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This title in other editions

Twenty Days With Julian & Little Bunny By Papa

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Twenty Days With Julian & Little Bunny By Papa Cover

ISBN13: 9781590170427
ISBN10: 1590170423
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

On July 28, 1851, Nathaniel Hawthorne's wife Sophia and daughters Una and Rose left their house in Western Massachusetts to visit relatives near Boston. Hawthorne and his five-year-old son Julian stayed behind. How father and son got along over the next three weeks is the subject of this tender and funny extract from Hawthorne's notebooks.

"At about six o'clock I looked over the edge of my bed and saw that Julian was awake, peeping sideways at me." Each day starts early and is mostly given over to swimming and skipping stones, berry-picking and subduing armies of thistles. There are lots of questions ("It really does seem as if he has baited me with more questions, references, and observations, than mortal father ought to be expected to endure"), a visit to a Shaker community, domestic crises concerning a pet rabbit, and some poignant moments of loneliness ("I went to bed at about nine and longed for Phoebe"). And one evening Mr. Herman Melville comes by to enjoy a late-night discussion of eternity over cigars.

With an introduction by Paul Auster that paints a beautifully observed, intimate picture of the Hawthornes at home, this little-known, true-life story by a great American writer emerges from obscurity to shine a delightful light upon family life?then and now.

Review:

"The journal is a tiny classic of parental writing about children." Booklist

Review:

"[C]harming....Unusual evidence, if any were needed, that a writer does indeed need a room of his (or her) own." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"Until Twain, no one in American literature other than Hawthorne imagined children. This little account is pure evidence of Hawthorne's special genius. And Paul Auster's brilliant introduction tells us how Hawthorne knew what he knew and, more interestingly, why. It is Auster and Hawthorne at their best — precise, highly intelligent, and utterly entranced." Russell Banks

Review:

"Paul Auster's charming introduction helps to turn Hawthorne from a remote classic into a fresh and contemporary human voice. This is a delightful book." Andrew Delbanco

Synopsis:

In July of 1851, Nathaniel Hawthorne's wife and daughters took a trip to visit relatives. How Hawthorne and his five-year-old son Julian managed in their absence is the subject of this tender and funny excerpt from Hawthorne's notebooks. Each day is spent swimming, skipping stones, picking berries, and subduing armies of thistles. There are lots of questions ("He has baited me with more questions, references, and observations, than mortal father ought to be expected to endure"), crises concerning a pet bunny, and only one moment of grown-up companionship — when Mr. Herman Melville stops by to discuss eternity over cigars. This true-life story by a great American writer emerges from obscurity to shine a delightful light upon family life — then and now. An introduction by noted novelist Paul Auster adds to this intimate portrait.

Synopsis:

Originally published within the seventh folio of Hawthorne's "American Notebooks," this brief narrative shows the American writer playing Mr. Mom with his five-year-old son when his wife and daughters take a trip to visit relatives.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

chadwick, January 13, 2010 (view all comments by chadwick)
The best book I have read this past decade, this slim volume comes courtesy of writer Paul Auster who discovered hiding within the pages of Hawthorne's notebooks, the story of twenty summer days from July 28th to August 16th 1851 that writer Nathaniel Hawthorne spent looking after his son and his pet rabbit, Bunny as his wife, Sophia went to visit relatives with the couple's two daughter's, Una and Rose. The trouble starts as soon as young Julian becomes aware that the baby is gone and is free to make as much noise as he pleases, exercising his lungs with screams and shouts. I have given copies of this book to a few expected fathers as it captures both the exasperation and the tenderness that comes with being a Dad. No other writer quite writes about children and childhood the way that Hawthorne so effortlessly does. The book includes a visit by writer Herman Melville. Also, for the sake of curiosity be sure to read what becomes of young Julian by checking out the biography, Hawthorne: a Life by Brenda Wineapple.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781590170427
Introduction:
Auster, Paul
Publisher:
New York Review of Books
Introduction by:
Auster, Paul
Introduction:
Auster, Paul
Author:
Hawthorne, Nathaniel
Author:
Auster, Paul
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
American - General
Subject:
Fathers and sons
Subject:
Authors, American
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Authors, American -- 19th century -- Diaries.
Subject:
Hawthorne, Nathaniel - Diaries
Subject:
Biography-Literary
Copyright:
Series:
New York Review Books Classics
Series Volume:
no. 1739S
Publication Date:
20030531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
128
Dimensions:
7.36x5.28x.63 in. .49 lbs.

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Related Subjects

» Biography » General
» Biography » Literary
» Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
» Humanities » Literary Criticism » General
» Reference » Writing » General

Twenty Days With Julian & Little Bunny By Papa New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$16.95 In Stock
Product details 128 pages New York Review of Books - English 9781590170427 Reviews:
"Review" by , "The journal is a tiny classic of parental writing about children."
"Review" by , "[C]harming....Unusual evidence, if any were needed, that a writer does indeed need a room of his (or her) own."
"Review" by , "Until Twain, no one in American literature other than Hawthorne imagined children. This little account is pure evidence of Hawthorne's special genius. And Paul Auster's brilliant introduction tells us how Hawthorne knew what he knew and, more interestingly, why. It is Auster and Hawthorne at their best — precise, highly intelligent, and utterly entranced."
"Review" by , "Paul Auster's charming introduction helps to turn Hawthorne from a remote classic into a fresh and contemporary human voice. This is a delightful book."
"Synopsis" by , In July of 1851, Nathaniel Hawthorne's wife and daughters took a trip to visit relatives. How Hawthorne and his five-year-old son Julian managed in their absence is the subject of this tender and funny excerpt from Hawthorne's notebooks. Each day is spent swimming, skipping stones, picking berries, and subduing armies of thistles. There are lots of questions ("He has baited me with more questions, references, and observations, than mortal father ought to be expected to endure"), crises concerning a pet bunny, and only one moment of grown-up companionship — when Mr. Herman Melville stops by to discuss eternity over cigars. This true-life story by a great American writer emerges from obscurity to shine a delightful light upon family life — then and now. An introduction by noted novelist Paul Auster adds to this intimate portrait.
"Synopsis" by , Originally published within the seventh folio of Hawthorne's "American Notebooks," this brief narrative shows the American writer playing Mr. Mom with his five-year-old son when his wife and daughters take a trip to visit relatives.
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