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1 Burnside - Bldg. 2 Nautical- Knots
19 Local Warehouse Nautical- General
14 Remote Warehouse Nautical- Sailing

The Morrow Guide To Knots

by

The Morrow Guide To Knots Cover

ISBN13: 9780688012267
ISBN10: 0688012264
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Chapter One

The aim of this handbook is basically instructive, so we have concentrated on two specific aspects: illustrations and terminology. We consider illustrations to be the simplest and most immediate way of explaining how a knot is tied, so we have filmed every step and arranged the photographs in a logical sequence, showing each stage from the viewpoint of the person tying the knot. You need only take a length of rope and follow the photographs step by step to find that you have the completed knot in your hand.

The terminology used has been subordinated to the illustrations and, with the exception of a few concessions to the art of seamanship, has been kept as simple as possible. All you need remember is that working means tightening and shaping and that a turn is one round of a rope to be able to understand the book fully. For the terms end and standing part, refer to the illustrations. The end (2) is the termination of the rope or the free part towards the termination of the rope with which the knot is tied; the standing part (1 ) is the part which is not actively used in making the knot and around which the knot is tied by the end. The slack part of the rope between the end and the standing part is the bight, especially when it forms a loop or a semicircle as at point 3 of the illustration.

One final word: it is not necessary to know a great number of knots; four or five-such as the bowline, the sheet bend, the clove hitch, and the figure-eight knot-are sufficient to cope confidently with any situation. The most important thing is to know how to tie them quickly and properly and with the minimum number of movements. The only way to gain the necessaryconfidence is to practice the knots over and over again until the movements become completely automatic and, instinctive, for in certain circumstances hesitation or doubt can make the knot an enemy or at least a dangerous complication instead of a safety factor.

Cordage

cordage

Rope was one of man's first inventions, certainly predating the wheel, and its structure has remained essentially the same for centuries, although the advent of synthetic fibers has given it a strength comparable, and in certain ways superior, to that of steel.

Rope and knot are two words that go hand in hand, for one is useless without the other; what use is a length of rope without at least one knot in it? Up to a few decades ago, the choice of rope was limited: hemp and manilla were used for their strength, cotton for manageability, and sisal for economy; but today the availability of synthetic fibers has produced a specialized type of rope for every application.

structure

Rope is made up of fibers (a) twisted together a number of times, each in the opposite direction to the previous one, to form, first of all, the yarn (b), then the strands (c) and finally the rope itself. This operation is known as laying up and produces the classic rope generally made up of three (1 ) and sometimes more strands (2), but there is another way of producing rope, namely by braiding the yarn (3) instead of twisting it together; with this kind of rope the outer part, known as the sheath (e), is both a protective and an attractive covering, while the strength of the rope lies solely in its internal part which is also braided and is known as the core (d). Both types of rope have their own specialcharacteristics which make them better suited to certain applications; twisted rope is less flexible and better for heavy-duty work, whereas braided rope is a lot softer and if pre-stretched does not expand any further. Rope should be bought with a view to choosing the most suitable type for the job you have in mind.

materials The characteristics of a rope obviously depend to a great extent on the fibers that make it up, so it is useful to know what the characteristics of the different materials are. From this you can deduce those of the corresponding rope.

The names of the materials may be somewhat confused as chemical names like polyester are freely mixed with the manufacturer's brand names such as Tergal, Dacron, etc. The following list gives only the chemical classifications and the table on page 14 gives the most common brand names for the equivalent products. It should also be noted that manufacturing companies now offer many variants of the same product (with greater or less strength, elasticity etc.). The following data refer to average characteristics.

a.) fiber b.) yarn c.) strand d.) core e.) sheath
1 & 2. twisted rope 3. braided rope

Synopsis:

An entirely different kind of knot book, this compact, practical guide takes full advantage of color photography to teach readers how to tie 70 of the most useful knots they can know. Unlike illustrations, the photos show every step looking over the shoulder of the tier. Color-coding makes the ropes easy to distinguish. 647 photos.

Synopsis:

Here is an entirely different kind of knot book! For the first time, here are step-by-step instructions that take full advantage of color photography to teach the art of tying knots. Unlike illustrations in other books, these pictures show every step looking over the shoulder of the tier — the way you see the knot as you make it. And when two or more ropes are involved, they are color coded so you can clearly tell them apart.

Included in addition are a section on decorative knots, a cross-reference list of the many applications of knots, and a detailed glossary. The Morrow Guide to Knots is a reliable and essential reference tool for all sportsmen and campers, homeowners, and youngsters as well.

About the Author

Deliciously terrifying short short tales and creepy illustrations by an exceptional collection of writers and illustrators.

Nadia Aguiar, M.T. Anderson, Katherine Applegate, Margaret Atwood, Avi, Holly Black, Pseudonymous Bosch, Libba Bray, Lisa Brown, Michael Connelly, Mark Crilley, Joseph Delaney, Dan Ehrenhaft, Carson Ellis, Neil Gaiman, Jack Gantos, Tom Genrich, Stacey Godiner, Carol Gorman, Alan Gratz, Josh Greenhut, Adele Griffin, Dan Gutman, Brett Helquist, Erin Hunter, Angela Johnson, Aliza Kellerman, Faye Kellerman, M. E. Kerr, Jon Klassen, Alice Kuipers, Jonathan Lethem, Gail Carson Levine, Lesley Livingston, Dean Lorey, Gregory Maguire, Stephen Marche, Melissa Marr, Alison McGhee, Brad Meltzer, Sienna Mercer, Lauren Myracle, Jenny Nimmo, Joyce Carol Oates, Ken Oppel, James Patterson, Michèle Perry, Yvonne Prinz, Francine Prose, Vladimir Radunsky, Chris Raschka, Aaron Renier, Adam Rex, David Rich, Richard Sala, Jon Scieszka, Brian Selznick, Arthur Slade, Abi Slone, Lane Smith, Lemony Snicket, Sonya Sones, Jerry Spinelli, David Stahler Jr., R. L. Stine, Allan Stratton, Tui T. Sutherland, Mariko Tamaki, Sarah L. Thomson, Frank Viva, Ayelet Waldman, Sarah Weeks, Gloria Whelan, Barry Yourgrau

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

egogrif, February 6, 2011 (view all comments by egogrif)
I've tried a lot of books on knot tying, but this is the best one I've found. It uses photographs for each step, and so unlike other books you don't have to decipher cryptic text-only instructions to figure out what to do next. The knots are classified according to their basic types, which means that even if the knot you want isn't in here - and because of the space given to photographs, the Morrow Guide isn't comprehensive - you will at least be able to learn a related knot, or something that will do the same job. I especially appreciate the fact that the book gives the purpose of each knot, whether it will move or stay fast, and how to untie it. I have used this book for sailing, camping, yardwork, and just for keeping my hands busy when I'm bored!
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780688012267
Editor:
Bigon, Mario
Author:
Regazzoni, Guido
Author:
Bigon, Mario
Author:
by Various
Author:
Various
Author:
Various, Various
Publisher:
Collins Reference
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Ships & Shipbuilding - Engineering
Subject:
Sailing
Subject:
Knots and splices
Subject:
Sailing - General
Subject:
General Reference
Subject:
Nautical - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
American
Series Volume:
no. DOE 81-12
Publication Date:
19820901
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
7.5 x 5 in 14.88 oz

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Related Subjects


Hobbies, Crafts, and Leisure » Crafts » General
Hobbies, Crafts, and Leisure » Crafts » Macrame
Transportation » Nautical » General
Transportation » Nautical » Knots
Transportation » Nautical » Sailing

The Morrow Guide To Knots New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$16.99 In Stock
Product details 256 pages HarperResource - English 9780688012267 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , An entirely different kind of knot book, this compact, practical guide takes full advantage of color photography to teach readers how to tie 70 of the most useful knots they can know. Unlike illustrations, the photos show every step looking over the shoulder of the tier. Color-coding makes the ropes easy to distinguish. 647 photos.
"Synopsis" by , Here is an entirely different kind of knot book! For the first time, here are step-by-step instructions that take full advantage of color photography to teach the art of tying knots. Unlike illustrations in other books, these pictures show every step looking over the shoulder of the tier — the way you see the knot as you make it. And when two or more ropes are involved, they are color coded so you can clearly tell them apart.

Included in addition are a section on decorative knots, a cross-reference list of the many applications of knots, and a detailed glossary. The Morrow Guide to Knots is a reliable and essential reference tool for all sportsmen and campers, homeowners, and youngsters as well.

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