Summer Reading Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | June 20, 2014

Lisa Howorth: IMG So Many Books, So Many Writers



I'm not a bookseller, but I'm married to one, and Square Books is a family. And we all know about families and how hard it is to disassociate... Continue »

spacer

On Order

$104.25
New Hardcover
Currently out of stock.
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Qty Store Section
- Local Warehouse Ethnic Studies- Immigration

Cosmopolitan Anxieties: Turkish Challenges to Citizenship and Belonging in Germany

by

Cosmopolitan Anxieties: Turkish Challenges to Citizenship and Belonging in Germany Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In Cosmopolitan Anxieties, Ruth Mandel explores Germany’s relation to the more than two million Turkish immigrants and their descendants living within its borders. Based on her two decades of ethnographic research in Berlin, she argues that Germany’s reactions to the postwar Turkish diaspora have been charged, inconsistent, and resonant of past problematic encounters with a Jewish “other.” Mandel examines the tensions in Germany between race-based ideologies of blood and belonging on the one hand and ambitions of multicultural tolerance and cosmopolitanism on the other. She does so by juxtaposing the experiences of Turkish immigrants, Jews, and “ethnic Germans” in relation to issues including Islam, Germany’s Nazi past, and its radically altered position as a unified country in the post–Cold War era.

Mandel explains that within Germany the popular understanding of what it means to be German is often conflated with citizenship, so that a German citizen of Turkish background can never be a “real German.” This conflation of blood and citizenship was dramatically illustrated when, during the 1990s, nearly two million “ethnic Germans” from Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union arrived in Germany with a legal and social status far superior to that of “Turks” who had lived in the country for decades. Mandel analyzes how representations of Turkish difference are appropriated or rejected by Turks living in Germany; how subsequent generations of Turkish immigrants are exploring new configurations of identity and citizenship through literature, film, hip-hop, and fashion; and how migrants returning to Turkey find themselves fundamentally changed by their experiences in Germany. She maintains that until difference is accepted as unproblematic, there will continue to be serious tension regarding resident foreigners, despite recurrent attempts to realize a more inclusive and “demotic” cosmopolitan vision of Germany.

Synopsis:

"Ruth Mandel has turned the long trajectory of her journey through the jostling identities of Turk, Muslim, Alevi, German, Jew, and American--often introspective, always nuanced, and richly painted with intense, intimate, and many-hued detail--into an intricate and yet lucid masterpiece of analytic as well as ethnographic dexterity. In the condescension of a well-meaning Berlin cultural elite toward the 'demotic cosmopolitanism' of the immigrants, and in the scream of irrepressible disgust evoked by the touch of an alien-seeming strand of hair, she gracefully but inexorably traces the lingering miasma of submerged or weakly confronted intolerance and challenges us to search out its traces in our own cultural milieu as well."--Michael Herzfeld, author of "The Body Impolitic: Artisans and Artifice in the Global Hierarchy of Value"

Synopsis:

"Ruth Mandel's study of the Turks of Germany is perhaps the most important single book yet written examining the complexity and contradictions of the Muslims in today's Europe. Looking at the various communities (Turks, Alevis, and Kurds) that make up the Turkish presence in Germany and delineating the complexity of a German identity after the Shoah and German reunification as the background to the debates about these Islamic presences, Mandel is able to provide first-hand, sophisticated answers to the most troubling questions about the shifting world of Islam in Europe. A study that will quickly become a classic for any examination of Europe and Islam."--Sander L. Gilman, author of "Multiculturalism and the Jews"

Synopsis:

An anthropological history that traces shifts in 1990s German immigration policy regarding those within the Turkish diaspora, along with portraying the lives of Turkish immigrants.

About the Author

“In Cosmopolitan Anxieties, Ruth Mandel successfully conveys the particularities of Turkish experience in the German milieu as she moves across a variety of topics, including citizenship, cultural identity, religion, transnationalism, urbanism, and racism.”—Kevin Robins, author of The Challenge of Transcultural Diversities: Cultural Policy and Cultural Diversity
“Ruth Mandel has turned the long trajectory of her journey through the jostling identities of Turk, Muslim, Alevi, German, Jew, and American—often introspective, always nuanced, and richly painted with intense, intimate, and many-hued detail—into an intricate and yet lucid masterpiece of analytic as well as ethnographic dexterity. In the condescension of a well-meaning Berlin cultural elite toward the ‘demotic cosmopolitanism’ of the immigrants, and in the scream of irrepressible disgust evoked by the touch of an alien-seeming strand of hair, she gracefully but inexorably traces the lingering miasma of submerged or weakly confronted intolerance and challenges us to search out its traces in our own cultural milieu as well.”—Michael Herzfeld, author of The Body Impolitic: Artisans and Artifice in the Global Hierarchy of Value
“Ruth Mandel’s study of the Turks of Germany is perhaps the most important single book yet written examining the complexity and contradictions of the Muslims in today’s Europe. Looking at the various communities (Turks, Alevis, and Kurds) that make up the Turkish presence in Germany and delineating the complexity of a German identity after the Shoah and German reunification as the background to the debates about these Islamic presences, Mandel is able to provide first-hand, sophisticated answers to the most troubling questions about the shifting world of Islam in Europe. A study that will quickly become a classic for any examination of Europe and Islam.”—Sander L. Gilman, author of Multiculturalism and the Jews

Product Details

ISBN:
9780822341765
Author:
Mandel, Ruth
Publisher:
Duke University Press
Subject:
Citizenship
Subject:
Germany
Subject:
Minority Studies - General
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - General
Subject:
Citizenship -- Germany.
Subject:
Germany Ethnic relations.
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Ethnic Studies-Immigration
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20080731
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
25 illustrations
Pages:
440
Dimensions:
9.51x6.58x1.24 in. 1.66 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. A Community Under Siege: The Jews of... New Hardcover $68.95
  2. The Discovery of France: A...
    Used Trade Paper $10.00
  3. Immigration and the Transformation... New Trade Paper $77.50
  4. Italian Film in the Light of... Used Trade Paper $28.00

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Immigration
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Racism and Ethnic Conflict

Cosmopolitan Anxieties: Turkish Challenges to Citizenship and Belonging in Germany New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$104.25 Backorder
Product details 440 pages Duke University Press - English 9780822341765 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "Ruth Mandel has turned the long trajectory of her journey through the jostling identities of Turk, Muslim, Alevi, German, Jew, and American--often introspective, always nuanced, and richly painted with intense, intimate, and many-hued detail--into an intricate and yet lucid masterpiece of analytic as well as ethnographic dexterity. In the condescension of a well-meaning Berlin cultural elite toward the 'demotic cosmopolitanism' of the immigrants, and in the scream of irrepressible disgust evoked by the touch of an alien-seeming strand of hair, she gracefully but inexorably traces the lingering miasma of submerged or weakly confronted intolerance and challenges us to search out its traces in our own cultural milieu as well."--Michael Herzfeld, author of "The Body Impolitic: Artisans and Artifice in the Global Hierarchy of Value"
"Synopsis" by , "Ruth Mandel's study of the Turks of Germany is perhaps the most important single book yet written examining the complexity and contradictions of the Muslims in today's Europe. Looking at the various communities (Turks, Alevis, and Kurds) that make up the Turkish presence in Germany and delineating the complexity of a German identity after the Shoah and German reunification as the background to the debates about these Islamic presences, Mandel is able to provide first-hand, sophisticated answers to the most troubling questions about the shifting world of Islam in Europe. A study that will quickly become a classic for any examination of Europe and Islam."--Sander L. Gilman, author of "Multiculturalism and the Jews"
"Synopsis" by ,
An anthropological history that traces shifts in 1990s German immigration policy regarding those within the Turkish diaspora, along with portraying the lives of Turkish immigrants.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.