432063
ISBN10: 0321432061
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Explore the new design discipline that is behind such products as the iPod and innovative Web sites like Flicer. While other books on this subject are either aimed at more seasoned practitioners or else are too focused on a particular medium like software, this guide will take a more holistic approach to the discipline, looking at interaction design for the Web, software, and devices. It is the only interaction design book that is coming from a designers point of view rather than that of an engineer.

This much-needed guide is more than just a how-to manual. It covers interaction design fundamentals, approaches to designing, design research, and more, and spans all mediums — Internet, software, and devices. Even robots Filled with tips, real-world projects, and interviews, you'll get a solid grounding in everything you need to successfully tackle interaction design.

Book News Annotation:

An armband on a jogger gathers more than just sweat; it also records physiological data to download. A robot receptionist not only answers the phone but also gossips. These are not the stuff of dreams. They are on the market or near to it right now. Practitioner (on many levels) Saffer describes how to design products that are just as innovative, practical and human-centered, starting with definitions and the history of this new field, then shifting to defining the product, choosing an approach, using the elements of interactive design (motion, space, time, appearance, texture, sound) and their laws, characteristics of good design, design research and brainstorming, the craft end (task flows, storyboards, etc.), interface design basics, developing smart applications and clever devices, and designing for service. He closes with a peek into the future and a section on design ethics.
Annotation 2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Book News Annotation:

An armband on a jogger gathers more than just sweat; it also records physiological data to download. A robot receptionist not only answers the phone but also gossips. These are not the stuff of dreams. They are on the market or near to it right now. Practitioner (on many levels) Saffer describes how to design products that are just as innovative, practical and human-centered, starting with definitions and the history of this new field, then shifting to defining the product, choosing an approach, using the elements of interactive design (motion, space, time, appearance, texture, sound) and their laws, characteristics of good design, design research and brainstorming, the craft end (task flows, storyboards, etc.), interface design basics, developing smart applications and clever devices, and designing for service. He closes with a peek into the future and a section on design ethics. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Designing for Interaction is an introduction to the practice of interaction design, the design discipline behind such products as the iPhone and other touchscreen devices and innovative Web sites like Flickr. Aimed at new practitioners and students--as well as user experience professionals and developers--it is a comprehensive look at the discipline, from current methods to its future. This guide takes a holistic approach looking at interaction design for the Web, software, and devices. This new edition adds information on design strategy, extended research analysis, conceptual models, brainstorming, and user testing and development.

More than just a how-to manual, this is the only book on the subject coming from a design rather that computer science background. Filled with tips, real-world projects, and interviews of leading practitioners such as Marc Rettig, Brenda Laurel and Hugh Dubberly, you'll get a solid grounding in everything you need to successfully tackle interaction design.

About the Author

Dan Saffer has worked for the last decade in the digital medium as a webmaster, producer, developer, copywriter, creative lead, information architect, and interaction designer. He is currently a senior interaction designer at Adaptive Path, a leading design consultancy and has designed and built Web sites, devices, and applications for companies as diverse as Tiffany & Co and the World Wrestling Federation. His work has been featured in New York magazine, Entertainment Weekly, and the Chicago Tribune. His Web site and blog can be found at www.odannyboy.com. Dan is a member of the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) and the Industrial Designers Society of America (IDSA) and received his Master of Design in Interaction Design from Carnegie Mellon University, where he also taught interaction design.

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leofrish, August 15, 2006 (view all comments by leofrish)
In designing for interaction Creating Smart Applications and Clever Devices, Dan Saffer offers a broad overview of the many issues facing the Interaction Designer (IxD) today, ranging from a definition of the practice, through specific activities expected of an IxD, to musing on IxD?s future. This brief and tightly written book contributes to the international dialog about this rapidly evolving design discipline.
Saffer is well qualified to author this book: both his academic and professional backgrounds have provided a solid foundation in the art of design along with his leadership on the IxDA (the Interaction Design Association, an emerging professional organization chartered to promote this recent form of design).
Throughout the book, Saffer offers us bold position statements about IxD.
Consider his heroic attempt to put a definition on interaction design:
?[interaction designers] should never forget that the goal is to facilitate interactions between humans.?
and
?But interaction design isn?t about interaction with computers (that?s the discipline of human?computer interaction) or interaction with machines (that?s industrial design).?
These are enough to start a flame war, engage an entire evening?s discussion and otherwise ignite the passions of designers of all stripes. Knowing where Saffer stands on the definition of the practice of IxD helps us better evaluate the rest of the book.
Saffer?s position on IxD is fundamentally humanistic ? a key plank of the IxDA ? and a much appreciated perspective still under-represented in the world of high-tech product development.
The book has several strengths. Saffer?s writing style is crisp, direct and clear. He supplements his ideas with clever illustrations, guest interviews and supporting examples. The layout, format, font and design helps support Saffer?s passion for the subject.
Further, Saffer offers us not only the basics about IxD (the what, why, and hows), he broadens our perspective of the practice beyond the Web, desktop or front panel. He dedicates an entire chapter to designing Services and finishes the book with a look at the trends in product/service design.
The book is not without flaws. It isn?t clear who Saffer?s audience is: students, novice practitioners, non-designers interested in this new discipline, experienced designers? As a result, it?s not clear whether this is a manifesto, textbook or how-to guide. In many ways it is all of these, focused on all of these audiences, and this lack of clarity may be a logical reflection of the emergent nature of the discipline and its still very limited corps of practitioners more than a true design flaw.
Looking at the book as a treatise, and accepting Saffer?s definition of IxD as a starting point for evaluating later chapters, Saffer does not deliver on the core phrase of his definition: to facilitate interactions between humans. In fact, a substantial number of his examples and contexts are about facilitating interaction between objects/machines/interfaces and people. To suggest that these elements are merely intermediaries between interacting people is to open the door to the notion that all design is just such an activity. Couldn?t one describe bricks-and-mortar architecture in the same terms ? that it isn?t the design of an environment but the design of an environment to facilitate people to people interactions? Obversely, I would argue that Saffer presents so many compelling examples of how interaction design can improve people?product interactions that it is actually too limiting to suggest IxD is fundamentally about improving interactions between or among humans.
Other flaws with the book are more easily rectified and (at the risk of reading too much into it) may be attributed to Saffer as designer rather than academic. Specifically, there is no bibliography or citations for many of Saffer?s statements. The reader, especially one new to the field, will be uncertain whether Saffer is restating an industry/academic position, or creating one of his own.
Consider his taxonomy of design approaches: User-Centered Design, Activity-Centered Design, Systems Design and Genius Design. Are these categories of his own making or are they culled from others? work that has come before? To his credit, Saffer does cite specific authors when he discusses their work, but the book would be much improved to provide ?chapter and verse? citations in an endnote/bibliographic form to assist the interested reader in learning more or going to the source.
All in all, the book is a substantial piece of work with an ambitious intent that Saffer delivers on well. I recommend it to anyone who is curious about this new form of design.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780321432063
Subtitle:
Creating Smart Applications and Clever Devices
Publisher:
New Riders
Author:
Saffer, Dan
Subject:
Internet - Web Site Design
Subject:
System design
Subject:
Human-computer interaction
Subject:
Internet - Application Development
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Voices That Matter
Publication Date:
July 2006
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
248
Dimensions:
9 x 7 x 0.421 in 451 gr

Related Subjects

Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » General
Computers and Internet » Graphics » User Interface

Designing for Interaction: Creating Smart Applications and Clever Devices
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Product details 248 pages New Riders Publishing - English 9780321432063 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Designing for Interaction is an introduction to the practice of interaction design, the design discipline behind such products as the iPhone and other touchscreen devices and innovative Web sites like Flickr. Aimed at new practitioners and students--as well as user experience professionals and developers--it is a comprehensive look at the discipline, from current methods to its future. This guide takes a holistic approach looking at interaction design for the Web, software, and devices. This new edition adds information on design strategy, extended research analysis, conceptual models, brainstorming, and user testing and development.

More than just a how-to manual, this is the only book on the subject coming from a design rather that computer science background. Filled with tips, real-world projects, and interviews of leading practitioners such as Marc Rettig, Brenda Laurel and Hugh Dubberly, you'll get a solid grounding in everything you need to successfully tackle interaction design.

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