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Ten Billion

by

Ten Billion Cover

ISBN13: 9780345806475
ISBN10: 0345806476
All Product Details

 

Awards

Staff Pick

This is the most terrifying book ever about overpopulation and the impending environmental horrors! Think 7 billion people is a strain on natural resources? Trying to feed 10 billion would deforest the entire planet and consume every drop of fresh water available... and current population growth figures, if left unchecked, lead experts to believe the population could hit 28 billion by 2100! Forget the economy, forget politics, forget religious objections — if we don't take drastic action now(!!) regarding overpopulation, carbon emissions, deforestation, and water use, I feel Stephen Emmott's concluding sentence will inevitably be true: "We are f%$#*ed."
Recommended by Gary C., Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Just over two hundred years ago, there were one billion humans on Earth.

There are now over seven billion of us.

And, sometime this century, the world population will reach at least ten billion.

Deforestation. Desertification. Species extinction. Global warming. Growing threats to food and water. The driving issues of our times are the result of one huge problem: Us.

As the population continues to grow, our problems will increase. And this means that every way we look at it, a planet of ten billion people is likely to be a nightmare.

Stephen Emmott, a scientist whose lab is at the forefront of research into complex natural systems, sounds the alarm. Ten Billion is a snapshot of our planet, and our species, approaching a crisis, and a stark analysis of where this leaves us. Ten Billion is not another climate book. Ten Billion is a book about us.

Review:

"This muscular but anxious broadside by Emmott, a Cambridge scientist, predicts a bleak future of critical shortages, droughts, starvation, and natural disasters once the Earth's population reaches the book's eponymous number. Whether it's water or food, population trends mean that present levels of consumption can't continue. The author is forceful, if frantic, in supplying the numbers. Forty percent of the planet is already devoted to agriculture, with governments and conglomerates in Europe, the Middle East, and Asia quickly gobbling up the remaining land. As the global population grows in number and wealth, the demand for food and resource-depleting consumer goods will rise. With a few hair-raising facts, Emmott deftly demonstrates that production is itself consumption: One liter of bottled water requires four liters to produce; a hamburger takes 800 gallons. Whereas technology helped forestall crises in the past, it now uses up the very resources it's designed to preserve. Water desalination, for instance, requires energy intensive and releases many pollutants. Nuclear power would offer short-term hope but remains unpopular. The author sees only 'radical behavior change' as a viable solution but does not say how this would work. Emmott's facts are enough to shake steely optimists, though the book's Malthusian pathos could be a bit cloying even for like-minded pessimists. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review:

“A rallying call to arms....Succinct and righteously pessimistic...[with] an indispensible message to galvanize a world in potential crisis.” Kirkus Reviews

Review:

“The cumulative effect of [Emmott’s] uncluttered, unadorned prose, buttressed with graphs and illustrations, is significant....A spine-chilling warning of the environmental disaster that awaits the Earth.” The Daily Telegraph

Review:

"Powerful....Compelling....The shift in thinking that will be needed if we are to prepare ourselves for living in a different world begins with reading Emmott's indispensable book." The Guardian

Review:

"A stark, simple and short warning about the coming catastrophe, which [Emmott] feels is inevitable, resulting from human overpopulation and over-exploitation of the world’s resources....A valuable contribution to rekindling a discussion on global population that has waxed and waned in the two centuries since Thomas Robert Malthus first brought the issue to public attention." Financial Times

Synopsis:

A VINTAGE PAPERBACK ORIGINAL

Just 10,000 years ago, there were only one million humans on Earth.

By 1800, just over two hundred years ago, there were one billion of us.

By 1960, there were three billion.

There are now over seven billion of us.

By 2050, there will be at least nine billion other people — and, sometime near the end of this century, there will be at least ten billion of us.

There is simply no known way to provide this many people with clothes, food, and fresh water. And any action we take to address these issues will turn up the thermostat on global warming.

Stephen Emmott has dedicated his career to researching the effects of humans on the Earth’s natural systems. This is his call to arms, an urgent plea to re-imagine the interconnected web of our global problems in a new light.

About the Author

Stephen Emmott is head of Computational Science at Microsoft Research. He leads a broad scientific research program, at the center of which is an interdisciplinary team of new kinds of scientists, and a new kind of laboratory, in Cambridge, England, pioneering new approaches to tackle fundamental problems in science. His lab’s research spans from molecular biology, immunology, and neuroscience, to plant biology, climatology, biogeochemistry, terrestrial and marine ecology, and conversation biology, as well as the new fields of programming life and artificial photosynthesis. Stephen is also Visiting Professor of Computational Science, University of Oxford; Visiting Professor of Biological Computation, University College London; and Distinguished Fellow of the UK National Endowment of Science, Technology and the Arts.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 4 comments:

twicelovedbooks, May 24, 2014 (view all comments by twicelovedbooks)
The best book I have read this decade!! In fact, the best book already read 3 times from cover-to-cover so far!!
If you want to plunk your head in the sand and ignore the warning signs, go ahead...but I'm glad I won't be around in 2050!
Science facts and figures spell it out clearly. And Emmott does not hold back on either. Well thought out, clearly written, and specific in results and projections. Please buy and share this with those you love and care about.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)
hopechange, January 20, 2014 (view all comments by hopechange)
Do not fret, the earth can handle the population increase. You Malthusians are just as nuts as the End Time's crowd. Read the Population Bomb from the 60's, it predicted mass worldwide starvation in the 70's and 80's. Laughable, doomsday prophets and profiteering all of it. The only thing holding us back from feeding everyone and progressing as a society is political dysfunction, dangerous dogma like yours, and greed. If the world is over-populated, I suggest the Malthusians commit mass suicide so the bulk of humanity can try to solve the real issues.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(3 of 7 readers found this comment helpful)
The Wicked Ambrosia, January 15, 2014 (view all comments by The Wicked Ambrosia)
Holy whaaaaaaaaaat! I know not many people out there want to hear the dirty truth about where we're headed on a global environmental scale, which is only compounding the issues at hand. If you want a knowledgeable read - this is the book for you. 'Ten Billion' is a must-read, particularly for those who would say Rachel Carson's 'Silent Spring' is also required. What are you waiting for? READ.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
View all 4 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780345806475
Author:
Emmott, Stephen
Publisher:
Vintage
Subject:
Environmental Conservation & Protection
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Vintage
Publication Date:
20130910
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8 x 5.18 x 0.55 in 0.62 lb

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Related Subjects

Engineering » Environmental Engineering » Pollution Control
Featured Titles » History and Social Science
Featured Titles » Staff Picks
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
Reference » Science Reference » General
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Environment
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » General

Ten Billion New Trade Paper
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$12.95 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Vintage - English 9780345806475 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

This is the most terrifying book ever about overpopulation and the impending environmental horrors! Think 7 billion people is a strain on natural resources? Trying to feed 10 billion would deforest the entire planet and consume every drop of fresh water available... and current population growth figures, if left unchecked, lead experts to believe the population could hit 28 billion by 2100! Forget the economy, forget politics, forget religious objections — if we don't take drastic action now(!!) regarding overpopulation, carbon emissions, deforestation, and water use, I feel Stephen Emmott's concluding sentence will inevitably be true: "We are f%$#*ed."

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This muscular but anxious broadside by Emmott, a Cambridge scientist, predicts a bleak future of critical shortages, droughts, starvation, and natural disasters once the Earth's population reaches the book's eponymous number. Whether it's water or food, population trends mean that present levels of consumption can't continue. The author is forceful, if frantic, in supplying the numbers. Forty percent of the planet is already devoted to agriculture, with governments and conglomerates in Europe, the Middle East, and Asia quickly gobbling up the remaining land. As the global population grows in number and wealth, the demand for food and resource-depleting consumer goods will rise. With a few hair-raising facts, Emmott deftly demonstrates that production is itself consumption: One liter of bottled water requires four liters to produce; a hamburger takes 800 gallons. Whereas technology helped forestall crises in the past, it now uses up the very resources it's designed to preserve. Water desalination, for instance, requires energy intensive and releases many pollutants. Nuclear power would offer short-term hope but remains unpopular. The author sees only 'radical behavior change' as a viable solution but does not say how this would work. Emmott's facts are enough to shake steely optimists, though the book's Malthusian pathos could be a bit cloying even for like-minded pessimists. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Review" by , “A rallying call to arms....Succinct and righteously pessimistic...[with] an indispensible message to galvanize a world in potential crisis.”
"Review" by , “The cumulative effect of [Emmott’s] uncluttered, unadorned prose, buttressed with graphs and illustrations, is significant....A spine-chilling warning of the environmental disaster that awaits the Earth.”
"Review" by , "Powerful....Compelling....The shift in thinking that will be needed if we are to prepare ourselves for living in a different world begins with reading Emmott's indispensable book."
"Review" by , "A stark, simple and short warning about the coming catastrophe, which [Emmott] feels is inevitable, resulting from human overpopulation and over-exploitation of the world’s resources....A valuable contribution to rekindling a discussion on global population that has waxed and waned in the two centuries since Thomas Robert Malthus first brought the issue to public attention."
"Synopsis" by , A VINTAGE PAPERBACK ORIGINAL

Just 10,000 years ago, there were only one million humans on Earth.

By 1800, just over two hundred years ago, there were one billion of us.

By 1960, there were three billion.

There are now over seven billion of us.

By 2050, there will be at least nine billion other people — and, sometime near the end of this century, there will be at least ten billion of us.

There is simply no known way to provide this many people with clothes, food, and fresh water. And any action we take to address these issues will turn up the thermostat on global warming.

Stephen Emmott has dedicated his career to researching the effects of humans on the Earth’s natural systems. This is his call to arms, an urgent plea to re-imagine the interconnected web of our global problems in a new light.

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