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This title in other editions

Crimes Against Nature: Squatters, Poachers, Thieves, and the Hidden History of American Conservation

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Crimes Against Nature: Squatters, Poachers, Thieves, and the Hidden History of American Conservation Cover

 

Awards

Winner of the 2001 Littleton-Griswold Prize, American Historical Association
Co-winner of the 2001 George Perkins Marsh Prize for the best book in environmental history, American Society for Environmental History

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"This insightful and lucid book combines social with environmental history, enriching both. . . . Timely, eloquent, and provocative, Crimes against Nature illuminates contemporary struggles, especially in the West, over our environment."—Alan Taylor, author of William Cooper's Town

"A compelling new interpretation of early conservation history in the United States. . . . Powerfully argued and beautifully written, this book could hardly be more relevant to the environmental challenges we face today."—William Cronon, author of Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West

"What a powerful and yet subtle tale of the fraught encounter between the conservationists' desire to 'engineer' wilderness with the property regime of the modern state and the unique, local, 'moral ecologies' of those who resisted! Rarely has this level of originality, close reasoning, and historical texture been brought into such harmony while preserving the whiff of lived experience."—James C. Scott, author of Seeing Like a State

Review:

"An unsettling study of early conservation, one that reminds readers that battles to save nature were also battles to colonize places and peoples....This is an excellent and timely book." Joseph Taylor III, Journal of American History

Review:

"A well-conceived, solidly researched, and clearly written work with important conclusions but even richer possibilities. Anyone interested in environmental history or the contributions it can make to other fields in our discipline ought to read it. Anyone interested in important questions and methods in environmental history has to study it carefully." Thomas Dunlap, Reviews in American History

Review:

"This insightful and lucid book combines social with environmental history, enriching both....Timely, eloquent, and provocative, Crimes against Nature illuminates contemporary struggles, especially in the West, over our environment." Alan Taylor, author of William Cooper's Town

Review:

"A compelling new interpretation of early conservation history in the United States....Powerfully argued and beautifully written, this book could hardly be more relevant to the environmental challenges we face today." William Cronon, author of Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West

Review:

"What a powerful and yet subtle tale of the fraught encounter between the conservationists' desire to 'engineer' wilderness with the property regime of the modern state and the unique, local, 'moral ecologies' of those who resisted! Rarely has this level of originality, close reasoning, and historical texture been brought into such harmony while preserving the whiff of lived experience." James C. Scott, author of Seeing Like a State

Synopsis:

Crimes against Nature reveals the hidden history behind three of the nation's first parklands: the Adirondacks, Yellowstone, and the Grand Canyon. Focusing on conservation's impact on local inhabitants, Karl Jacoby traces the effect of criminalizing such traditional practices as hunting, fishing, foraging, and timber cutting in the newly created parks. Jacoby reassesses the nature of these "crimes" and provides a rich portrait of rural people and their relationship with the natural world in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Synopsis:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 267-291) and index.

About the Author

Karl Jacoby is the Robert J. Carney Assistant Professor of History at Brown University.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations

List of Tables

Preface

Introduction: The Hidden History of American Conservation

PART ONE: Forest: The Adirondacks

1. The Re-creation of Nature

2. Public Property and Private Parks

3. Working-Class Wilderness

PART TWO: Mountain: Yellowstone

4. Nature and Nation

5. Fort Yellowstone

6. Modes of Poaching and Production

PART THREE Desert: The Grand Canyon

7. The Havasupai Problem

8. Farewell Song

Epilogue: Landscapes of Memory and Myth

Chronology of American Conservation

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780520239098
Subtitle:
Squatters, Poachers, Thieves, and the Hidden History of American Conservation
Author:
Jacoby, Karl
Publisher:
University of California Press
Location:
Berkeley
Subject:
General
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
National parks and reserves
Subject:
Natural Resources
Subject:
Nature conservation
Subject:
Nature conservation -- Social aspects.
Subject:
General History
Subject:
US History-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series Volume:
179.
Publication Date:
February 3, 2003
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
21 b/w photographs, 4 maps, 9 tables
Pages:
324
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 1 in 20 oz

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » US History » General
Science and Mathematics » Agriculture » General
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Environment
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » General
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » General

Crimes Against Nature: Squatters, Poachers, Thieves, and the Hidden History of American Conservation Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.50 In Stock
Product details 324 pages Paperbacks - English 9780520239098 Reviews:
"Review" by , "An unsettling study of early conservation, one that reminds readers that battles to save nature were also battles to colonize places and peoples....This is an excellent and timely book."
"Review" by , "A well-conceived, solidly researched, and clearly written work with important conclusions but even richer possibilities. Anyone interested in environmental history or the contributions it can make to other fields in our discipline ought to read it. Anyone interested in important questions and methods in environmental history has to study it carefully."
"Review" by , "This insightful and lucid book combines social with environmental history, enriching both....Timely, eloquent, and provocative, Crimes against Nature illuminates contemporary struggles, especially in the West, over our environment."
"Review" by , "A compelling new interpretation of early conservation history in the United States....Powerfully argued and beautifully written, this book could hardly be more relevant to the environmental challenges we face today."
"Review" by , "What a powerful and yet subtle tale of the fraught encounter between the conservationists' desire to 'engineer' wilderness with the property regime of the modern state and the unique, local, 'moral ecologies' of those who resisted! Rarely has this level of originality, close reasoning, and historical texture been brought into such harmony while preserving the whiff of lived experience."
"Synopsis" by ,
Crimes against Nature reveals the hidden history behind three of the nation's first parklands: the Adirondacks, Yellowstone, and the Grand Canyon. Focusing on conservation's impact on local inhabitants, Karl Jacoby traces the effect of criminalizing such traditional practices as hunting, fishing, foraging, and timber cutting in the newly created parks. Jacoby reassesses the nature of these "crimes" and provides a rich portrait of rural people and their relationship with the natural world in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
"Synopsis" by , Includes bibliographical references (p. 267-291) and index.
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