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The Master and Margarita

by

The Master and Margarita Cover

ISBN13: 9780141180144
ISBN10: 0141180145
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Mikhail Bulgakov's devastating satire of Soviet life was written during the darkest period of Stalin's regime. Combining two distinct yet interwoven parts-one set in ancient Jerusalem, one in contemporary Moscow-the novel veers from moods of wild theatricality with violent storms, vampire attacks, and a Satanic ball; to such somber scenes as the meeting of Pilate and Yeshua, and the murder of Judas in the moonlit garden of Gethsemane; to the substanceless, circus-like reality of Moscow. Its central characters, Woland (Satan) and his retinue-including the vodka-drinking, black cat, Behemoth; the poet, Ivan Homeless; Pontius Pilate; and a writer known only as The Master, and his passionate companion, Margarita-exist in a world that blends fantasy and chilling realism, an artful collage of grostesqueries, dark comedy, and timeless ethical questions.

Although completed in 1940, The Master and Margarita was not published in Moscow until 1966, when the first part appeared in the magazine Moskva. It was an immediate and enduring success: Audiences responded with great enthusiasm to its expression of artistic and spiritual freedom. This new translation has been created from the complete and unabridged Russian texts.

Review:

"One of the truly great Russian novels of this century." The New York Times Book Review

Review:

One of the greatest novels ever to come out of the Soviet Union. A parable on power and its corruption, on good and evil and on human frailty and the strength of love. Equal parts fable, fantasy, political satire and slapstick. "A rich, funny, moving and bitter novel." The New York Times

Review:

"Fine, funny, imaginative....The Master and Margarita stands squarely in the great Gogolesque tradition of satiric narrative." Saul Maloff, Newsweek

Review:

"A wild surrealistic romp....Brilliantly flamboyant and outrageous." Joyce Carol Oates, The Detroit News

Synopsis:

Nothing in the whole of literature compares with The Master and Margarita. Full of pungency and wit, this luminous work is Bulgakov's crowning achievement, skilfully blending magical and realistic elements, grotesque situations and major ethical concerns. Written during the darkest period of Stalin's repressive reign and a devastating satire of Soviet life, it combines two distinct yet interwoven parts, one set in contemporary Moscow, the other in ancient Jerusalem, each brimming with incident and with historical, imaginary, frightful and wonderful characters. Although completed in 1940, The Master and Margarita was not published until 1966 when the first section appeared in the monthly magazine Moskva. Russians everywhere responded enthusiastically to the novel's artistic and spiritual freedom and it was an immediate and enduring success. This new translation has been made from the complete and unabridged Russian text.

 

Synopsis:

Written during the darkest, most repressive period of Stalin's reign, this novel gives substance to the notion of artistic and religious freedom. Despite its devastating satire of Soviet life and its audacious portrayals of Christ and Satan, the manuscript had somehow eluded Russian censors, and the enthusiasm of its readers assured the novel immediate and enduring success. "The New York Times Book Review" calls this "one of the truly great Russian novels of this century".

About the Author

Mikhail Bulgakov (1891–1940) was a doctor, a novelist, a playwright, a short-story writer, and the assistant director of the Moscow Arts Theater. His body of work includes The White Guard, The Fatal Eggs, Heart of a Dog, and his masterpiece, The Master and Margarita, published more than twenty-five years after his death and cited as an inspiration for Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses.

Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky have produced acclaimed translations of Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Gogol, and Bulgakov. Their translation of The Brothers Karamazov won the 1991 PEN/Book-of-the-Month Club Translation Prize. They are married and live in Paris, France.

Table of Contents

The Master and Margarita Introduction

A Note on the Text and Acknowledgments

Further Reading

BOOK ONE

1. Never Talk with Strangers

2. Pontius Pilate

3. The Seventh Proof

4. The Chase

5. There were Doings at Griboedov's

6. Schizophrenia, as was Said

7. A Naughty Apartment

8. The Combat between the Professor and the Poet

9. Koroviev's Stunts

10. News from Yalta

11. Ivan Splits in Two

12. Black Magic and Its Exposure

13. The Hero Enters

14. Glory to the Cock!

15. Nikanor Ivanovich's Dream

16. The Execution

17. An Unquiet Day

18. Hapless Visitors

BOOK TWO

19. Margarita

20. Azazello's Dream

21. Flight

22. By Candlelight

23. The Great Ball at Satan's

24. The Extraction of the Master

25. How the Procurator Tried to Save Judas of Kiriath

26. The Burial

27. The End of Apartment No. 50

28. The Last Adventures of Koroviev and Behemoth

29. The Fate of the Master and Margarita is Decided

30. It's Time! It's Time!

31. On Sparrow Hills

32. Forgiveness and Eternal Refuge

Epilogue

Notes

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

James Davis, January 1, 2012 (view all comments by James Davis)
I’ve heard a lot of raves about Bulgakov’s masterpiece over the years and have had it on my to-read list for a long time waiting for the Folio Society to publish it. They finally have and I heartily recommend the edition: the new translation by Pevear and Volokhonsky and wonderful illustrations by Peter Suart and a nice introduction by the not-so-nice Orlando Figes. Whatever the edition, you need to check out this book.

This is a Faustian adventure set in Stalin’s Moscow and Jerusalem at the time of Jesus Christ. The devil and his retinue come to Moscow with their back of tricks and hijinx that Bulgakov uses masterfully to illustrate both life under Stalin for everyone and the life of a writer under Stalin’s censors. The author uses the parallel story lines of the devil’s visit to Moscow, Pontius Pilate and Jesus, and the Master and the Margarita to create a brilliant satire of Stalinist life. “Manuscripts don’t burn…” but sometimes they need to be hidden in a drawer for thirty years after your death. Even then, it seems a miracle that this book ever got published.

I love Bugakov’s introduction of his heroine:
“Margarita Nikolaevna was not in need of money. Margarita Nikolaevna could buy whatever she liked. Among her husband’s acquaintances there were some interesting people. Margarita Nikolaevna had never touched a primus stove. Margarita Nikolaevna knew nothing of the horrors of life in a communal apartment. In short…she was happy? Not for one minute! Never, since the age of nineteen, when she had married and wound up in this house, had she known any happiness. Gods, my gods! What, then did this woman need?! What did this woman need, in whose eyes there always burned some enigmatic little fire? What did she need, this witch with a slight cast in one eye, who had adorned herself with mimosa that time in the spring? I don not know. I have no idea. Obviously she was telling the truth, she needed him, the master, and not at all some Gothic mansion, not a private garden, not money. She loved him, she was telling the truth.”
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Katya0046, January 1, 2010 (view all comments by Katya0046)
I first read this when I was a Russian student at the Defense Language Institute several years ago. I was naturally interested, having heard that it was suppressed for several decades and caused a sensation when it was finally released as serial in Moscow magazine in the 60s. Both understandably--the book is a stunning portrait of the surreal-ity that permeated life during the Stalinist years, but it's more than that--it's a meditation on the nature of good and evil, and so beautiful and funny and moving that it's hard to believe that it came from the mind of a mere mortal.
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lisa_emily, October 19, 2007 (view all comments by lisa_emily)
The devil arrives in Moscow: heads will roll, money falls from the ceiling, people fight over haunted apartments. In an institution run by Stravinsky, a writer driven mad by critics, meets a poet driven mad by seeing a large cat. Magarita, handpicked by Satan, is turned into a witch, while her housekeeper also turns into a witch and rides Magarita's husband, who is turned into a pig.

Overall, a rollicking satire with a hint of sadness. And cats will do the strangest things.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780141180144
Translator:
Pevear, Richard
Translator:
Volokhonsky, Larissa
Translator:
Pevear, Richard
Author:
Pevear, Richard
Author:
Bulgakov, Mikhail
Author:
Volokhonsky, Larissa
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Location:
London
Subject:
History
Subject:
Classics
Subject:
Novels and novellas
Subject:
Soviet Union
Subject:
Moscow
Subject:
Satire
Subject:
Political fiction
Subject:
Jerusalem
Subject:
Allegories
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Series Volume:
vol. 64
Publication Date:
20010131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
432
Dimensions:
7.77x5.02x.79 in. .69 lbs.
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

The Master and Margarita New Trade Paper
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Product details 432 pages Penguin Books - English 9780141180144 Reviews:
"Review" by , "One of the truly great Russian novels of this century."
"Review" by , One of the greatest novels ever to come out of the Soviet Union. A parable on power and its corruption, on good and evil and on human frailty and the strength of love. Equal parts fable, fantasy, political satire and slapstick. "A rich, funny, moving and bitter novel."
"Review" by , "Fine, funny, imaginative....The Master and Margarita stands squarely in the great Gogolesque tradition of satiric narrative."
"Review" by , "A wild surrealistic romp....Brilliantly flamboyant and outrageous."
"Synopsis" by ,

Nothing in the whole of literature compares with The Master and Margarita. Full of pungency and wit, this luminous work is Bulgakov's crowning achievement, skilfully blending magical and realistic elements, grotesque situations and major ethical concerns. Written during the darkest period of Stalin's repressive reign and a devastating satire of Soviet life, it combines two distinct yet interwoven parts, one set in contemporary Moscow, the other in ancient Jerusalem, each brimming with incident and with historical, imaginary, frightful and wonderful characters. Although completed in 1940, The Master and Margarita was not published until 1966 when the first section appeared in the monthly magazine Moskva. Russians everywhere responded enthusiastically to the novel's artistic and spiritual freedom and it was an immediate and enduring success. This new translation has been made from the complete and unabridged Russian text.

 

"Synopsis" by , Written during the darkest, most repressive period of Stalin's reign, this novel gives substance to the notion of artistic and religious freedom. Despite its devastating satire of Soviet life and its audacious portrayals of Christ and Satan, the manuscript had somehow eluded Russian censors, and the enthusiasm of its readers assured the novel immediate and enduring success. "The New York Times Book Review" calls this "one of the truly great Russian novels of this century".

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