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    Station Eleven

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This title in other editions

Fat Girl: A True Story

by

Fat Girl: A True Story Cover

ISBN13: 9780452285859
ISBN10: 0452285852
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A nonfiction She's Come Undone, Fat Girl is a powerfully honest and compulsively readable memoir of obsession with food, and with one's body, penned by a Guggenheim and NEA award-winning writer.

For any woman who has ever had a love/hate relationship with food and with how she looks; for anyone who has knowingly or unconsciously used food to try to fill the hole in his heart or soothe the craggy edges of his psyche, Fat Girl is a brilliantly rendered, angst-filled coming-of-age story of gain and loss. From the lush descriptions of food that call to mind the writings of M. F. K. Fisher at her finest, to the heartbreaking accounts of Moore's deep longing for a family and a sense of belonging and love, Fat Girl stuns and shocks, saddens and tickles.

Review:

"In her memoir of growing up fat, Moore, who previously wrote about food in Never Eat Your Heart Out, employs her edgy, refreshingly candid voice to tell the story of a little girl who weighed 112 pounds in second grade; whose father abandoned her to a raging, wicked mother straight out of the Brothers Grimm; whose lifelong dieting endeavors failed as miserably as her childhood attempts to find love at home. As relentless as this catalogue of beatings, humiliation and self-loathing can be, it's tolerable — even inspiring in places — because Moore pulls it off without a glimmer of self-pity. The book does have some high points, especially while Moore is stashed at the home of a kind uncle who harbors his own secrets, but the happiest moments are tinged with dread. Who can help wondering what will become of this tortured and miserable child? Alas, Moore cuts her story short after briefly touching on an unsatisfying reunion with her father and her two failed marriages. The ending feels hurried, but perhaps the publication of this book will give Moore's story the happy ending she deserves. Agent, Sarah Chalfant. (On sale Mar. 3)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Moore warns the reader not to expect a triumphant ending, and she's true to her word, though her book is strongly written and starkly compelling to the end." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Moore's tale is honest, engaging, and well crafted, if a little depressing." Library Journal

Review:

"Poignant, deeply felt, remarkably funny, Moore's memoir will resonate with anyone who's ever lived with self-hatred." Booklist

Review:

"A book of painful and ferocious eloquence." Robert Hass, Poet Laureate of the United States

Review:

"Editor's Choice: Grade A. Moore's unflinching and disturbing memoir sets a new standard for literature about women and their bodies...[Moore] writes with terrifying, icy candor...[A] searing and saddening experience, one you will not easily forget." Jennifer Reese, Entertainment Weekly

Review:

"Judith Moore ambushes you on the very first page of this memoir, and in short order has lifted you up and broken your heart with a portrait of the artist as a young pariah....[U]nflinchingly stark, yet sometimes lyrical and often funny." Peg Tyre, Newsweek

Review:

"[B]y the end of this riveting book you will have an intimate understanding of how the author's orgiastic pleasure in the luscious tastes and textures of food has fed the deep disgust, the self-hate that accompanied her submission to her desires. And her grace will kindle your compassion and respect." Valerie Monroe, O: The Oprah Magazine

Review:

"Frank, often funny — intelligent and entertaining." Vick Boughton, People

Review:

"Searingly honest without affectation...Moore emerged from her hellish upbringing as a kind of softer Diane Arbus, wielding pen instead of camera." Kimberly Marlowe Hartnett, The Seattle Times

Review:

"God, I love this book. It is wise, funny, painful, revealing, and profoundly honest." Anne Lamott

Review:

"Judith Moore grabs the reader by the collar, and shakes up our notion of life in the fat lane." David Sedaris

Review:

"A slap-in-the-face of a book — courageous, heartbreaking, fascinating, and darkly funny." Augusten Burroughs

Synopsis:

A nonfiction She's Come Undone, Fat Girl is a powerfully honest, compulsively readable memoir of obsession with food, and with one's body, penned by a Guggenheim and NEA award-winning writer.

Synopsis:

For any woman who has ever had a love/hate relationship with food and with how she looks; for anyone who has knowingly or unconsciously used food to try to fill the hole in his heart or soothe the craggy edges of his psyche, Fat Girl is a brilliantly rendered, angst-filled coming-of-age story of gain and loss. From the lush descriptions of food that call to mind the writings of M.F.K. Fisher at her finest, to the heartbreaking accounts of Moore’s deep longing for family and a sense of belonging and love, Fat Girl stuns and shocks, saddens and tickles.

Synopsis:

For any woman who has ever had a love/hate relationship with food and with how she looks; for anyone who has knowingly or unconsciously used food to try to fill the hole in his heart or soothe the craggy edges of his psyche, Fat Girl is a brilliantly rendered, angst-filled coming-of-age story of gain and loss. From the lush descriptions of food that call to mind the writings of M.F. K.Fisher at her finest, to the heartbreaking accounts of Moore's deep longing for family and a sense of belonging and love, Fat Girl stuns and shocks, saddens and tickles.

?Frank, often funny?intelligent and entertaining.?

?Vick Boughton, People (four out of four stars)

?Moore's unflinching memoir sets a new standard for literature about women and their bodies. Grade: A.?

?Jennifer Reese, Entertainment Weekly (editor's choice)

?Searingly honest without affectation . . . Moore emerged fromher hellish upbringing as a kind of softer Diane Arbus, wielding pen instead of camera.?

?Kimberly Marlowe Hartnett, The Seattle Times

?Stark . . . lyrical, and often funny, Judith Moore ambushes you on the very first page, and in short order has lifted you up and broken your heart.?

?Peg Tyre, Newsweek

?God, I love this book. It is wise, funny, painful, revealing, and profoundly honest.?

?Anne Lamott

?Judith Moore grabs the reader by the collar, and shakes up our notion of life in the fat lane.?

?David Sedaris

?A slap-in-the-face of a book?courageous, heartbreaking, fascinating, and darkly funny.?

?Augusten Burroughs

About the Author

Judith Moore, recipient of two National Endowments for the Arts and a Guggenheim fellowship, is the author of the critically acclaimed memoir Never Eat Your Heart Out, a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. Moore is the books editor and senior editor for the San Diego Reader and lives in Berkeley, California.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

Lana, February 1, 2008 (view all comments by Lana)
This book is honest, funny, horrific, tragic, and poignant without being trite. Judith Moore manages to tell her story thoroughly without whining, self-deprecating, or trying to make too much of a point. You find meaning and wisdom in the book, but just by reading the story; not by having it shoved down your throat.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(4 of 6 readers found this comment helpful)
Lexa, July 2, 2007 (view all comments by Lexa)
Moore does a magnificent job describing herself and her ways... truly a work of art. "Fat Girl" does a wonderful job of making you connect- even if you don't have anything in common. I haven't felt so involved in a book in years!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(4 of 7 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 2 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780452285859
Author:
Moore, Judith
Publisher:
Plume Books
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Health/Exercise & Fitness
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Biography-Health and Fitness
Subject:
Biography-Women
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Publication Date:
20060331
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
7.78x5.18x.39 in. .31 lbs.
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Biography » Women
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Eating Disorders
Health and Self-Help » Recovery and Addiction » Eating Disorders
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Featured Titles

Fat Girl: A True Story New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$14.00 In Stock
Product details 208 pages Plume Books - English 9780452285859 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In her memoir of growing up fat, Moore, who previously wrote about food in Never Eat Your Heart Out, employs her edgy, refreshingly candid voice to tell the story of a little girl who weighed 112 pounds in second grade; whose father abandoned her to a raging, wicked mother straight out of the Brothers Grimm; whose lifelong dieting endeavors failed as miserably as her childhood attempts to find love at home. As relentless as this catalogue of beatings, humiliation and self-loathing can be, it's tolerable — even inspiring in places — because Moore pulls it off without a glimmer of self-pity. The book does have some high points, especially while Moore is stashed at the home of a kind uncle who harbors his own secrets, but the happiest moments are tinged with dread. Who can help wondering what will become of this tortured and miserable child? Alas, Moore cuts her story short after briefly touching on an unsatisfying reunion with her father and her two failed marriages. The ending feels hurried, but perhaps the publication of this book will give Moore's story the happy ending she deserves. Agent, Sarah Chalfant. (On sale Mar. 3)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Moore warns the reader not to expect a triumphant ending, and she's true to her word, though her book is strongly written and starkly compelling to the end."
"Review" by , "Moore's tale is honest, engaging, and well crafted, if a little depressing."
"Review" by , "Poignant, deeply felt, remarkably funny, Moore's memoir will resonate with anyone who's ever lived with self-hatred."
"Review" by , "A book of painful and ferocious eloquence."
"Review" by , "Editor's Choice: Grade A. Moore's unflinching and disturbing memoir sets a new standard for literature about women and their bodies...[Moore] writes with terrifying, icy candor...[A] searing and saddening experience, one you will not easily forget."
"Review" by , "Judith Moore ambushes you on the very first page of this memoir, and in short order has lifted you up and broken your heart with a portrait of the artist as a young pariah....[U]nflinchingly stark, yet sometimes lyrical and often funny."
"Review" by , "[B]y the end of this riveting book you will have an intimate understanding of how the author's orgiastic pleasure in the luscious tastes and textures of food has fed the deep disgust, the self-hate that accompanied her submission to her desires. And her grace will kindle your compassion and respect."
"Review" by , "Frank, often funny — intelligent and entertaining."
"Review" by , "Searingly honest without affectation...Moore emerged from her hellish upbringing as a kind of softer Diane Arbus, wielding pen instead of camera."
"Review" by , "God, I love this book. It is wise, funny, painful, revealing, and profoundly honest."
"Review" by , "Judith Moore grabs the reader by the collar, and shakes up our notion of life in the fat lane."
"Review" by , "A slap-in-the-face of a book — courageous, heartbreaking, fascinating, and darkly funny."
"Synopsis" by , A nonfiction She's Come Undone, Fat Girl is a powerfully honest, compulsively readable memoir of obsession with food, and with one's body, penned by a Guggenheim and NEA award-winning writer.
"Synopsis" by ,
For any woman who has ever had a love/hate relationship with food and with how she looks; for anyone who has knowingly or unconsciously used food to try to fill the hole in his heart or soothe the craggy edges of his psyche, Fat Girl is a brilliantly rendered, angst-filled coming-of-age story of gain and loss. From the lush descriptions of food that call to mind the writings of M.F.K. Fisher at her finest, to the heartbreaking accounts of Moore’s deep longing for family and a sense of belonging and love, Fat Girl stuns and shocks, saddens and tickles.

"Synopsis" by , For any woman who has ever had a love/hate relationship with food and with how she looks; for anyone who has knowingly or unconsciously used food to try to fill the hole in his heart or soothe the craggy edges of his psyche, Fat Girl is a brilliantly rendered, angst-filled coming-of-age story of gain and loss. From the lush descriptions of food that call to mind the writings of M.F. K.Fisher at her finest, to the heartbreaking accounts of Moore's deep longing for family and a sense of belonging and love, Fat Girl stuns and shocks, saddens and tickles.

?Frank, often funny?intelligent and entertaining.?

?Vick Boughton, People (four out of four stars)

?Moore's unflinching memoir sets a new standard for literature about women and their bodies. Grade: A.?

?Jennifer Reese, Entertainment Weekly (editor's choice)

?Searingly honest without affectation . . . Moore emerged fromher hellish upbringing as a kind of softer Diane Arbus, wielding pen instead of camera.?

?Kimberly Marlowe Hartnett, The Seattle Times

?Stark . . . lyrical, and often funny, Judith Moore ambushes you on the very first page, and in short order has lifted you up and broken your heart.?

?Peg Tyre, Newsweek

?God, I love this book. It is wise, funny, painful, revealing, and profoundly honest.?

?Anne Lamott

?Judith Moore grabs the reader by the collar, and shakes up our notion of life in the fat lane.?

?David Sedaris

?A slap-in-the-face of a book?courageous, heartbreaking, fascinating, and darkly funny.?

?Augusten Burroughs

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