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Miko Kings: An Indian Baseball Story

by

Miko Kings: An Indian Baseball Story Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Miko Kings is set in Indian Territory's queen city, Ada, Oklahoma, during the baseball fever of 1907, but moves back and forth from 1969, during the Vietnam War, to present-day Ada. The story focuses on an Indian baseball team but brings a new understanding of the term "America's favorite pastime." For tribes in Indian Territory, baseball was an extension of a sport they'd been playing for centuries before their forced removal to Indian Territory.

The story centers on the lives of Hope Little Leader, a Choctaw pitcher for the Miko Kings, and Ezol Day, a postal clerk in Indian Territory who travels forward in time to tell stories to our present-day narrator. With Day’s help, the narrator pulls us into Indian boarding schools, such as the historical Hampton Normal School for Blacks and Indians in Virginia, where the novel’s legendary love story between Justina Maurepas—a character modeled after an influential Black educator—and Hope Little Leader, begins.

Though a lively and humorous work of fiction, the narrative draws heavily on LeAnne Howe’s careful historical research. She weaves original and fictive documents into the text, such as newspaper clippings, photographs, typewritten letters, and handwritten journal entries.

"LeAnne Howe's Miko Kings is an incredible act of recovery: baseball, a sport jealously guarded by mainstream Anglo culture, is also rooted in Native American history and territory...[Howe's] compelling stories and narratives...expose the political games of the 20th century that Native Americans learned to play for resistance and survival."—Rigoberto González, author (So Often the Pitcher Goes to Water Until It Breaks and Butterfly Boy)LeAnne Howe, an enrolled member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, is an author, playwright, and scholar. Born and educated in Oklahoma, she has read and lectured throughout the United States, Japan, and the Middle East. Her first novel, Shell Shaker, earned her a 2002 American Book Award and a Wordcraft Circle Writer of the Year in Creative Prose award. In 2004, Shell Shaker was published in French. Howe is a recipient of a National Endowment for the Humanities award for research and a Smithsonian Native American internship for research. She has written and directed for theater, radio, and film. Her most recent film project as the narrator/host of Spiral of Fire aired on PBS in the fall of 2006. She is currently an associate professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

 

Synopsis:

The game isn't over till it's over.

Synopsis:

Fiction. MIKO KINGS is set in an Indian Territory's queen city, Ada, Oklahoma, during the baseball fever of 1903 and simutaneously in 1969, the Vietname era. Though a lively and humorous contemporary work of fiction, the narration draws heavily on LeAnne Howe's careful historical research: boarding schools for Native American children, Native American participation in the Vietnam War, and--most centrally--the story of the little-known Indian Baseball League of the late 1800s and 1900s. LeAnne Howe, an enrolled member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, is an author, playwright, and scholar. "This is where twentieth-century Indian really began... not in the abstractions of congressional acts, but on the prairie diamond"--Henri Day.

Synopsis:

"This is where the twentieth-century Indian really began . . . not in the abstractions of congressional acts, but on the prairie diamond."-Henri Day

Miko Kingsis set in Indian Territory's queen city, Ada, Oklahoma, during the baseball fever of 1903 and simultaneously in 1969, the Vietnam era. The story centers on the lives of Hope Little Leader, a Choctaw pitcher for the Miko Kings baseball team; Lucius Mummy, a switch hitter; and Ezol Daggs, the postal clerk in Indian Territory. It is Daggs who, in attempting to patent her Choctaw theory of relativity, inadvertently changes the course of history for the Indians and their baseball team.

Though a lively and humorous contemporary work of fiction, the narration draws heavily on LeAnne Howe's careful historical research: boarding schools for Native American children, Native American participation in the Vietnam War, and-most centrally-the story of the little-known Indian Baseball League of the late 1800s and early 1900s.

LeAnne Howe, an enrolled member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, is an author, playwright, and scholar. Born and educated in Oklahoma, she has read and lectured throughout the United States, Japan, and the Middle East. Her first novel, Shell Shaker, earned her a 2002 American Book Award and a Wordcraft Circle Writer of the Year in Creative Prose award. In 2004, Shell Shakerwas published in French.

Howe is a recipient of a National Endowment for the Humanities award for research and a Smithsonian Native American internship for research. She has written and directed for theater, radio, and film. Her most recent film project as the narrator/host of Spiral of Fireaired on PBS in the fall of 2006. She is currently an associate professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

About the Author

LeAnne Howe, a citizen of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, was the screenwriter for Indian Country Diaries: Spiral of Fire, a 90-minute PBS documentary released in November 2006. Howe's first novel, Shell Shaker (Aunt Lute Books, 2001), received an American Book Award in 2002. Howe is Associate Professor and Interim Director of American Indian Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781879960787
Author:
Howe, Leanne
Publisher:
Aunt Lute Books
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Choctaw Indians
Subject:
Ada (Okla.)
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
Sports
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20071031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
206
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.6 x 0.7 in 11 oz

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » Native American » General Native American Studies
Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Baseball » General

Miko Kings: An Indian Baseball Story New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$11.95 In Stock
Product details 206 pages Aunt Lute Books - English 9781879960787 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
The game isn't over till it's over.
"Synopsis" by , Fiction. MIKO KINGS is set in an Indian Territory's queen city, Ada, Oklahoma, during the baseball fever of 1903 and simutaneously in 1969, the Vietname era. Though a lively and humorous contemporary work of fiction, the narration draws heavily on LeAnne Howe's careful historical research: boarding schools for Native American children, Native American participation in the Vietnam War, and--most centrally--the story of the little-known Indian Baseball League of the late 1800s and 1900s. LeAnne Howe, an enrolled member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, is an author, playwright, and scholar. "This is where twentieth-century Indian really began... not in the abstractions of congressional acts, but on the prairie diamond"--Henri Day.
"Synopsis" by , "This is where the twentieth-century Indian really began . . . not in the abstractions of congressional acts, but on the prairie diamond."-Henri Day

Miko Kingsis set in Indian Territory's queen city, Ada, Oklahoma, during the baseball fever of 1903 and simultaneously in 1969, the Vietnam era. The story centers on the lives of Hope Little Leader, a Choctaw pitcher for the Miko Kings baseball team; Lucius Mummy, a switch hitter; and Ezol Daggs, the postal clerk in Indian Territory. It is Daggs who, in attempting to patent her Choctaw theory of relativity, inadvertently changes the course of history for the Indians and their baseball team.

Though a lively and humorous contemporary work of fiction, the narration draws heavily on LeAnne Howe's careful historical research: boarding schools for Native American children, Native American participation in the Vietnam War, and-most centrally-the story of the little-known Indian Baseball League of the late 1800s and early 1900s.

LeAnne Howe, an enrolled member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, is an author, playwright, and scholar. Born and educated in Oklahoma, she has read and lectured throughout the United States, Japan, and the Middle East. Her first novel, Shell Shaker, earned her a 2002 American Book Award and a Wordcraft Circle Writer of the Year in Creative Prose award. In 2004, Shell Shakerwas published in French.

Howe is a recipient of a National Endowment for the Humanities award for research and a Smithsonian Native American internship for research. She has written and directed for theater, radio, and film. Her most recent film project as the narrator/host of Spiral of Fireaired on PBS in the fall of 2006. She is currently an associate professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

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