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A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition

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A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"Sean Hemingway's new edition tucks a variant draft of that chapter, now called 'Winters in Schruns', farther up in the book, just ahead of the long-familiar three-part portrait of F. Scott Fitzgerald, so its effect seems diffuse.

There may be a valid chronological reason for closing the book with Hemingway's reflections on Fitzgerald, but the final, sendoff tone is far less effective or emotion-stirring than the original. Hemingway never came up with a satisfactory ending for the book, his grandson says.

'Although this manuscript lacks a final chapter,' Sean Hemingway writes in the introduction, 'I believe that it provides a truer representation of the book my grandfather intended to publish.'" Steve Paul, The Kansas City Star (read the entire Kansas City Star review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

When Ernest Hemingway died in 1961 he had nearly completed A Moveable Feast, which eventually was published posthumously in 1964 and edited by his widow Mary Hemingway.

This new special edition of Hemingway's classic memoir of his early years in Paris in the 1920s presents the original manuscript as the author intended it to be published at the time of his death. This new publication also includes a number of unfinished Paris sketches on writing and experiences that Hemingway had with his son, Jack, his wife Hadley, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ford Maddox Ford, and others. A personal foreword by Patrick Hemingway, Ernest's sole surviving son, precedes an introduction by the editor, Sean Hemingway, grandson of the author.

It is a literary feast, brilliantly evoking the exuberant mood of Paris after World War I and the youthful spirit, unbridled creativity, and unquenchable enthusiasm that Hemingway himself epitomized.

Review:

"[T]he 'restored' edition [is] ably and attractively produced by Patrick and Seán Hemingway....The new story 'A Strange Fight Club' is well worth having, too." Christopher Hitchens, The Atlantic Monthly

Synopsis:

Published posthumously in 1964, A Moveable Feast remains one of Ernest Hemingway's most beloved works. It is his classic memoir of Paris in the 1920s, filled with irreverent portraits of other expatriate luminaries such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein; tender memories of his first wife, Hadley; and insightful recollections of his own early experiments with his craft. It is a literary feast, brilliantly evoking the exuberant mood of Paris after World War I and the youthful spirit, unbridled creativity, and unquenchable enthusiasm that Hemingway himself epitomized.

Synopsis:

Published for the first time as Ernest Hemingway intended, one of the great writer’s most beloved and enduring works: his classic memoir of Paris in the 1920s.

Published  posthumously  in  1964,A  Moveable  Feast remains  one  of  Ernest  Hemingway’s  most  beloved works.   Since   Hemingway’s   personal   papers   were released  in  1979,  scholars  have  examined  and  debated  the changes made to the text before publication. Now, this spe- cial restored edition presents the original manuscript as the author intended it to be published.

Featuring a personal Foreword by Patrick Hemingway, Ernest’s sole surviving son, and an Introduction by the editor and grandson of the author, Sean Hemingway, this new edi- tion also includes a number of unfinished, never-before-pub- lished Paris sketches revealing experiences that Hemingway had with his son, Jack, and his first wife Hadley. Also included are irreverent portraits of other literary luminaries, such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ford Maddox Ford, and insightful recollections of Hemingway’s own early experiments with his craft.

Sure to excite critics and readers alike, the restored edition of A Moveable Feast brilliantly evokes the exuberant mood of Paris after World War I and the unbridled creativity and unquenchable enthusiasm that Hemingway himself epitomized.

 

Synopsis:

andlt;bandgt;Published for the first time as Ernest Hemingway intended, one of the great writerand#8217;s most beloved and enduring works: his classic memoir of Paris in the 1920s.andlt;/bandgt;andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Publishedandnbsp; posthumouslyandnbsp; inandnbsp; 1964,andlt;iandgt;Aandnbsp; Moveableandnbsp; Feastandlt;/iandgt; remainsandnbsp; oneandnbsp; ofandnbsp; Ernestandnbsp; Hemingwayand#8217;sandnbsp; mostandnbsp; beloved works.andnbsp;andnbsp; Sinceandnbsp;andnbsp; Hemingwayand#8217;sandnbsp;andnbsp; personalandnbsp;andnbsp; papersandnbsp;andnbsp; were releasedandnbsp; inandnbsp; 1979,andnbsp; scholarsandnbsp; haveandnbsp; examinedandnbsp; andandnbsp; debatedandnbsp; the changes made to the text before publication. Now, this spe- cial restored edition presents the original manuscript as the author intended it to be published.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Featuring a personal Foreword by Patrick Hemingway, Ernestand#8217;s sole surviving son, and an Introduction by the editor and grandson of the author, Sean Hemingway, this new edi- tion also includes a number of unfinished, never-before-pub- lished Paris sketches revealing experiences that Hemingway had with his son, Jack, and his first wife Hadley. Also included are irreverent portraits of other literary luminaries, such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ford Maddox Ford, and insightful recollections of Hemingwayand#8217;s own early experiments with his craft.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Sure to excite critics and readers alike, the restored edition of andlt;iandgt;A Moveable Feastandlt;/iandgt; brilliantly evokes the exuberant mood of Paris after World War I and the unbridled creativity and unquenchable enthusiasm that Hemingway himself epitomized.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;andnbsp;

About the Author

Ernest Hemingway did more to change the style of English prose than any other writer of his time. Publication of The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms immediately established Hemingway as one of the greatest literary lights of the twentieth century. As part of the expatriate community in 1920s Paris, the former journalist and World War I ambulance driver began a career that led to international fame. Hemingway was an aficionado of bullfighting and big-game hunting, and his main protagonists were always men and women of courage and conviction who suffered unseen scars, both physical and emotional.  He covered the Spanish Civil War, portraying it in the novel For Whom the Bell Tolls, and he also covered World War II.  His classic novella The Old Man and the Sea won the Pulitzer Prize in 1953. Hemingway was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1954. He died in 1961.

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ellafitzgerald, July 20, 2009 (view all comments by ellafitzgerald)
(from the New York Times, July 20, 2009)

Don’t Touch ‘A Moveable Feast’

By A. E. HOTCHNER
Published: July 19, 2009
Westport, Conn.


BOOKSTORES are getting shipments of a significantly changed edition of Ernest Hemingway’s masterpiece, “A Moveable Feast,” first published posthumously by Scribner in 1964. This new edition, also published by Scribner, has been extensively reworked by a grandson who doesn’t like what the original said about his grandmother, Hemingway’s second wife.

The grandson has removed several sections of the book’s final chapter and replaced them with other writing of Hemingway’s that the grandson feels paints his grandma in a more sympathetic light. Ten other chapters that roused the grandson’s displeasure have been relegated to an appendix, thereby, according to the grandson, creating “a truer representation of the book my grandfather intended to publish.”

It is his claim that Mary Hemingway, Ernest’s fourth wife, cobbled the manuscript together from shards of an unfinished work and that she created the final chapter, “There Is Never Any End to Paris.”

Scribner’s involvement with this bowdlerized version should be examined as it relates to the book’s actual genesis, and to the ethics of publishing.

In 1956, Ernest and I were having lunch at the Ritz in Paris with Charles Ritz, the hotel’s chairman, when Charley asked if Ernest was aware that a trunk of his was in the basement storage room, left there in 1930. Ernest did not remember storing the trunk but he did recall that in the 1920s Louis Vuitton had made a special trunk for him. Ernest had wondered what had become of it.

Charley had the trunk brought up to his office, and after lunch Ernest opened it. It was filled with a ragtag collection of clothes, menus, receipts, memos, hunting and fishing paraphernalia, skiing equipment, racing forms, correspondence and, on the bottom, something that elicited a joyful reaction from Ernest: “The notebooks! So that’s where they were! Enfin!”

There were two stacks of lined notebooks like the ones used by schoolchildren in Paris when he lived there in the ’20s. Ernest had filled them with his careful handwriting while sitting in his favorite café, nursing a café crème. The notebooks described the places, the people, the events of his penurious life.

When Ernest returned to Cuba in 1957, he had Nita, his sometime secretary, type the stories on double-spaced pages to make them easy to edit. When I visited the Hemingways in Ketchum, Idaho, in the fall of 1958, Ernest was at work on what he called “my Paris book.” He gave me several chapters to read. In 1959, when we were in Spain following the great matadors Antonio Ordóñez and Dominguín, Ernest often worked on the Paris manuscript on the days when there wasn’t a bullfight.

Back in Cuba, he suspended work on it to write “The Dangerous Summer,” about those bullfights, for Life magazine. But instead of the contracted 40,000 words, he wrote 108,746 and asked me to go to Cuba to help him pare down his manuscript.

When I was leaving for New York to give the manuscript to the editor of Life, Ernest also gave me the completed manuscript of the Paris book to give to Scribner’s president, Charles Scribner Jr.

I recount this history of “A Moveable Feast” to demonstrate how involved Ernest was with it, and that the manuscript was not left in shards but was ready for publication. Ernest died before the publication of the book could go forward. When I visited him in the Mayo Clinic a few months before his dementia led to his suicide, he was very concerned about his Paris book, and worried that it needed a final sentence, which it did not.

After his death, Mary, as executor, decided that Scribner should proceed with the publication. Harry Brague was the editor. I met with him several times while the book was in galleys.

Because Mary was busy with matters relating to Ernest’s estate, she had little involvement with the book. However, she did call me about its title. Scribner was going to call it “Paris Sketches,” but Mary hoped I could come up with something more compelling. I ran through a few possibilities, but none resonated until I recalled that Ernest had once referred to Paris as a moveable feast. Mary and Scribner were delighted with that, but they wanted attribution. I wrote down what Ernest had said to the best of my recollection, and this appears on the title page attributed to a “friend,” which is the way I wanted it.

These details are evidence that the book was a serious work that Ernest finished with his usual intensity, and that he certainly intended it for publication. What I read on the plane coming back from Cuba was essentially what was published. There was no extra chapter created by Mary.

As an author, I am concerned by Scribner’s involvement in this “restored edition.” With this reworking as a precedent, what will Scribner do, for instance, if a descendant of F. Scott Fitzgerald demands the removal of the chapter in “A Moveable Feast” about the size of Fitzgerald’s penis, or if Ford Madox Ford’s grandson wants to delete references to his ancestor’s body odor.

All publishers, Scribner included, are guardians of the books that authors entrust to them. Someone who inherits an author’s copyright is not entitled to amend his work. There is always the possibility that the inheritor could write his own book offering his own corrections.

Ernest was very protective of the words he wrote, words that gave the literary world a new style of writing. Surely he has the right to have these words protected against frivolous incursion, like this reworked volume that should be called “A Moveable Book.” I hope the Authors Guild is paying attention.

A. E. Hotchner is the author of the memoirs “Papa Hemingway” and “King of the Hill.”
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781416591313
Author:
Hemingway, Ernest
Publisher:
Scribner Book Company
Illustrator:
Hemingway, Sean
Foreword by:
Hemingway, Patrick
Foreword:
Hemingway, Patrick
Editor:
Hemingway, Sean
Author:
Hemingway, Sean
Author:
Hemingway, Patrick
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
General Biography
Subject:
Novelists, American -- 20th century.
Subject:
Paris (France) Intellectual life.
Subject:
Biography-Literary
Subject:
Paris, left bank, Gertrude stein, posthumous publication, f. scott fitzgerald, Algonquin round table, ford Maddox ford, ezra pound, james joyce, memoir, Shakespeare and company, a.e. hotchner, Hadley, Maxwell perkins, expat, mary hemingway
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
July 2009
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
2 8-p inserts
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
8.44 x 5.5 in 15.575 oz

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Biography » Literary
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy

A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$25.00 In Stock
Product details 256 pages Scribner Book Company - English 9781416591313 Reviews:
"Review A Day" by , "Sean Hemingway's new edition tucks a variant draft of that chapter, now called 'Winters in Schruns', farther up in the book, just ahead of the long-familiar three-part portrait of F. Scott Fitzgerald, so its effect seems diffuse.

There may be a valid chronological reason for closing the book with Hemingway's reflections on Fitzgerald, but the final, sendoff tone is far less effective or emotion-stirring than the original. Hemingway never came up with a satisfactory ending for the book, his grandson says.

'Although this manuscript lacks a final chapter,' Sean Hemingway writes in the introduction, 'I believe that it provides a truer representation of the book my grandfather intended to publish.'" Steve Paul, The Kansas City Star (read the entire Kansas City Star review)

"Review" by , "[T]he 'restored' edition [is] ably and attractively produced by Patrick and Seán Hemingway....The new story 'A Strange Fight Club' is well worth having, too."
"Synopsis" by , Published posthumously in 1964, A Moveable Feast remains one of Ernest Hemingway's most beloved works. It is his classic memoir of Paris in the 1920s, filled with irreverent portraits of other expatriate luminaries such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein; tender memories of his first wife, Hadley; and insightful recollections of his own early experiments with his craft. It is a literary feast, brilliantly evoking the exuberant mood of Paris after World War I and the youthful spirit, unbridled creativity, and unquenchable enthusiasm that Hemingway himself epitomized.
"Synopsis" by , Published for the first time as Ernest Hemingway intended, one of the great writer’s most beloved and enduring works: his classic memoir of Paris in the 1920s.

Published  posthumously  in  1964,A  Moveable  Feast remains  one  of  Ernest  Hemingway’s  most  beloved works.   Since   Hemingway’s   personal   papers   were released  in  1979,  scholars  have  examined  and  debated  the changes made to the text before publication. Now, this spe- cial restored edition presents the original manuscript as the author intended it to be published.

Featuring a personal Foreword by Patrick Hemingway, Ernest’s sole surviving son, and an Introduction by the editor and grandson of the author, Sean Hemingway, this new edi- tion also includes a number of unfinished, never-before-pub- lished Paris sketches revealing experiences that Hemingway had with his son, Jack, and his first wife Hadley. Also included are irreverent portraits of other literary luminaries, such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ford Maddox Ford, and insightful recollections of Hemingway’s own early experiments with his craft.

Sure to excite critics and readers alike, the restored edition of A Moveable Feast brilliantly evokes the exuberant mood of Paris after World War I and the unbridled creativity and unquenchable enthusiasm that Hemingway himself epitomized.

 

"Synopsis" by , andlt;bandgt;Published for the first time as Ernest Hemingway intended, one of the great writerand#8217;s most beloved and enduring works: his classic memoir of Paris in the 1920s.andlt;/bandgt;andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Publishedandnbsp; posthumouslyandnbsp; inandnbsp; 1964,andlt;iandgt;Aandnbsp; Moveableandnbsp; Feastandlt;/iandgt; remainsandnbsp; oneandnbsp; ofandnbsp; Ernestandnbsp; Hemingwayand#8217;sandnbsp; mostandnbsp; beloved works.andnbsp;andnbsp; Sinceandnbsp;andnbsp; Hemingwayand#8217;sandnbsp;andnbsp; personalandnbsp;andnbsp; papersandnbsp;andnbsp; were releasedandnbsp; inandnbsp; 1979,andnbsp; scholarsandnbsp; haveandnbsp; examinedandnbsp; andandnbsp; debatedandnbsp; the changes made to the text before publication. Now, this spe- cial restored edition presents the original manuscript as the author intended it to be published.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Featuring a personal Foreword by Patrick Hemingway, Ernestand#8217;s sole surviving son, and an Introduction by the editor and grandson of the author, Sean Hemingway, this new edi- tion also includes a number of unfinished, never-before-pub- lished Paris sketches revealing experiences that Hemingway had with his son, Jack, and his first wife Hadley. Also included are irreverent portraits of other literary luminaries, such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ford Maddox Ford, and insightful recollections of Hemingwayand#8217;s own early experiments with his craft.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Sure to excite critics and readers alike, the restored edition of andlt;iandgt;A Moveable Feastandlt;/iandgt; brilliantly evokes the exuberant mood of Paris after World War I and the unbridled creativity and unquenchable enthusiasm that Hemingway himself epitomized.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;andnbsp;
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