The Fictioning
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | September 30, 2014

    Brian Doyle: IMG The Rude Burl of Our Masks



    One day when I was 12 years old and setting off on my newspaper route after school my mom said will you stop at the doctor's and pick up something... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$26.95
New Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
7 Remote Warehouse Popular Fiction- Technothrillers

More copies of this ISBN

Angelmaker

by

Angelmaker Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A Wall Street Journal and Booklist Best Mystery of 2012

From the acclaimed author of The Gone-Away World, blistering gangster noir meets howling absurdist comedy as the forces of good square off against the forces of evil, and only an unassuming clockwork repairman and an octogenarian former superspy can save the world from total destruction.

 

Joe Spork spends his days fixing antique clocks. The son of infamous London criminal Mathew “Tommy Gun” Spork, he has turned his back on his family’s mobster history and aims to live a quiet life. That orderly existence is suddenly upended when Joe activates a particularly unusual clockwork mechanism. His client, Edie Banister, is more than the kindly old lady she appears to be—she’s a retired international secret agent. And the device? It’s a 1950s doomsday machine. Having triggered it, Joe now faces the wrath of both the British government and a diabolical South Asian dictator who is also Edie’s old arch-nemesis. On the upside, Joe’s got a girl: a bold receptionist named Polly whose smarts, savvy and sex appeal may be just what he needs. With Joe’s once-quiet world suddenly overrun by mad monks, psychopathic serial killers, scientific geniuses and threats to the future of conscious life in the universe, he realizes that the only way to survive is to muster the courage to fight, help Edie complete a mission she abandoned years ago and pick up his father’s old gun . . .

Review:

"In Harkaway's endlessly inventive second novel (after The Gone-Away World), Londoner Joe Spork has turned his back on his late father's mobster legacy and become instead a clock repairman. Asked by a friend to fix a complex old machine, Joe finds himself inexplicably pursued by shadowy government agents, a rogue sect of technophiliac monks, a suburban serial killer and an identity-shifting Asian drug lord called Opium Khan. As Joe races to discover the true purpose of the machine, he learns that the answer might lie with elderly Edie Banister, a superspy during WWII. Edie's flashbacks to her war adventures are easily the most diverting aspect of this book, but in no way overshadow Joe's frantic search to uncover the truth about the machine, a doomsday device that turns out to be linked to his family history. With the fate of the world in his hands, Joe realizes that the only way to save the planet might be for him to embrace his father's gangster heritage. Perhaps inspired by the New Wave science fiction of Michael Moorcock, the London crime novels of Jake Arnott, and the spy fiction of John le Carré (the author's father), the novel ends up being its own absurdist sendup of pulp story tropes and end-of-the-world scenarios. Although the narrative often threatens to go off the rails, Harkaway makes his novel great fun on every page. Agent: Patrick Walsh, Conville and Walsh Literary Agency, U.K." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

US

Synopsis:

From the acclaimed author of The Gone-Away World, blistering gangster noir meets howling absurdist comedy as the forces of good square off against the forces of evil, and only an unassuming clockwork repairman and an octogenarian former superspy can save the world from total destruction.

 

Joe Spork spends his days fixing antique clocks. The son of infamous London criminal Mathew “Tommy Gun” Spork, he has turned his back on his family’s mobster history and aims to live a quiet life. That orderly existence is suddenly upended when Joe activates a particularly unusual clockwork mechanism. His client, Edie Banister, is more than the kindly old lady she appears to be—she’s a retired international secret agent. And the device? It’s a 1950s doomsday machine. Having triggered it, Joe now faces the wrath of both the British government and a diabolical South Asian dictator who is also Edie’s old arch-nemesis. On the upside, Joe’s got a girl: a bold receptionist named Polly whose smarts, savvy and sex appeal may be just what he needs. With Joe’s once-quiet world suddenly overrun by mad monks, psychopathic serial killers, scientific geniuses and threats to the future of conscious life in the universe, he realizes that the only way to survive is to muster the courage to fight, help Edie complete a mission she abandoned years ago and pick up his father’s old gun . . .

Video

About the Author

Nick Harkaway was born in Cornwall in 1972. He studied philosophy, sociology and politics at Clare College, Cambridge, and then worked in the film industry. His fiction debut was The Gone-Away World. He lives in London with his wife and daughter.

 

www.nickharkaway.com

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

K Roze, January 13, 2013 (view all comments by K Roze)
This new Harkaway novel could have been written by an author not even remotely related to the author of Gone-Away World. But a total joy to read all the same. I cared deeply about the unusual characters and was drawn into the mystery from beginning to end. I wish I could convince everyone to buy this fantastic novel!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
Miscellaneous Steve, January 9, 2013 (view all comments by Miscellaneous Steve)
The most fun you'll have with secret societies and world-ending conspiracies all year. Harkaway is a wonderful writer and this book is a complete delight to read.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
yancey, January 2, 2013 (view all comments by yancey)
When the Gone Away World came out in 2008, I bought a copy that languished on my shelf for a bout six months. I finally got around to reading it in early 2009, and immediately kicked myself for waiting that long. I swore I'd put Harkaway on my list of Authors To Watch, which meant stalking them on Facebook, and following them on Twitter, so I'd know immediately when the next book came out. (I do the same whit Charles Stross and John Scalzi, just to name a couple) In March of last year, while awaiting the birth of iour first son, Angelmaker dropped. I had pre-ordered a copy on the Kindle, so when I woke up that Tuesday morning, there it was, in all it's Sci-fi, Le Carre espionage, steam punk and runaway thriller glory. I had lots of time as my wife and our son slept away the rigors and strains of childbirth, I read Angelmaker through in two or three sittings. Mr. Harkaway's gleeful use of the English language as a playground, the heroine, the protagonist and the evil mastermind, the rollicking sense of adventure lost and regained all combined for the most enjoyable book I read this year. I wish i could put my finger on one or two things that make this the best book of the year, but that is the beauty of the thing. There are so many elements, so many things I loved and want to share with everyone, that I can't nail it down. If a gun was placed to my head, and I had to name one thing, just one thing that made me love this book so much, it would be the heart. The heart Mr. Harkaway puts into even the most minor of characters. That and the bees, of course.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 3 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307595959
Author:
Harkaway, Nick
Publisher:
Knopf Publishing Group
Subject:
Espionage
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
Popular Fiction - Adventure
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20120331
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
496
Dimensions:
9.52 x 6.55 x 1.64 in 1.66 lb

Other books you might like

  1. Beauty Queens
    Used Trade Paper $6.95
  2. Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar...
    Sale Hardcover $6.98
  3. Ready Player One
    Used Trade Paper $7.50
  4. After the Apocalypse: Stories New Trade Paper $16.00
  5. The Brief History of the Dead...
    Used Trade Paper $2.50
  6. Too Beautiful for You: Tales of... New Trade Paper $12.75

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Humor » General
Featured Titles » Literature
Featured Titles » New Arrivals
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » New Arrivals
Fiction and Poetry » Popular Fiction » Adventure
Fiction and Poetry » Popular Fiction » Technothrillers
Fiction and Poetry » Science Fiction and Fantasy » A to Z

Angelmaker New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$26.95 In Stock
Product details 496 pages Knopf Publishing Group - English 9780307595959 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In Harkaway's endlessly inventive second novel (after The Gone-Away World), Londoner Joe Spork has turned his back on his late father's mobster legacy and become instead a clock repairman. Asked by a friend to fix a complex old machine, Joe finds himself inexplicably pursued by shadowy government agents, a rogue sect of technophiliac monks, a suburban serial killer and an identity-shifting Asian drug lord called Opium Khan. As Joe races to discover the true purpose of the machine, he learns that the answer might lie with elderly Edie Banister, a superspy during WWII. Edie's flashbacks to her war adventures are easily the most diverting aspect of this book, but in no way overshadow Joe's frantic search to uncover the truth about the machine, a doomsday device that turns out to be linked to his family history. With the fate of the world in his hands, Joe realizes that the only way to save the planet might be for him to embrace his father's gangster heritage. Perhaps inspired by the New Wave science fiction of Michael Moorcock, the London crime novels of Jake Arnott, and the spy fiction of John le Carré (the author's father), the novel ends up being its own absurdist sendup of pulp story tropes and end-of-the-world scenarios. Although the narrative often threatens to go off the rails, Harkaway makes his novel great fun on every page. Agent: Patrick Walsh, Conville and Walsh Literary Agency, U.K." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , US
"Synopsis" by , From the acclaimed author of The Gone-Away World, blistering gangster noir meets howling absurdist comedy as the forces of good square off against the forces of evil, and only an unassuming clockwork repairman and an octogenarian former superspy can save the world from total destruction.

 

Joe Spork spends his days fixing antique clocks. The son of infamous London criminal Mathew “Tommy Gun” Spork, he has turned his back on his family’s mobster history and aims to live a quiet life. That orderly existence is suddenly upended when Joe activates a particularly unusual clockwork mechanism. His client, Edie Banister, is more than the kindly old lady she appears to be—she’s a retired international secret agent. And the device? It’s a 1950s doomsday machine. Having triggered it, Joe now faces the wrath of both the British government and a diabolical South Asian dictator who is also Edie’s old arch-nemesis. On the upside, Joe’s got a girl: a bold receptionist named Polly whose smarts, savvy and sex appeal may be just what he needs. With Joe’s once-quiet world suddenly overrun by mad monks, psychopathic serial killers, scientific geniuses and threats to the future of conscious life in the universe, he realizes that the only way to survive is to muster the courage to fight, help Edie complete a mission she abandoned years ago and pick up his father’s old gun . . .

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.