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Holocaust Memory Reframed: Museums and the Challenges of Representation

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Holocaust Memory Reframed: Museums and the Challenges of Representation Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Holocaust memorials and museums face a difficult task as their staffs strive to commemorate and document horror. On the one hand, the events museums represent are beyond most peopleandrsquo;s experiences.and#160; At the same time they are often portrayed by theologians, artists, and philosophers in ways that are already known by the public. Museum administrators and curators have the challenging role of finding a creative way to present Holocaust exhibits to avoid clichandeacute;d or dehumanizing portrayals of victims and their suffering.

In Holocaust Memory Reframed, Jennifer Hansen-Glucklich examines representations in three museums: Israelandrsquo;s Yad Vashem in Jerusalem, Germanyandrsquo;s Jewish Museum in Berlin, and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. She describes a variety of visually striking media, including architecture, photography exhibits, artifact displays, and video installations in order to explain the aesthetic techniques that the museums employ. As she interprets the exhibits, Hansen-Glucklich clarifies how museums communicate Holocaust narratives within the historical and cultural contexts specific to Germany, Israel, and the United States. In Yad Vashem, architect Moshe Safdie developed a narrative suited for Israel, rooted in a redemptive, Zionist story of homecoming to a place of mythic geography and renewal, in contrast to death and suffering in exile. In the Jewish Museum in Berlin, Daniel Libeskindandrsquo;s architecture, broken lines, and voids emphasize absence. Here exhibits communicate a conflicted ideology, torn between the loss of a Jewish past and the countryandrsquo;s current multicultural ethos. The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum presents yet another lens, conveying through its exhibits a sense of sacrifice that is part of the civil values of American democracy, and trying to overcome geographic and temporal distance. One well-know example, the pile of thousands of shoes plundered from concentration camp victims encourages the visitor to bridge the gap between viewer and victim.and#160;and#160;

Hansen-Glucklich explores how each museumandrsquo;s concept of the sacred shapes the design and choreography of visitorsandrsquo; experiences within museum spaces. These spaces are sites of pilgrimage that can in turn lead to rites of passage.

Synopsis:

In Holocaust Memory Reframed, Jennifer Hansen-Glucklich examines Holocaust representations in three museums: Israelandrsquo;s Yad Vashem in Jerusalem, Germanyandrsquo;s Jewish Museum in Berlin, and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. As she interprets the exhibits, Hansen-Glucklich clarifies how museums communicate Holocaust narratives within the historical and cultural contexts specific to Germany, Israel, and the United States.

Synopsis:

Arts organizations once sought patrons primarily from among the wealthy and well educated, but for many decades now they have revised their goals as they seek to broaden their audiences. Today, museums, orchestras, dance companies, theaters, and community cultural centers try to involve a variety of people in the arts. They strive to attract a more racially and ethnically diverse group of people, those from a broader range of economic backgrounds, new immigrants, families, and youth.

The chapters in this book draw on interviews with leaders, staff, volunteers, and audience members from eighty-five nonprofit cultural organizations to explore how they are trying to increase participation and the extent to which they have been successful. The insiders' accounts point to the opportunities and challenges involved in such efforts, from the reinvention of programs and creation of new activities, to the addition of new departments and staff dynamics, to partnerships with new groups. The authors differentiate between andquot;relationalandquot; and andquot;transactionalandquot; practices, the former term describing efforts to build connections with local communities and the latter describing efforts to create new consumer markets for cultural products. In both cases, arts leaders report that, although positive results are difficult to measure conclusively, long-term efforts bring better outcomes than short-term activities.

The organizations discussed include large, medium, and small nonprofits located in urban, suburban, and rural areasandmdash;from large institutions such as the Smithsonian, the Walker Art Center, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, and the San Francisco Symphony to many cultural organizations that are smaller, but often known nationally for their innovative work, such as AS220, The Loft Literary Center, Armory Center for the Arts, Appalshop, and the Western Folklife Center.

About the Author

and#160;JENNIFER HANSEN-GLUCKLICH teaches German language and literature in the department of Modern Foreign Languages at the University of Mary Washington. and#160;

Product Details

ISBN:
9780813563237
Subtitle:
Museums and the Challenges of Representation
Author:
Hansen-glucklich, Jennifer
Author:
Karraker, David
Author:
Grams, Diane
Author:
Norris, Wendy
Author:
Hansen-Glucklich, Jennifer
Author:
Fred, Morris
Author:
Joynes, D. Carroll
Author:
Farrell, Betty
Publisher:
Rutgers University Press
Subject:
Holocaust museum exhibits
Subject:
Jewish Museum in Berlin
Subject:
Holocaust Museum in Washington DC
Subject:
World History-Holocaust
Subject:
and#160;Jewish Museum in Berlin
Subject:
and#160;Holocaust Museum in Washington DC
Subject:
Public Policy
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Cloth
Series:
Rutgers Series: The Public Life of the Arts
Publication Date:
20140331
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Language:
English
Illustrations:
19
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » Museum Studies
History and Social Science » World History » Holocaust
Religion » Judaism » History

Holocaust Memory Reframed: Museums and the Challenges of Representation New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$29.95 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Rutgers University Press - English 9780813563237 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
In Holocaust Memory Reframed, Jennifer Hansen-Glucklich examines Holocaust representations in three museums: Israelandrsquo;s Yad Vashem in Jerusalem, Germanyandrsquo;s Jewish Museum in Berlin, and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. As she interprets the exhibits, Hansen-Glucklich clarifies how museums communicate Holocaust narratives within the historical and cultural contexts specific to Germany, Israel, and the United States.

"Synopsis" by ,
Arts organizations once sought patrons primarily from among the wealthy and well educated, but for many decades now they have revised their goals as they seek to broaden their audiences. Today, museums, orchestras, dance companies, theaters, and community cultural centers try to involve a variety of people in the arts. They strive to attract a more racially and ethnically diverse group of people, those from a broader range of economic backgrounds, new immigrants, families, and youth.

The chapters in this book draw on interviews with leaders, staff, volunteers, and audience members from eighty-five nonprofit cultural organizations to explore how they are trying to increase participation and the extent to which they have been successful. The insiders' accounts point to the opportunities and challenges involved in such efforts, from the reinvention of programs and creation of new activities, to the addition of new departments and staff dynamics, to partnerships with new groups. The authors differentiate between andquot;relationalandquot; and andquot;transactionalandquot; practices, the former term describing efforts to build connections with local communities and the latter describing efforts to create new consumer markets for cultural products. In both cases, arts leaders report that, although positive results are difficult to measure conclusively, long-term efforts bring better outcomes than short-term activities.

The organizations discussed include large, medium, and small nonprofits located in urban, suburban, and rural areasandmdash;from large institutions such as the Smithsonian, the Walker Art Center, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, and the San Francisco Symphony to many cultural organizations that are smaller, but often known nationally for their innovative work, such as AS220, The Loft Literary Center, Armory Center for the Arts, Appalshop, and the Western Folklife Center.

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