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This title in other editions

Uncommon Arrangements: Seven Marriages

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Uncommon Arrangements: Seven Marriages Cover

 

Staff Pick

Reminiscent of Composing a Life, Mary Catherine Bateson's famous study of women's lives, Katie Roiphe's Uncommon Arrangements gives us a compelling sociological look at the inner workings of marriage. Culled from the histories of seven marriages from the British literary community circa 1910 to 1939, these unions were documented in private memoirs, personal correspondence, and published journals. Roiphe lifts the veil on these couples, and in doing so she illuminates much of what fascinates us about marriage and how the expectations of happiness within them are formed. I eagerly await the return of my copy, lent to a friend, so that I can reread this astonishing book.
Recommended by Lorraine, Powells.com

Review-A-Day

"Roiphe skillfully manages not only to illuminate an era and its ideals, but also — through reliance on memoirs and personal correspondence — to create engaging portraits of her complex and often amusing subjects (most of whom knew one other)." Marjorie Kehe, The Christian Science Monitor (read the entire CSM review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Katie Roiphe's stimulating work has made her one of the most talked about cultural critics of her generation. Now this bracing young writer delves deeply into one of the most layered of subjects: marriage.

Drawn in part from the private memoirs, personal correspondence, and long-forgotten journals of the British literary community from 1910 to the Second World War, here are seven "marriages à la mode" — each rising to the challenge of intimate relations in more or less creative ways. Jane Wells, the wife of H.G., remained his rock, despite his decade-long relationship with Rebecca West (among others). Katherine Mansfield had an irresponsible, childlike romance with her husband, John Middleton Murry, that collapsed under the strain of real-life problems. Vera Brittain and George Gordon Catlin spent years in a "semidetached" marriage (he in America, she in England). Vanessa Bell maintained a complicated harmony with the painter Duncan Grant, whom she loved, and her husband, Clive. And her sister Virginia Woolf, herself no stranger to marital particularities, sustained a brilliant running commentary on the most intimate details of those around her.

Every chapter revolves around a crisis that occurred in each of these marriages—as serious as life-threatening illness or as seemingly innocuous as a slightly tipsy dinner table conversation — and how it was resolved...or not resolved. In these portraits, Roiphe brilliantly evokes what are, as she says, "the fluctuations and shifts in attraction, the mysteries of lasting affection, the endurance and changes in love, and the role of friendship in marriage." The deeper mysteries at stake in all relationships.

Review:

"'In this astute and engrossing examination of seven artsy marriages from 20th-century England, Roiphe (Last Night in Paradise) couples her penchant for social criticism with her training in English literature (she holds a Ph.D. from Princeton). The book's title is apt, for some of the unions Roiphe describes may strike even today's jaded readers as outr. Feminist writer Vera Brittain proposed that she and her husband, George Catlin, be joined in their household by her dear friend, Winifred Holtby. Katherine Mansfield and John Middleton Murry found that their highly romantic conception of love failed to sustain them through illness and other crises. Roiphe also examines the unions of H.G. Wells and Jane Wells; Elizabeth von Arnim and John Francis Russell; Clive and Vanessa Bell; Ottoline and Philip Morrell; and Radclyffe Hall and Una Troubridge. Roiphe writes not just as a disinterested historian. She wants to know what she can learn from Brittain and the rest about marriage, and the themes Roiphe focuses on remain relevant to 21st-century marriages: is domesticity compatible with long-term emotional engagement, or are marriages destined to become boring? Roiphe finds that once people began to think of marriage as an arrangement that ought to produce human happiness, monogamy was no longer a given. Fans of Pamela Paul and Cathi Hanauer will enjoy this volume, which is vintage Roiphe: provocative, dishy, substantive and fun. (July)' Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)"

Review:

"[A] good portrayal of selfish artists....Entertaining highbrow gossip it may be, a good beach read for those with a literary bent, but Roiphe has done her research well, and is clearly a skilled writer." Philadelphia Inquirer

Review:

"Well written, thoughtful, measured....Even those who have familiarity with the characters who populate this book will not be wasting their time being taken through the stories again." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"Ms. Roiphe takes her subjects' ideas and dilemmas seriously, though not quite as seriously as they took themselves, and from that discrepancy arises much of the book's wisdom and wit. Her writing displays an intimate knowledge of the era..." Wall Street Journal

Review:

"Roiphe has hit upon a strategy that allows her to probe the mysteries of marriage with a kind of forensic delicacy. At the end of her book we feel we know these couples as intimately as if we were part of their circle..." Tina Brown, The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"Katie Roiphe's latest work of nonfiction, Uncommon Arragements, takes the celebrity couple story, turns it on its head and gives it a decidedly literary treatment." BookReporter.com

Synopsis:

Drawn in part from the private memoirs, personal correspondence, and long-forgotten journals of the British literary community from 1910 to the Second World War, this work portrays seven marriages--each rising to the challenge of intimacy in more or less creative ways.

About the Author

Katie Roiphe received her Ph.D. from Princeton in English literature. Her articles have appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, Slate, Esquire, Vogue, Harper's, and The New Yorker. Her previous books include The Morning After, Last Night in Paradise, and a novel, Still She Haunts Me. She lives in New York.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Rachel Dumaine, September 11, 2013 (view all comments by Rachel Dumaine)
A fascinating look into the most private aspects of the intimate relationships of seven famous writers of the early 1900s. I was especially excited to learn more about Radclyffe Hall, having inherited my mother's 1st edition copy of The Well of Loneliness 25 years ago. Roiphe explores with penetrating insight the conscious and not-so-conscious motivations, advantages and costs of their controversial and "uncommon" relationships.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780385339384
Author:
Roiphe, Katie
Publisher:
Dial Press
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh
Subject:
Biography-Literary
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20080531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
8.16x5.58x.81 in. .85 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Biography » Literary
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Humanities » Literary Criticism » General

Uncommon Arrangements: Seven Marriages New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$15.00 In Stock
Product details 352 pages Dial Press - English 9780385339384 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

Reminiscent of Composing a Life, Mary Catherine Bateson's famous study of women's lives, Katie Roiphe's Uncommon Arrangements gives us a compelling sociological look at the inner workings of marriage. Culled from the histories of seven marriages from the British literary community circa 1910 to 1939, these unions were documented in private memoirs, personal correspondence, and published journals. Roiphe lifts the veil on these couples, and in doing so she illuminates much of what fascinates us about marriage and how the expectations of happiness within them are formed. I eagerly await the return of my copy, lent to a friend, so that I can reread this astonishing book.

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "'In this astute and engrossing examination of seven artsy marriages from 20th-century England, Roiphe (Last Night in Paradise) couples her penchant for social criticism with her training in English literature (she holds a Ph.D. from Princeton). The book's title is apt, for some of the unions Roiphe describes may strike even today's jaded readers as outr. Feminist writer Vera Brittain proposed that she and her husband, George Catlin, be joined in their household by her dear friend, Winifred Holtby. Katherine Mansfield and John Middleton Murry found that their highly romantic conception of love failed to sustain them through illness and other crises. Roiphe also examines the unions of H.G. Wells and Jane Wells; Elizabeth von Arnim and John Francis Russell; Clive and Vanessa Bell; Ottoline and Philip Morrell; and Radclyffe Hall and Una Troubridge. Roiphe writes not just as a disinterested historian. She wants to know what she can learn from Brittain and the rest about marriage, and the themes Roiphe focuses on remain relevant to 21st-century marriages: is domesticity compatible with long-term emotional engagement, or are marriages destined to become boring? Roiphe finds that once people began to think of marriage as an arrangement that ought to produce human happiness, monogamy was no longer a given. Fans of Pamela Paul and Cathi Hanauer will enjoy this volume, which is vintage Roiphe: provocative, dishy, substantive and fun. (July)' Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)"
"Review A Day" by , "Roiphe skillfully manages not only to illuminate an era and its ideals, but also — through reliance on memoirs and personal correspondence — to create engaging portraits of her complex and often amusing subjects (most of whom knew one other)." (read the entire CSM review)
"Review" by , "[A] good portrayal of selfish artists....Entertaining highbrow gossip it may be, a good beach read for those with a literary bent, but Roiphe has done her research well, and is clearly a skilled writer."
"Review" by , "Well written, thoughtful, measured....Even those who have familiarity with the characters who populate this book will not be wasting their time being taken through the stories again."
"Review" by , "Ms. Roiphe takes her subjects' ideas and dilemmas seriously, though not quite as seriously as they took themselves, and from that discrepancy arises much of the book's wisdom and wit. Her writing displays an intimate knowledge of the era..."
"Review" by , "Roiphe has hit upon a strategy that allows her to probe the mysteries of marriage with a kind of forensic delicacy. At the end of her book we feel we know these couples as intimately as if we were part of their circle..."
"Review" by , "Katie Roiphe's latest work of nonfiction, Uncommon Arragements, takes the celebrity couple story, turns it on its head and gives it a decidedly literary treatment."
"Synopsis" by , Drawn in part from the private memoirs, personal correspondence, and long-forgotten journals of the British literary community from 1910 to the Second World War, this work portrays seven marriages--each rising to the challenge of intimacy in more or less creative ways.
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