Murakami Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | August 18, 2014

Ian Leslie: IMG Empathic Curiosity



Today, we wonder anxiously if digital media is changing our brains. But if there's any time in history when our mental operations changed... Continue »
  1. $18.89 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$37.95
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
1 Remote Warehouse Art- General

This title in other editions

The Third Hand: Collaboration in Art from Conceptualism to Postmodernism

by

The Third Hand: Collaboration in Art from Conceptualism to Postmodernism Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Synopsis:

The lone artist is a worn cliché of art history but one that still defines how we think about the production of art. Since the 1960s, however, a number of artists have challenged this image by embarking on long-term collaborations that dramatically altered the terms of artistic identity. In The Third Hand, Charles Green offers a sustained critical examination of collaboration in international contemporary art, tracing its origins from the evolution of conceptual art in the 1960s into such stylistic labels as Earth Art, Systems Art, Body Art, and Performance Art. During this critical period, artists around the world began testing the limits of what art could be, how it might be produced, and who the artist is. Collaboration emerged as a prime way to reframe these questions.

Green looks at three distinct types of collaboration: the highly bureaucratic identities created by Joseph Kosuth, Ian Burn, Mel Ramsden, and other members of Art & Language in the late 1960s; the close-knit relationships based on marriage or lifetime partnership as practiced by the Boyle Family, Anne and Patrick Poirier, Helen Mayer Harrison and Newton Harrison; and couples-like Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Gilbert & George, or Marina Abramovi´c and Ulay-who developed third identities, effacing the individual artists almost entirely. These collaborations, Green contends, resulted in new and, at times, extreme authorial models that continue to inform current thinking about artistic identity and to illuminate the origins of postmodern art, suggesting, in the process, a new genealogy for art in the twenty-first century.

About the Author

Charles Green is an artist and a lecturer in the School of Art History and Theory at the University of New South Wales. He is the Australian correspondent for Artforum and author of Peripheral Vision: Contemporary Australian Art 1970–94 (1995).

Product Details

ISBN:
9780816637133
Author:
Green, Charles
Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
Subject:
General
Subject:
History - General
Subject:
Fine Arts
Subject:
Modernism (Art)
Subject:
Postmodernism
Subject:
Art - General
Subject:
General Art
Edition Description:
1
Publication Date:
20010231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
63 black-and-white photos
Pages:
268
Dimensions:
10 x 7 x 0.6 in

Other books you might like

  1. Against Fashion: Clothing as Art,... New Trade Paper $29.95
  2. Art of the Northwest Coast Used Trade Paper $14.00
  3. The Oxford Dictionary of American... New Hardcover $56.95
  4. Soviet Textiles: Designing the... New Trade Paper $23.95
  5. California Studies in the History of... Used Trade Paper $11.95
  6. Beauty and Art (Oxford History of Art) Used Trade Paper $9.95

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » General
Arts and Entertainment » Art » Mixed Media
History and Social Science » Politics » General

The Third Hand: Collaboration in Art from Conceptualism to Postmodernism New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$37.95 In Stock
Product details 268 pages University of Minnesota Press - English 9780816637133 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
The lone artist is a worn cliché of art history but one that still defines how we think about the production of art. Since the 1960s, however, a number of artists have challenged this image by embarking on long-term collaborations that dramatically altered the terms of artistic identity. In The Third Hand, Charles Green offers a sustained critical examination of collaboration in international contemporary art, tracing its origins from the evolution of conceptual art in the 1960s into such stylistic labels as Earth Art, Systems Art, Body Art, and Performance Art. During this critical period, artists around the world began testing the limits of what art could be, how it might be produced, and who the artist is. Collaboration emerged as a prime way to reframe these questions.

Green looks at three distinct types of collaboration: the highly bureaucratic identities created by Joseph Kosuth, Ian Burn, Mel Ramsden, and other members of Art & Language in the late 1960s; the close-knit relationships based on marriage or lifetime partnership as practiced by the Boyle Family, Anne and Patrick Poirier, Helen Mayer Harrison and Newton Harrison; and couples-like Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Gilbert & George, or Marina Abramovi´c and Ulay-who developed third identities, effacing the individual artists almost entirely. These collaborations, Green contends, resulted in new and, at times, extreme authorial models that continue to inform current thinking about artistic identity and to illuminate the origins of postmodern art, suggesting, in the process, a new genealogy for art in the twenty-first century.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.