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Peer Power: Preadolescent Culture and Identity

by

Peer Power: Preadolescent Culture and Identity Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

An engaging, fascinating, and important book.-Spencer Cahill, University of South FloridaAn in-depth and often sobering account of the social dynamics of childhood in the 1990s. This important study extends our knowledge of peer culture beyond the walls of classrooms into the day to day dilemmas of middle class children as they seek power and acceptance from their peers.-Donna Eder, author of School TalkAn excellent addition to a growing number of rich empirical studies of children's lives and peer cultures. The Adlers' study demonstrates the importance of entering children's worlds and gaining their perspectives for a new sociology of childhood.-William A. Corsaro, Indiana UniversityPeer Power explodes existing myths about children's friendships, power, and popularity, and the gender chasm between elementary school boys and girls. Based on eight years of intensive insider participant observation in their own children's community, the book discusses the vital components in the lives of preadolescents: popularity, friendships, cliques, social status, social isolation, loyalty, bullying, boy-girl relationships, and afterschool activities. It describes how friendships shift and change, how children are drawn into groups and excluded from them, how clique leaders maintain their power and popularity, and how the individuals' social experiences and feelings about themselves differ from the top of the pecking order to the bottom. The Adlers focus their attention on the peer culture of the children themselves and the way this culture extracts and modifies elements from adult culture.Children's peer culture, as it is nourished in those spaces where grownups cannot penetrate, stands between individual children and the larger adult society. As such, it is a mediator and shaper, influencing the way children collectively interpret their surroundings and deal with the common problems they face. The Adlers explore some of the patterns that develop in this social space, noting both the differences in the gendered cultures of boys and girls and their overlap into afterschool activities, role behavior, romantic inclinations, and social stratification.Peer culture shows the informal social mechanisms through which children create their social order, determine their place and identity, and develop positive and negative feelings about themselves.Patricia A. Adler is a professor of sociology at the University of Colorado. Peter Adler is a professor of sociology at the University of Denver. The Adlers have worked and written together for more than twenty-five years, producing ten books and more than fifty articles.

Synopsis:

.

Synopsis:

Peer Power explodes existing myths about children's friendships, power and popularity, and the gender chasm between elementary school boys and girls. Based on eight years of intensive insider participant observation in their own children's community, Peter and Patti Adler discuss the vital components of the lives of preadolescents: popularity, friendships, cliques, social status, social isolation, loyalty, bullying, boy-girl relationships, and afterschool activities. They describe how friendships shift and change, how people are drawn into groups and excluded from them, how clique leaders maintain their power and popularity, and how individuals' social experiences and feelings about themselves differ from the top of the pecking order to the bottom. In so doing, the Adlers focus their attention on the peer culture of the children themselves and the way this culture extracts and modifies elements from adult culture.

Children's peer culture, as it is nourished in those spaces where grownups cannot penetrate, stands between individual children and the larger adult society. As such, it is a mediator and shaper, influencing the way children collectively interpret their surroundings and deal with the common problems they face. The Adlers explore some of the patterns that develop in this social space, noting both the differences in boys' and girls' gendered cultures and the overlap in many social dynamics, afterschool activities, role behavior, romantic inclinations, and social stratification. For example, children's participation in adult-organized afterschool activities-a now-prominent feature of many American children's social experience-has profound implications for their socialization and development, moving them away from the negotiated, spontaneous character of play into the formal system of adult norms and values at ever-younger ages. When they retreat from adults, however, they still display distinctive peer group dynamics, forging strong ingroup/outgroup differentiation, loyalty, and identification.

Peer culture thus contains informal social mechanisms through which children create their social order, determine their place and identity, and develop positive and negative feelings about themselves. Studying children's peer culture is thus valuable, as it reveals not only how this subculture parallels the adult world but also how it differs from it.

Synopsis:

Children's peer culture, as it flourishes when adults are not present, stands between individual children and the larger adult society. Based on eight years of intensive insider participant observation in their own children's community, sociologists Peter and Patti Adler explode existing myths about children's friendships, power and popularity, and the gender chasm between elementary school boys and girls.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 231-246) and index.

About the Author

PATRICIA ADLER is a professor of sociology at the University of Colorado.

PETER ADLER is a professor of sociology at the University of Denver. The Adlers have worked and written together for more than twenty-five years, producing ten books and more than fifty articles

Product Details

ISBN:
9780813524603
With:
Adler, Peter
Author:
Adler, Peter
Author:
Adler, Patricia
Publisher:
Rutgers University Press
Location:
New Brunswick, N.J. :
Subject:
School Age
Subject:
Children
Subject:
Sociology - General
Subject:
Social networks
Subject:
Social interaction
Subject:
Peer Pressure
Subject:
Interpersonal relations in children
Subject:
Social interaction in children
Subject:
Children -- Social networks -- United States.
Subject:
Cliques (Sociology) -- United States.
Subject:
Peer pressure in children.
Subject:
Cliques
Subject:
Life Stages - School Age
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series Volume:
RNW-245
Publication Date:
19980131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 0.98 oz

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Child Psychology
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Children and Family
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
Science and Mathematics » Geology » Paleontology

Peer Power: Preadolescent Culture and Identity Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Rutgers University Press - English 9780813524603 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
.

"Synopsis" by ,
Peer Power explodes existing myths about children's friendships, power and popularity, and the gender chasm between elementary school boys and girls. Based on eight years of intensive insider participant observation in their own children's community, Peter and Patti Adler discuss the vital components of the lives of preadolescents: popularity, friendships, cliques, social status, social isolation, loyalty, bullying, boy-girl relationships, and afterschool activities. They describe how friendships shift and change, how people are drawn into groups and excluded from them, how clique leaders maintain their power and popularity, and how individuals' social experiences and feelings about themselves differ from the top of the pecking order to the bottom. In so doing, the Adlers focus their attention on the peer culture of the children themselves and the way this culture extracts and modifies elements from adult culture.

Children's peer culture, as it is nourished in those spaces where grownups cannot penetrate, stands between individual children and the larger adult society. As such, it is a mediator and shaper, influencing the way children collectively interpret their surroundings and deal with the common problems they face. The Adlers explore some of the patterns that develop in this social space, noting both the differences in boys' and girls' gendered cultures and the overlap in many social dynamics, afterschool activities, role behavior, romantic inclinations, and social stratification. For example, children's participation in adult-organized afterschool activities-a now-prominent feature of many American children's social experience-has profound implications for their socialization and development, moving them away from the negotiated, spontaneous character of play into the formal system of adult norms and values at ever-younger ages. When they retreat from adults, however, they still display distinctive peer group dynamics, forging strong ingroup/outgroup differentiation, loyalty, and identification.

Peer culture thus contains informal social mechanisms through which children create their social order, determine their place and identity, and develop positive and negative feelings about themselves. Studying children's peer culture is thus valuable, as it reveals not only how this subculture parallels the adult world but also how it differs from it.

"Synopsis" by , Children's peer culture, as it flourishes when adults are not present, stands between individual children and the larger adult society. Based on eight years of intensive insider participant observation in their own children's community, sociologists Peter and Patti Adler explode existing myths about children's friendships, power and popularity, and the gender chasm between elementary school boys and girls.
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