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The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science (James H. Silberman Books)

by

The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science (James H. Silberman Books) Cover

ISBN13: 9780670038305
ISBN10: 067003830x
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

An astonishing new science called neuroplasticity is overthrowing the centuries-old notion that the human brain is immutable. Psychiatrist and psychoanalyst, Norman Doidge, M.D., traveled the country to meet both the brilliant scientists championing neuroplasticity and the people whose lives theyve transformedpeople whose mental limitations or brain damage were seen as unalterable. We see a woman born with half a brain that rewired itself to work as a whole, blind people who learn to see, learning disorders cured, IQs raised, aging brains rejuvenated, stroke patients learning to speak, children with cerebral palsy learning to move with more grace, depression and anxiety disorders successfully treated, and lifelong character traits changed. Using these marvelous stories to probe mysteries of the body, emotion, love, sex, culture, and education, Dr. Doidge has written an immensely moving, inspiring book that will permanently alter the way we look at our brains, human nature, and human potential.

Review:

"For years the doctrine of neuroscientists has been that the brain is a machine: break a part and you lose that function permanently. But more and more evidence is turning up to show that the brain can rewire itself, even in the face of catastrophic trauma: essentially, the functions of the brain can be strengthened just like a weak muscle. Scientists have taught a woman with damaged inner ears, who for five years had had 'a sense of perpetual falling,' to regain her sense of balance with a sensor on her tongue, and a stroke victim to recover the ability to walk although 97% of the nerves from the cerebral cortex to the spine were destroyed. With detailed case studies reminiscent of Oliver Sachs, combined with extensive interviews with lead researchers, Doidge, a research psychiatrist and psychoanalyst at Columbia and the University of Toronto, slowly turns everything we thought we knew about the brain upside down. He is, perhaps, overenthusiastic about the possibilities, believing that this new science can fix every neurological problem, from learning disabilities to blindness. But Doidge writes interestingly and engagingly about some of the least understood marvels of the brain." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Only a few decades ago, scientists considered the brain to be fixed or 'hardwired,' and considered most forms of brain damage, therefore, to be incurable. Dr. Doidge, an eminent psychiatrist and researcher, was struck by how his patients' own transformations belied this, and set out to explore the new science of neuroplasticity by interviewing both scientific pioneers in neuroscience, and patients who have benefited from neuro-rehabilitation. Here he describes in fascinating personal narratives how the brain, far from being fixed, has remarkable powers of changing its own structure and compensating for even the most challenging neurological conditions. Doidge's book is a remarkable and hopeful portrait of the endless adaptability of the human brain." Oliver Sacks

Review:

"The power of positive thinking finally gains scientific credibility. Mind-bending, miracle-working, reality-busting stuff, with implications, as Dr. Doidge notes, not only for individual patients with neurologic disease but for all human beings, not to mention human culture, human learning and human history." New York Times

Review:

"[Doidge] links scientific experimentation with personal triumph in a way that inspires awe for the brain, and for these scientists' faith in its capacity. A valuable compilation of work that seeks to prove the unsung adaptability of our most mysterious organ. Readers will want to read entire sections aloud and pass the book on to someone who can benefit from it." Washington Post

Review:

"Lucid and absolutely fascinating....[Doidge is] able to explain current research in neuroscience with clarity and thoroughness." Chicago Tribune

Review:

"Doidge provides a history of the research in this growing field, highlighting scientists at the edge of groundbreaking discoveries and telling fascinating stories of people who have benefited." Psychology Today

Synopsis:

The dramatic story of one manand#8217;s recovery offers new hope to those suffering from concussions and other brain traumas

and#160;

and#160;In 1999, Clark Elliott suffered a concussion when his car was rear-ended. Overnight his life changed from that of a rising professor with a research career in artificial intelligence to a humbled man struggling to get through a single day. At times he couldnand#8217;t walk across a room, or even name his five children. Doctors told him he would never fully recover.and#160; After eight years, the cognitive demands of his job, and of being a single parent, finally became more than he could manage. As a result of one final effort to recover, he crossed paths with two brilliant Chicago-area research-cliniciansand#151;one a specialized optometrist, the other a cognitive psychologistand#151;working on the leading edge of brain plasticity. He was substantially improved within weeks.

and#160;

Remarkably, Elliott kept detailed notes throughout his experience, from the moment of impact to the final stages of his recovery, astounding documentation that is the basis of this fascinating book.and#160;The Ghost in My Brainand#160;gives hope to the millions who suffer from head injuries each year, and provides a unique and informative window into the worldand#8217;s most complex computationaland#160;device: the human brain.

Synopsis:

The New York Times bestselling author of The Brain That Changes Itself presents astounding advances in the treatment of brain injury and illness

In The Brain That Changes Itself, Norman Doidge described the most important breakthrough in our understanding of the brain in four hundred years: the discovery that the brain can change its own structure and function in response to mental experience—what we call neuroplasticity.

His revolutionary new book shows, for the first time, how the amazing process of neuroplastic healing really works. It describes natural, non-invasive avenues into the brain provided by the forms of energy around us—light, sound, vibration, movement—which pass through our senses and our bodies to awaken the brains own healing capacities without producing unpleasant side effects. Doidge explores cases where patients alleviated years of chronic pain or recovered from debilitating strokes or accidents; children on the autistic spectrum or with learning disorders normalizing; symptoms of multiple sclerosis, Parkinsons disease, and cerebral palsy radically improved, and other near-miracle recoveries. And we learn how to vastly reduce the risk of dementia with simple approaches anyone can use.

For centuries it was believed that the brains complexity prevented recovery from damage or disease. The Brains Way of Healing shows that this very sophistication is the source of a unique kind of healing. As he did so lucidly in The Brain That Changes Itself, Doidge uses stories to present cutting-edge science with practical real-world applications, and principles that everyone can apply to improve their brains performance and health.

About the Author

Norman Doidge, M.D., is a psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, and researcher on the faculty at the University of Toronto's Department of Psychiatry and the Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research in New York, as well as an author, essayist, and poet. He is a four-time recipient of Canada's National Magazine Gold Award. He divides his time between Toronto and New York.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Douglas Cobb, June 23, 2007 (view all comments by Douglas Cobb)
Do you know someone who has had a stroke? How about someone with a learning disability? Or, are you interested in maintaining your intellect and mental facilities as you get older? If you've answered "Yes" to any of these questions, then The Brain That Changes Itself by Norman Doidge, M.D., should interest you a lot. It's like an "Owner's Manual" for the brain, filled with stories of personal triumph against all odds, like recoveries from strokes that people would have believed to be impossible a few short years ago.
Far from being dry and boring, it's filled with engrossing information about advances being made in neuroplasticity--the idea that the brain is not some "hardwired" type of machine, but is plastic, and one part can take over functions of another part that's been damaged. The information is made very pertinent and relevant by giving names and faces to many people who've been helped by neuroplasticians. The Brain That Changes Itself is a great read I highly recommend.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(12 of 13 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780670038305
Author:
Doidge, Norman
Publisher:
Viking Books
Author:
Frazzetto, Giovanni
Author:
Elliott, Clark
Author:
Hurley, Dan
Author:
Dehaene, Stanislas
Subject:
Neuropsychology
Subject:
Rehabilitation
Subject:
Neuroplasticity
Subject:
Life Sciences - Biology - General
Subject:
Life Sciences - Anatomy & Physiology
Subject:
Life Sciences - Human Anatomy & Physiology
Subject:
Neurology - General
Subject:
Neuroscience
Subject:
Brain damage -- Patients -- Rehabilitation.
Subject:
Health and Medicine-Medical Specialties
Subject:
Cognitive Psychology
Subject:
Emotions
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardback
Series:
James H. Silberman Books
Publication Date:
20070431
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
20 line drawings
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1 lb
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Brain
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Mind and Consciousness
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » Memory and Thinking Skills

The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science (James H. Silberman Books) New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$24.95 In Stock
Product details 336 pages Viking Books - English 9780670038305 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "For years the doctrine of neuroscientists has been that the brain is a machine: break a part and you lose that function permanently. But more and more evidence is turning up to show that the brain can rewire itself, even in the face of catastrophic trauma: essentially, the functions of the brain can be strengthened just like a weak muscle. Scientists have taught a woman with damaged inner ears, who for five years had had 'a sense of perpetual falling,' to regain her sense of balance with a sensor on her tongue, and a stroke victim to recover the ability to walk although 97% of the nerves from the cerebral cortex to the spine were destroyed. With detailed case studies reminiscent of Oliver Sachs, combined with extensive interviews with lead researchers, Doidge, a research psychiatrist and psychoanalyst at Columbia and the University of Toronto, slowly turns everything we thought we knew about the brain upside down. He is, perhaps, overenthusiastic about the possibilities, believing that this new science can fix every neurological problem, from learning disabilities to blindness. But Doidge writes interestingly and engagingly about some of the least understood marvels of the brain." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Only a few decades ago, scientists considered the brain to be fixed or 'hardwired,' and considered most forms of brain damage, therefore, to be incurable. Dr. Doidge, an eminent psychiatrist and researcher, was struck by how his patients' own transformations belied this, and set out to explore the new science of neuroplasticity by interviewing both scientific pioneers in neuroscience, and patients who have benefited from neuro-rehabilitation. Here he describes in fascinating personal narratives how the brain, far from being fixed, has remarkable powers of changing its own structure and compensating for even the most challenging neurological conditions. Doidge's book is a remarkable and hopeful portrait of the endless adaptability of the human brain."
"Review" by , "The power of positive thinking finally gains scientific credibility. Mind-bending, miracle-working, reality-busting stuff, with implications, as Dr. Doidge notes, not only for individual patients with neurologic disease but for all human beings, not to mention human culture, human learning and human history."
"Review" by , "[Doidge] links scientific experimentation with personal triumph in a way that inspires awe for the brain, and for these scientists' faith in its capacity. A valuable compilation of work that seeks to prove the unsung adaptability of our most mysterious organ. Readers will want to read entire sections aloud and pass the book on to someone who can benefit from it."
"Review" by , "Lucid and absolutely fascinating....[Doidge is] able to explain current research in neuroscience with clarity and thoroughness."
"Review" by , "Doidge provides a history of the research in this growing field, highlighting scientists at the edge of groundbreaking discoveries and telling fascinating stories of people who have benefited."
"Synopsis" by ,
The dramatic story of one manand#8217;s recovery offers new hope to those suffering from concussions and other brain traumas

and#160;

and#160;In 1999, Clark Elliott suffered a concussion when his car was rear-ended. Overnight his life changed from that of a rising professor with a research career in artificial intelligence to a humbled man struggling to get through a single day. At times he couldnand#8217;t walk across a room, or even name his five children. Doctors told him he would never fully recover.and#160; After eight years, the cognitive demands of his job, and of being a single parent, finally became more than he could manage. As a result of one final effort to recover, he crossed paths with two brilliant Chicago-area research-cliniciansand#151;one a specialized optometrist, the other a cognitive psychologistand#151;working on the leading edge of brain plasticity. He was substantially improved within weeks.

and#160;

Remarkably, Elliott kept detailed notes throughout his experience, from the moment of impact to the final stages of his recovery, astounding documentation that is the basis of this fascinating book.and#160;The Ghost in My Brainand#160;gives hope to the millions who suffer from head injuries each year, and provides a unique and informative window into the worldand#8217;s most complex computationaland#160;device: the human brain.

"Synopsis" by ,
The New York Times bestselling author of The Brain That Changes Itself presents astounding advances in the treatment of brain injury and illness

In The Brain That Changes Itself, Norman Doidge described the most important breakthrough in our understanding of the brain in four hundred years: the discovery that the brain can change its own structure and function in response to mental experience—what we call neuroplasticity.

His revolutionary new book shows, for the first time, how the amazing process of neuroplastic healing really works. It describes natural, non-invasive avenues into the brain provided by the forms of energy around us—light, sound, vibration, movement—which pass through our senses and our bodies to awaken the brains own healing capacities without producing unpleasant side effects. Doidge explores cases where patients alleviated years of chronic pain or recovered from debilitating strokes or accidents; children on the autistic spectrum or with learning disorders normalizing; symptoms of multiple sclerosis, Parkinsons disease, and cerebral palsy radically improved, and other near-miracle recoveries. And we learn how to vastly reduce the risk of dementia with simple approaches anyone can use.

For centuries it was believed that the brains complexity prevented recovery from damage or disease. The Brains Way of Healing shows that this very sophistication is the source of a unique kind of healing. As he did so lucidly in The Brain That Changes Itself, Doidge uses stories to present cutting-edge science with practical real-world applications, and principles that everyone can apply to improve their brains performance and health.

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