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Taken at the Flood: The Roman Conquest of Greece (Ancient Warfare and Civilization)

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Taken at the Flood: The Roman Conquest of Greece (Ancient Warfare and Civilization) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"Is there anyone on earth who is so narrow-minded or uninquisitive that he could fail to want to know how and thanks to what kind of political system almost the entire known world was conquered and brought under a single empire, in less than fifty-three years-an unprecedented event?" --Polybius, Histories

The 53-year period Polybius had in mind, counting inclusively, stretched from the start of the Second Punic War in 219 B.C.E. until 167, when Rome, at last, overthrew the Macedonian monarchy and divided it into four independent republics. Until now, this critical period of history has been overshadowed by the events of the Hannibalic war, but equally important to Rome's rise to dominance was its defeat of Macedon, its superpower neighbor to the east.

Taken at the Flood chronicles the momentous activity and expansion by Rome into the Greek east, with an epilogue on the infamous destruction of Corinth in 146. Though focused primarily on Rome's eastern imperialism, the book's narrative takes into account Rome's concurrent western conflicts, most notably with Hannibal, as these influenced its strategy in Greece. Robin Waterfield interweaves other topics and themes into his history, such as cultural developments in literature, the Roman aristocratic ethos, and the tactics employed by the two best fighting machines the ancient world ever produced: the Macedonian phalanx and Roman legion.

Elegant and absorbing, Taken at the Flood is a dynamic narrative of an unjustly forgotten war in ancient history.

Review:

"In general, there are several go-to topics in Roman history that invariably prove the most popular, regardless of audience or historical moment: Rome's efficient politics, charismatic leaders, inexorable decline, and a smattering of made-for-TV battles are too good to resist. The relatively slow, borderline obscure, subjugation of the Macedonian Empire decades before the birth of Julius Caesar, however, hardly stirs the popular imagination. Yet, as independent scholar and translator Waterfield (Dividing the Spoils) cogently and convincingly argues, perhaps no other action was more important in allowing Rome to become Rome (it's the famous defeat of Hannibal that usually gets the nod). But when Macedon finally fell, the bustling Mediterranean world was Rome's for the taking. Waterfield makes Roman imperialism central to his narrative, demonstrating again and again how exceptionally aggressive Rome was for its age, the subtle execution its policies notwithstanding. On top of producing a traditional academic history, Waterfield has composed a stimulating and provocative meditation on imperialism itself, both in antiquity and in our own society." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Robin Waterfield is an independent scholar, living in southern Greece. In addition to more than twenty-five translations of works of Greek literature, he is the author of numerous books, most recently Dividing the Spoils: The War for Alexander the Great's Empire.

Table of Contents

Contents

Preface

Acknowledgements

List of Illustrations

Maps

Prelude: Clouds in the West

1. Rome Turns East

2. The Illyrian Wars

3. Barbarians, Go Home!

4. King Philip of Macedon

5. The Freedom of the Greeks

6. The Road to Thermopylae

7. The Periphery Expands

8. Remote Control

9. Perseus' Choice

10. The End of Macedon

11. Imperium Romanum

12. The Greek World after Pydna

Key Dates

Glossary

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780199916894
Author:
Waterfield, Robin
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Subject:
Ancient - Rome
Subject:
Classical Studies | Ancient History | Roman
Subject:
World History-Ancient Near East
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20140431
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
25 b/w illus.
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
6.5 x 9.3 x 1.1 in 1.3 lb

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » World History » Ancient Near East

Taken at the Flood: The Roman Conquest of Greece (Ancient Warfare and Civilization) New Hardcover
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Product details 320 pages Oxford University Press, USA - English 9780199916894 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In general, there are several go-to topics in Roman history that invariably prove the most popular, regardless of audience or historical moment: Rome's efficient politics, charismatic leaders, inexorable decline, and a smattering of made-for-TV battles are too good to resist. The relatively slow, borderline obscure, subjugation of the Macedonian Empire decades before the birth of Julius Caesar, however, hardly stirs the popular imagination. Yet, as independent scholar and translator Waterfield (Dividing the Spoils) cogently and convincingly argues, perhaps no other action was more important in allowing Rome to become Rome (it's the famous defeat of Hannibal that usually gets the nod). But when Macedon finally fell, the bustling Mediterranean world was Rome's for the taking. Waterfield makes Roman imperialism central to his narrative, demonstrating again and again how exceptionally aggressive Rome was for its age, the subtle execution its policies notwithstanding. On top of producing a traditional academic history, Waterfield has composed a stimulating and provocative meditation on imperialism itself, both in antiquity and in our own society." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
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