Poetry Madness
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Q&A | February 27, 2014

Rene Denfeld: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Rene Denfeld



Describe your latest book. The Enchanted is a story narrated by a man on death row. The novel was inspired by my work as a death penalty... Continue »
  1. $18.19 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    The Enchanted

    Rene Denfeld 9780062285508

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$32.50
New Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
4 Local Warehouse Biography- Historical
15 Remote Warehouse World History- General

Into the Silence

by

Into the Silence Cover

ISBN13: 9780375408892
ISBN10: 0375408894
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

On June 6, 1924, two men set out from a camp perched at 23,000 feet on an ice ledge just below the lip of Mount Everest’s North Col. George Mallory, thirty-seven, was Britain’s finest climber. Sandy Irvine was a young Oxford scholar of twenty-two with little previous mountaineering experience. Neither of them returned.

In this magisterial work of history and adventure, based on more than a decade of prodigious research in British, Canadian, and European archives, and months in the field in Nepal and Tibet, Wade Davis vividly re-creates British climbers’ epic attempts to scale Mount Everest in the early 1920s. With new access to letters and diaries, Davis recounts the heroic efforts of George Mallory and his fellow climbers to conquer the mountain in the face of treacherous terrain and furious weather. Into the Silence sets their remarkable achievements in sweeping historical context: Davis shows how the exploration originated in nineteenth-century imperial ambitions, and he takes us far beyond the Himalayas to the trenches of World War I, where Mallory and his generation found themselves and their world utterly shattered.  In the wake of the war that destroyed all notions of honor and decency, the Everest expeditions, led by these scions of Britain’s elite, emerged as a symbol of national redemption and hope.

Beautifully written and rich with detail, Into the Silence is a classic account of exploration and endurance, and a timeless portrait of an extraordinary generation of adventurers, soldiers, and mountaineers the likes of which we will never see again.

Review:

"Davis (Wayfinders), a National Geographic explorer-in-residence, tells the story of how a group of men who survived the unfathomable violence of WWI became obsessed with scaling Mt. Everest. Their quest was not for their own glory but for the psyche of their ravaged country and to reaffirm that the human spirit could soar above the inhumanity that countries perpetrate on one another on the battlefield. As with all his works, Davis relies on impeccable research to go into uncommon detail to outline a backstory that centers on the atrocities of trench warfare, English imperialism in India, and the first European expeditions into Tibet and the Himalayas. He also digs deep into the schooling and upbringing of those who took part in the first Everest expeditions, going so far as to investigate the early same-sex relationships of George Mallory. While Davis takes his time leading up to Mallory's first attempt at the summit, his own exploration experience helps him get into the minds of the climbers, the descriptions of the ascents — including the tragic 1922 attempt that saw seven Sherpas lose their lives and the long-unresolved conclusion to the 1924 climb that resulted in Mallory and Andrew Irvine's deaths — are as breathtaking and astounding as any previous climbing literature. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review:

"Davis's book, ten years in the writing, is highly absorbing narrative....A heroic attempt to capture the scale of the undertaking to conquer the highest mountain on earth." The Newark Star-Ledger

Review:

"A magnificent, audacious venture...Into the Silence is quite unlike any other mountaineering book. It not only spins a gripping Boy's Own yarn about the early British expeditions to Everest, but investigates how the carnage of the trenches bled into a desire for redemption at the top of the world. Many of those Himalayan explorers, including Mallory, had served in the corpse-ridden fields of northern France. Indeed, of the 26 men who climbed in the three expeditions, 20 had seen front-line action. Six had been severely wounded, two others hospitalized by disease at the front, and one treated for shell shock. All had seen dozens of friends and countrymen die. For these veterans, the author argues, death had lost its power....At its heart, Into the Silence is an elegy for a lost generation." The Sunday Times

Review:

"A gripper of a read...Silence revives the cliff's-edge drama of those Jazz age climbs and drives home the tragedy of Mallory's death." Outside

Review:

"The men in this story had, for the most part, been young in 1914, bright and energetic and full of dreams. By 1918 those who had survived had seen and done things that no one should have to know about, and Davis does a magnificent job detailing their experiences, setting up the rest of the story — the expeditionary saga — as a logical response, even an inspired rejoinder to the soul-destroying realities of war...it is perhaps the book's signature achievement that [Davis] keeps the narrative zipping along toward its inexorable and tragic conclusion while so thoroughly and persuasively contextualizing key events." The Boston Globe

Review:

"This profoundly ambitious book aims high itself, because it sets the subject of Everest in a specific historical context....Davis's monumental work ranges...widely through the matter of Everest, both on and off the mountain, with harrowing descriptions of life and death on the Western Front, with frank dissections of rivalries, motives, inadequacies and confusions, and measured character studies." The Telegraph

Review:

"[A] meticulous history....Culminating in detailed accounts of the ascents that astutely weigh events and controversies, this vital contribution to Everest literature should rivet readers." Booklist

Review:

"The First World War, the worst calamity humanity has ever inflicted on itself, still reverberates in our lives. In its immediate aftermath, a few young men who had fought in it went looking for a healing challenge, and found it far from the Western Front. In recreating their astonishing adventure, Wade Davis has given us an elegant meditation on the courage to carry on." George F. Will

Review:

"I was captivated. Wade Davis has penned an exceptional book on an extraordinary generation. They do not make them like that anymore. And there would always only ever be one Mallory. From the pathos of the trenches to the inevitable tragedies high on Everest this is a book deserving of awards. Monumental in its scope and conception it nevertheless remains hypnotically fascinating throughout. A wonderful story tinged with sadness." Joe Simpson, author of Touching the Void

Synopsis:

In this magisterial work of history and adventure, Wade Davis vividly re-creates Britain’s epic attempts to scale Mount Everest in the early 1920s.

With new access to letters and diaries, Davis recounts the heroic attempts of George Mallory and his fellow climbers to conquer the mountain in the face of treacherous terrain and furious weather. Davis shows how the exploration originated in nineteenth-century imperial ambitions, and he takes us far beyond the Himalayas to the trenches of World War I, where Mallory and his generation found themselves and their world utterly shattered. In the wake of a war that cost millions of lives, the Everest expeditions, led by these scions of Britain’s elite, became a symbol of national redemption.

Beautifully written and rich with detail, Into the Silence is a classic account of exploration and mountaineering, and a timeless portrait of a few iconic men.

About the Author

Wade Davis is the best-selling author of more than a dozen books, including The Serpent and the Rainbow and One River, and is an award-winning anthropologist. He currently holds the post of National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence and divides his time between Washington, D.C., and northern British Columbia.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

njcur, May 23, 2013 (view all comments by njcur)
A stunning book worthy of its topic. Wade Davis's writing is exquisite. His research is impeccable. He spent ten years researching and writing this book and it shows in the excellence of the book. I was sorry that there were not better maps on the end papers. But we dragged out the atlas and followed along. My husband and I were both listening to this book and were happy to listen twice when one of us got ahead of the other. Enn Reitel is a wonderful reader. We did feel like we wanted the print book available to look back and sometimes to follow along. The notes and index are extensive and worth taking the time to read. I'm so glad that I picked up this book. It is a treasure.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Paul Sonnenburg, January 4, 2012 (view all comments by Paul Sonnenburg)
Magisterial in scope and depth, this exhaustively researched, superbly crafted synthesis of social history, biography, and mountaineering drama brings to bear the penetrating insight and expert life experience of a masterful writer on some of the 20th century's touchstone sagas. From the incandescent creative culture of Edwardian Bloomsbury and Oxbridge through the monumentally arrogant but nonetheless world-shaping achievement of the Raj to the windswept ramparts of the Himalayas, Wade Davis masterfully weaves the improbably accomplished lives of uncommonly competent and passionate men into a compelling tapestry of adventure and human striving. As Mr. Davis brings them back to shimmering life, you will never forget George Mallory and his legendary friends and their promethean gifts. At once captivating, thrilling, heartbreaking, and hugely satisfying, this is a monumental book for all time.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Paul Sonnenburg, January 4, 2012 (view all comments by Paul Sonnenburg)
Magisterial in scope and depth, this exhaustively researched, superbly crafted synthesis of social history, biography, and mountaineering drama brings to bear the penetrating insight and expert life experience of a masterful writer on some of the 20th century's touchstone sagas. From the incandescent creative culture of Edwardian Bloomsbury and Oxbridge through the monumentally arrogant but nonetheless world-shaping achievement of the Raj to the windswept ramparts of the Himalayas, Wade Davis masterfully weaves the improbably accomplished lives of uncommonly competent and passionate men into a compelling tapestry of adventure and human striving. As Mr. Davis brings them back to shimmering life, you will never forget George Mallory and his legendary friends and their promethean gifts. At once captivating, thrilling, heartbreaking, and hugely satisfying, this is a monumental book for all time.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
View all 3 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375408892
Author:
Davis, Wade
Publisher:
Knopf Publishing Group
Subject:
Biography-Historical
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20111031
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16PP OF PHOTOS and MAPS ENDPAPER MAPS
Pages:
672
Dimensions:
9.54 x 6.61 x 1.68 in 2.38 lb

Other books you might like

  1. The Troubled Man
    Used Hardcover $6.50
  2. The Unconquered: In Search of the... Used Hardcover $8.95
  3. Climbing Free: My Life in the... Used Trade Paper $7.95
  4. The Life of Milarepa: A New... Used Trade Paper $9.50
  5. The Three Waves of Volunteers and... Used Trade Paper $12.50
  6. The House at Sea's End (Ruth... Used Hardcover $17.50

Related Subjects


Biography » General
Biography » Historical
Featured Titles » Bestsellers
Featured Titles » History and Social Science
History and Social Science » World History » General
Sports and Outdoors » Outdoors » Mountaineering » General
Sports and Outdoors » Outdoors » Mountaineering » Literature

Into the Silence New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$32.50 In Stock
Product details 672 pages Knopf Publishing Group - English 9780375408892 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Davis (Wayfinders), a National Geographic explorer-in-residence, tells the story of how a group of men who survived the unfathomable violence of WWI became obsessed with scaling Mt. Everest. Their quest was not for their own glory but for the psyche of their ravaged country and to reaffirm that the human spirit could soar above the inhumanity that countries perpetrate on one another on the battlefield. As with all his works, Davis relies on impeccable research to go into uncommon detail to outline a backstory that centers on the atrocities of trench warfare, English imperialism in India, and the first European expeditions into Tibet and the Himalayas. He also digs deep into the schooling and upbringing of those who took part in the first Everest expeditions, going so far as to investigate the early same-sex relationships of George Mallory. While Davis takes his time leading up to Mallory's first attempt at the summit, his own exploration experience helps him get into the minds of the climbers, the descriptions of the ascents — including the tragic 1922 attempt that saw seven Sherpas lose their lives and the long-unresolved conclusion to the 1924 climb that resulted in Mallory and Andrew Irvine's deaths — are as breathtaking and astounding as any previous climbing literature. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Review" by , "Davis's book, ten years in the writing, is highly absorbing narrative....A heroic attempt to capture the scale of the undertaking to conquer the highest mountain on earth."
"Review" by , "A magnificent, audacious venture...Into the Silence is quite unlike any other mountaineering book. It not only spins a gripping Boy's Own yarn about the early British expeditions to Everest, but investigates how the carnage of the trenches bled into a desire for redemption at the top of the world. Many of those Himalayan explorers, including Mallory, had served in the corpse-ridden fields of northern France. Indeed, of the 26 men who climbed in the three expeditions, 20 had seen front-line action. Six had been severely wounded, two others hospitalized by disease at the front, and one treated for shell shock. All had seen dozens of friends and countrymen die. For these veterans, the author argues, death had lost its power....At its heart, Into the Silence is an elegy for a lost generation."
"Review" by , "A gripper of a read...Silence revives the cliff's-edge drama of those Jazz age climbs and drives home the tragedy of Mallory's death."
"Review" by , "The men in this story had, for the most part, been young in 1914, bright and energetic and full of dreams. By 1918 those who had survived had seen and done things that no one should have to know about, and Davis does a magnificent job detailing their experiences, setting up the rest of the story — the expeditionary saga — as a logical response, even an inspired rejoinder to the soul-destroying realities of war...it is perhaps the book's signature achievement that [Davis] keeps the narrative zipping along toward its inexorable and tragic conclusion while so thoroughly and persuasively contextualizing key events."
"Review" by , "This profoundly ambitious book aims high itself, because it sets the subject of Everest in a specific historical context....Davis's monumental work ranges...widely through the matter of Everest, both on and off the mountain, with harrowing descriptions of life and death on the Western Front, with frank dissections of rivalries, motives, inadequacies and confusions, and measured character studies."
"Review" by , "[A] meticulous history....Culminating in detailed accounts of the ascents that astutely weigh events and controversies, this vital contribution to Everest literature should rivet readers."
"Review" by , "The First World War, the worst calamity humanity has ever inflicted on itself, still reverberates in our lives. In its immediate aftermath, a few young men who had fought in it went looking for a healing challenge, and found it far from the Western Front. In recreating their astonishing adventure, Wade Davis has given us an elegant meditation on the courage to carry on."
"Review" by , "I was captivated. Wade Davis has penned an exceptional book on an extraordinary generation. They do not make them like that anymore. And there would always only ever be one Mallory. From the pathos of the trenches to the inevitable tragedies high on Everest this is a book deserving of awards. Monumental in its scope and conception it nevertheless remains hypnotically fascinating throughout. A wonderful story tinged with sadness."
"Synopsis" by , In this magisterial work of history and adventure, Wade Davis vividly re-creates Britain’s epic attempts to scale Mount Everest in the early 1920s.

With new access to letters and diaries, Davis recounts the heroic attempts of George Mallory and his fellow climbers to conquer the mountain in the face of treacherous terrain and furious weather. Davis shows how the exploration originated in nineteenth-century imperial ambitions, and he takes us far beyond the Himalayas to the trenches of World War I, where Mallory and his generation found themselves and their world utterly shattered. In the wake of a war that cost millions of lives, the Everest expeditions, led by these scions of Britain’s elite, became a symbol of national redemption.

Beautifully written and rich with detail, Into the Silence is a classic account of exploration and mountaineering, and a timeless portrait of a few iconic men.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.